My experience with renouncing and obtaining German citizenship

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I don't know exactly which subforum this belongs on, so please feel free to move it. But I am making this post for anyone looking for more information about this subject.

 

I received an Einbürgerungszusicherung about 3 months ago and was unqualified to receive double citizenship (I earn slightly over the threshhold of 2350$ gross/month). So, I had to renounce my US citizenship in order to be given German citizenship (which doesn't just happen immediately).

 

I sent an e-mail to the e-mail address posted on the US Consulate in Frankfurt's website for renunciations. I received a reply not too long afterwards asking me to fill out some documents and send them back. So I did, made a scan and sent them back. I then received an e-mail asking me to call to make an appointment. So I called and was given an appointment a month and a half later at 8:30am in Frankfurt. I was told to bring my US passport with me, the 2,350$ renunciation fee (or 2,115€ instead), a DHL envelope that was stamped and had my address on it so they could send me some documents and the Einbürgerungszusicherung. Renunciations by US citizens within Germany are only processed in Frankfurt, I was told.

 

So I woke up at 2:30am to be at the consulate by 8:30am that day. I arrived around 8:20am and even though I had an appointment, I was told to wait outside at the reception and security outside with everyone else. Everyone goes to reception first, it's two counters outside that non-US citizens and US citizens wait in line for, the non-citizens on the left and the US citizens on the right. Once I reached the counter for US citizens, I was told my appointment couldn't be found. The receptionist asked me to wait for someone to come outside to talk to me, but no one came. Apparently I was supposed to recieve confirmation from the consulate that I had an appointment, but I never did and wasn't even aware they would send me anything. You're supposed to bring this confirmation to the appointment and show it to the woman at the first reception counter.

 

After about 10 minutes, the receptionist gave me a ticket anyways (?) and I then waited at security for 40ish minutes to be let inside. It's apparently normal that it takes a while, so it's good to factor that into your travel planning. I was told to go to a separate building and arrived in a large hall with many counters and lines of people waiting for different kinds of consular services. The person at that building's reception still asked if I was sure I had made an appointment and I said yes. They pointed out where the casher is and had me pay the renunciation fee and receive a receipt for it. I then took the receipt with me and went upstairs to another of many counters. I was then greeted by the person I had made the appointment with over the phone, who asked why I was late. I was pretty confused but I told them honestly that no one could find my appointment in their system! I was actually afraid for a while that they wouldn't let me inside at all since their security is nuts (and I worked 9 overtime hours at work to get that day off!). We went into a small cabin, I was told to shut the door and then we spoke into microphones through bulletproof glass (all counters there have bulletproof glass).

 

Anyways, they spoke to me in German and said they'd get the consular officer on duty that day to talk to me. They then exited and the consular officer came in. He asked a bunch of questions in English such as "do you know why you're here today" "are you renouncing of your own free will?" "does your family know you're renouncing?" "do you understand you'll be considered a foreigner in the US from now on?", etc. I replied yes to all of them. He also asked if I have a job and speak German. He then stood up, asked me to as well, and said to hold my right hand up. He recited the oath of renunciation and I only had to say "yes" in reply. We then sat back down, I signed some documents he slid under the glass and he gave me a letter stating I'll receive my Certificate of Loss of Nationality within 3 months. I then left the consulate and went back home. I was there for about 1.5hrs total.

 

According to the letter, once I have my Certificate of Loss of Nationality, I am no longer considered an American citizen (but am until it's issued). This is important as you have to turn in this certificate to the German Einbürgerungsbehörde to prove you renounced. Only then will they give you German citizenship.

 

A tip: The tiny kiosk right across from the U-Bahn station Gießenerstraße offers to hold your stuff while you're in the consulate for 3€, which is a great deal. I saw a bunch of people taking electronics into the consulate, but they were put into plastic bags and held for a fee by the security there (I assume for more than 3€). Liquids aren't allowed inside, either. I thus recommend the kiosk's services.

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" I received an Einbürgerungszusicherung about 3 months ago and was unqualified to receive double citizenship (I earn slightly over the threshhold of 2350$ gross/month). So, I had to renounce my US citizenship in order to be given German citizenship "

 

I wasn't aware that with less then $2350 per month income, you could qualify for dual citizenship !  I had looked into this a little during the past few years  because I would love German Citizenship but am not willing to give up the U.S. citizenship.  Lots of conflicting information out there (including on Toytown) and I don't have the time (or desire ?) to try to work through the whole German system although a lot of people seem to be able to get dual citizenship somehow.  I am a retired American on Social Security, have lived here 8 years, passed B-1 Test, my German wife had a stroke last year so there is no chance of being able to go back to the US.  Too bad that there isn't a good and not expensive lawyer or someone else that can handle all of this sort of thing

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1 hour ago, garyh911 said:

" I received an Einbürgerungszusicherung about 3 months ago and was unqualified to receive double citizenship (I earn slightly over the threshhold of 2350$ gross/month). So, I had to renounce my US citizenship in order to be given German citizenship "

 

I wasn't aware that with less then $2350 per month income, you could qualify for dual citizenship !  I had looked into this a little during the past few years  because I would love German Citizenship but am not willing to give up the U.S. citizenship.  Lots of conflicting information out there (including on Toytown) and I don't have the time (or desire ?) to try to work through the whole German system although a lot of people seem to be able to get dual citizenship somehow.  I am a retired American on Social Security, have lived here 8 years, passed B-1 Test, my German wife had a stroke last year so there is no chance of being able to go back to the US.  Too bad that there isn't a good and not expensive lawyer or someone else that can handle all of this sort of thing

Please note it's $2,350 per month GROSS and not NET. It unfortunately makes all the difference. I am also unsure whether this applies to social security income, that's something worth asking the Einbürgerungsbehörde.

 

And I'm going to be really honest with you. A lawyer won't do anything other than charge a lot of money for something you could just do yourself. Just go to your local Eingbürgerungsbehörde and get informed. Explain your situation, but please be aware that the Einbürgerungsbehörde is supposed to frown on double citizenship, they prefer applicants solely wanting German citizenship.

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