Does 'queeres' mean what I think?

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Queer is nowadays used widely as an umbrella term for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and non-binary folks and it is not a pejorative. But it is a lot shorter than writing out the above or using comically long abbreviations that seem to need updating every few months e.g. LGBTQI*. The asterisk is part of the abbreviation.

 

I'm guessing "what you think" is that the article is being horribly rude, but they certainly don't mean to, even if the term's reclamation hasn't quite won over all generations of people affected, with younger people tending to identify more readily than older people against whom the term was actively used as a slur and with which they associate violence and hate. 

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On 9/5/2018, 10:02:58, Metall said:

What do you *think* it means? :D

 

What it meant 50 years ago.

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I grew up in my part of England in the 50´s and I would have understood the word " queer " meaning simply  " strange ". I was too young to have had any sexual connotations in my mind.

Apparently, it goes back much further in the sexual sense, though:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queer

My mum, a Yorkshire woman, used to use the term " nowt so queer as fold "---meaning basically people anywhere!

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Think of the film Full Metal Jacket where the Gunnery Sergeant asks a recruit where he's from. The recruit replies "Texas" to which the Gunny says the only things that come out of Texas are Queers and Steers, what are you? It's an old term that I would say has been largely replaced.

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1 hour ago, john g. said:

My mum, a Yorkshire woman, used to use the term " nowt so queer as fold "---meaning basically people anywhere!

 

Yup, in deepest Devon you get 'nowt so queer as folk' said quite often, meaning nothing is as weird as the rich tapestry of human behaviour.

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5 minutes ago, kiplette said:

 

Yup, in deepest Devon you get 'nowt so queer as folk' said quite often, meaning nothing is as weird as the rich tapestry of human behaviour.

 

I have always heard this phrase in a strong Lancashire or Yorkshire dialect!!

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12 hours ago, john g. said:

I grew up in my part of England in the 50´s and I would have understood the word " queer " meaning simply  " strange ". I was too young to have had any sexual connotations in my mind.

Apparently, it goes back much further in the sexual sense, though:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queer

My mum, a Yorkshire woman, used to use the term " nowt so queer as folk "---meaning basically people anywhere!

 

10 hours ago, kiplette said:

 

Yup, in deepest Devon you get 'nowt so queer as folk' said quite often, meaning nothing is as weird as the rich tapestry of human behaviour.

 

And the LGBTQI* (insert a wink at the ever shifting acronym here, please) community went and owned the slur, a very strong move.
As for the the saying quoted above, it was used for a ground breaking TV series that ran in the US and Canada from 2000 - 2005:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queer_as_Folk_(U.S._TV_series)
 

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The free magazines you can pick up in bars etc sometimes have article titles like "Kreuz und Queer" criss-crossing Germany usually to report on local issues around the regions / states etc...

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4 hours ago, paulwork said:

The free magazines you can pick up in bars etc sometimes have article titles like "Kreuz und Queer" criss-crossing Germany usually to report on local issues around the regions / states etc...

No, that's "Kreuz und Quer" - unless it's the gay-centric version.

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