Lists of typical German mistakes in English?

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Does anyone know of, or can anyone share, a comprehensive list of Germanisms in English (typically German English mistakes), maybe with examples / exercises for kids to learn the real English expressions?

 

I'm thinking of things like "dinner will be ready until (by) 6pm", or "soccer is the same like (as) football", "how (what) is your friend called?", etc. etc.? Good English speakers, including native speakers start speaking like this, too, I've noticed.

 

Is there a good (cheap) book like this? I wonder if it would be good for the (native speaker!) English teachers at my kids' school too???

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Common mistakes I've heard made by German speakers when speaking English are

 

1. We see us tomorrow. (Directly translated from the German equivalent "wir sehen uns").

 

2. I stood up this morning. (Directly translated from the German equivalent "Ich stehe auf...". Instead of saying I woke up this morning.)

 

Only reason I understand them is that I speak German too.

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There is a version of English Grammar in Use by Raymond Murphy (also known simply as "Murphy" by many long-suffering teachers of English) which has exactly what you are looking for.

It's for German learners and has a supplement which lists all those typical mistakes you refer to.

 

 

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I put on some cloth-es to go to the fair to ride the Big Wheel.

 

Do you make Sport?

 

She is coming to us (she is coming to our place)

 

Speaking from a tutoring perspective, theres a hell of a lot of confusion about when to use the word "got" esp in relation to "gotten" or "have got".

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48 minutes ago, The Vindictive said:

2. I stood up this morning. (Directly translated from the German equivalent "Ich stehe auf...". Instead of saying I woke up this morning.)

 

Ich stehe auf = I get up (I actually get out of the bed and move about)

 

You can wake up (aufwachen) but stay in bed :-)

 

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A friend of mine used to pronounce cheap like sheep.  He once said: "I want to become a steak".

 

 

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@sarabyrd's English teacher in Gymnasium insisted that the students pronounce piano as 'piarno' and valley as 'walley'.

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Ask a German to say:

squirrel

smooth/booth/tooth/

 

the sounds of the squ- and -ooth seem tricky for some the squ-comes out with that 'v' sound for a qu- in German. English spekaers even struggle with the second word. And the --th at the end of the -ooth words can some out as: smoot, boot, toot. :)

 

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12 minutes ago, katheliz said:

@sarabyrd's English teacher in Gymnasium insisted that the students pronounce piano as 'piarno' and valley as 'walley'.

OK, but that was back in the 1970s or not :)?

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13 minutes ago, cybil said:

Ask a German to say:

squirrel

...and conversely and English speaker to have a crack at Eichhoernchen...in either language it's one to sort the men from the boys.

If they can crack squirrel, ask them if they've ever been to Warwick.

 

 

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@LukeSkywalker, those students have been repeating the incorrect pronunciations for pushing fifty years, encouraging others to repeat their errors.  I'll bet there are a lot of former Finsterwalder Gymnasium students who've unwittingly been the cause of their children's and grandchildren's bad marks in English.
And if you mean that the teacher himself no longer says the words wrong, it's only because he's dead.  @sarabyrd got nowhere with him, as an 11-year-old.  Here's one of her favorite memes:

5b9ff1ea4146b_GrammarMylifeisaconstantba

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 "Ich muss nicht " is NOT " I mustn´t "  ...

Anything with " müßen " and the English " must " is dodgy! 

And Germans love saying " Happy End " instead of " happy ending " to a story.

And ANYTHING to do with the Present Perfect--even if you´ve taught it 3 million times...they will dutifully take notes and comment they didn´t know that...:D:D

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