taking my dog to Sinai - Egypt

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Hallo,

 

any one took his pet to Sinai - Egypt? Do you know if there is any problems or permissions i need to obtains when i get back to Germany?

i plan to travel for 10 days.

 

thanks. Miki

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3 hours ago, mikiKam said:

Do you know if there is any problems or permissions i need to obtains when i get back to Germany?

i plan to travel for 10 days.

 

Never mind about what you need when you get back to Germany - you are going to encounter more than enough problems getting the permissions you need to enter Egypt with a dog before you even leave Germany!

 

I really enjoyed most of the time I spent in Egypt (2 x Sept - March as driver-mechanic with a UK safari tour firm driving ex-army trucks for 2 - 4 week tours through the whole country) and, knowing a little Arabic thanks to very positive prior experience working and chilling with Egyptians in the UAE, found the local people to be very friendly and easy to get along with.

 

That said, and although there are a tiny number of local folk who do keep dogs (either as guard dogs or rat deterrents in industrial zones or as pedigree hunters or lapdogs by the very rich) the vast majority of Egyptians are not the least bit tolerant of dogs.

 

They consider them dangerous (outbreaks of rabies are common), unclean (food waste in large cities and tourist areas attract rats and stray dogs) and due to their fears and anxieties some will tend to react to dogs accordingly on sight, throwing rocks or whacking them with a stick, whip, belt or baseball bat!

 

Apart from Dec-Feb, temperatures in the Sinai are usually even higher (35 - 48°) for 12 hours daily than they were in Germany during this record June and July.

 

No public buildings or other facilities like museums, art galleries, stores, cafes, restaurants, hotel bars, pools, golf clubs, etc., etc., will allow dogs to enter.

Even if the dog is OK with the heat outdoors or being left alone, leaving a dog outside any public facility is a high risk gamble.

Dognappers (or worse) are not slow to take advantage of such offers.

Very few hotels or tourist resorts will even accept bookings for dogs.

Virtually no shops carry any stock at all of pet food.

If you are not familiar with the locality then you need to check out things like where you can obtain pet-food, a local emergency vet, a taxi firm whose drivers will carry a dog and places where you can walk the dog safely (free of fresh poisoned bait set down for rats and stray dogs).

 

Airlines generally restrict the carriage of dogs or cats within the cabin area to a maximum combined (travel box and dog/cat) weight of 6kg. Otherwise they will only be carried as hold baggage. They will only allow animals to board which are accompanied by the correct documentation for the destination country.

 

For a dog to enter Egypt it must be chipped with the current EU-type chip and the matching animal pass (a vet can issue those) and must also have a vet-provided health pass (Gesundheitsausweiss).

 

That pass must state that it is free of any disease, is vaccinted against all applicable (to Egypt) disease risks and is fit to travel. It must have been issued no longer than 14 days before date of entry and must also have been certified by either the Egyptian consulate in Frankfurt am Main or the Embassy in Berlin.

 

At the airport in Egypt a local official vet will examine the animal prior to authorizing it to enter the country. If they express the least doubt about its fitness the dog will be consigned to a quarantine facility for as long as it takes to establish its fitness.

 

Reportedly airport officials tend to err on the side of cautious doubt, although it is rumoured that that may be due to the opportunities to collect kick-backs from commercial quarntine operators.

 

I also love animals, and dogs in particular so, bearing all the stress for both dog and person in mind, I would never, ever consider taking a dog to Egypt for a mere holiday.

 

Please think carefully about whether, or why, you would want to put your pet through all that.

 

It wouldn't be much of a holiday for a dog to spend 2 x 5 or 6 hours stuck in a box at high altitude, especially not if the time between travelling were taken up being left alone for 10 days in a quarantine facility.

 

If you don't know anyone who could act as a dog-sitter for 10 days then try using www.google.de to look for a Hundesitter, Tierpension or Hundehotel near your PLZ and City name. Had you reset your TT profile location to reflect where you are in Germany I would have checked some links for you, but I don't think you're still in the USA at the moment.

 

HTH

 

2B

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7 hours ago, 2B_orNot2B said:

 

Never mind about what you need when you get back to Germany - you are going to encounter more than enough problems getting the permissions you need to enter Egypt with a dog before you even leave Germany!

 

I really enjoyed most of the time I spent in Egypt (2 x Sept - March as driver-mechanic with a UK safari tour firm driving ex-army trucks for 2 - 4 week tours through the whole country) and, knowing a little Arabic thanks to very positive prior experience working and chilling with Egyptians in the UAE, found the local people to be very friendly and easy to get along with.

 

That said, and although there are a tiny number of local folk who do keep dogs (either as guard dogs or rat deterrents in industrial zones or as pedigree hunters or lapdogs by the very rich) the vast majority of Egyptians are not the least bit tolerant of dogs.

 

They consider them dangerous (outbreaks of rabies are common), unclean (food waste in large cities and tourist areas attract rats and stray dogs) and due to their fears and anxieties some will tend to react to dogs accordingly on sight, throwing rocks or whacking them with a stick, whip, belt or baseball bat!

 

Apart from Dec-Feb, temperatures in the Sinai are usually even higher (35 - 48°) for 12 hours daily than they were in Germany during this record June and July.

 

No public buildings or other facilities like museums, art galleries, stores, cafes, restaurants, hotel bars, pools, golf clubs, etc., etc., will allow dogs to enter.

Even if the dog is OK with the heat outdoors or being left alone, leaving a dog outside any public facility is a high risk gamble.

Dognappers (or worse) are not slow to take advantage of such offers.

Very few hotels or tourist resorts will even accept bookings for dogs.

Virtually no shops carry any stock at all of pet food.

If you are not familiar with the locality then you need to check out things like where you can obtain pet-food, a local emergency vet, a taxi firm whose drivers will carry a dog and places where you can walk the dog safely (free of fresh poisoned bait set down for rats and stray dogs).

 

Airlines generally restrict the carriage of dogs or cats within the cabin area to a maximum combined (travel box and dog/cat) weight of 6kg. Otherwise they will only be carried as hold baggage. They will only allow animals to board which are accompanied by the correct documentation for the destination country.

 

For a dog to enter Egypt it must be chipped with the current EU-type chip and the matching animal pass (a vet can issue those) and must also have a vet-provided health pass (Gesundheitsausweiss).

 

That pass must state that it is free of any disease, is vaccinted against all applicable (to Egypt) disease risks and is fit to travel. It must have been issued no longer than 14 days before date of entry and must also have been certified by either the Egyptian consulate in Frankfurt am Main or the Embassy in Berlin.

 

At the airport in Egypt a local official vet will examine the animal prior to authorizing it to enter the country. If they express the least doubt about its fitness the dog will be consigned to a quarantine facility for as long as it takes to establish its fitness.

 

Reportedly airport officials tend to err on the side of cautious doubt, although it is rumoured that that may be due to the opportunities to collect kick-backs from commercial quarntine operators.

 

I also love animals, and dogs in particular so, bearing all the stress for both dog and person in mind, I would never, ever consider taking a dog to Egypt for a mere holiday.

 

Please think carefully about whether, or why, you would want to put your pet through all that.

 

It wouldn't be much of a holiday for a dog to spend 2 x 5 or 6 hours stuck in a box at high altitude, especially not if the time between travelling were taken up being left alone for 10 days in a quarantine facility.

 

If you don't know anyone who could act as a dog-sitter for 10 days then try using www.google.de to look for a Hundesitter, Tierpension or Hundehotel near your PLZ and City name. Had you reset your TT profile location to reflect where you are in Germany I would have checked some links for you, but I don't think you're still in the USA at the moment.

 

HTH

 

2B

 

 

Thanks a lot 2B for the great and detailed reply.

 

For the traveling into Egypt. I think i will go by land. Planning to fly to Israel, and then cross the border by foot.

 i understood that there is very little problem in the border inspection. 

 

My dog already flew with me before, so all the EU-type chip, blood test, vaccinations  etc are according to the demands. 

 

Regarding the Gesundheitsausweiss - last time i got it from the Authorized vet of the city i live in (not a private Vet, it is not enough. BUT, i did not need to certified it. How do i certified it in egyptian consulate in Frankfurt am Main or the Embassy in Berlin? I need to stop there or just send them the Vet Format?

In any case i already sent a mail to Egypt embassy in Germany. I hope they read English, as my German is not sufficient.

 

Yours,

 

Miki

 

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Here's the English language version of the Berlin Egyptian Embassy's summary of their general requirements and scale of fees for the legalization (beglaubigung) of documents.

 

You can communicate with them in Arabic, German, French or English. In fact, for commercial documents in German, they require certified translations in one of the other 3 languages for legalization purposes. I don't think that applies for private documents though.

 

You are correct wrt having to obtain the official Gesundheitsausweiss from an Amtsveterinär appointed by the LandesGesundheitsamt or Regierungspräsident in the state you live in.

 

Obviously, apart from fees, you will need to consider the issue of availability of appointments for that service too.

 

3 hours ago, mikiKam said:

My dog already flew with me before, so all the EU-type chip, blood test, vaccinations  etc are according to the demands. 

 

Well, that's half the paperwork done already BUT do check with your vet for any changes in  current vaccination requirements for all countries you plan to have your dog enter.

 

3 hours ago, mikiKam said:

For the traveling into Egypt. I think i will go by land. Planning to fly to Israel, and then cross the border by foot.

 

 i understood that there is very little problem in the border inspection. 

 

I have no personal experience of crossing that particular border although I believe the authorities on both sides are much more stringent about inspecting all traffic flowing from Egypt into Israel.

 

Be sure to take the possibility of such bottleneck delays into account and allow enough time to avoid extra stress on either of you.

 

I do wish you both a smooth, uneventful and enjoyable experience.

 

That said, I still would not choose to subject a dog to the risk of exposure to so many potentially traumatic minor events over the course of such a short period of time.

 

Consider how long it takes for a dog to get accustomed to the strange new scents of a local street he hasn't been in for 2 or 3 days...

 

- then consider how (quite apart from the unfamiliar or weird cacophony or ambient wall of sounds) the olefactory senses of every typical European, Australasian or American human tourist are constantly bombarded with the strange and exotic scents and smells of the streets and basars from dawn to midnight until they board their return flight...

 

- then remember that a healthy dog is sensitive to, and capable of registering, a range of sounds 2 - 3 times wider and a range of scents 400 x more varied than a human can.

 

*grubelnde (pondering) growl*

 

2B

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3 hours ago, 2B_orNot2B said:

 

 

Here's the English language version of the Berlin Egyptian Embassy's summary of their general requirements and scale of fees for the legalization (beglaubigung) of documents.

 

You can communicate with them in Arabic, German, French or English. In fact, for commercial documents in German, they require certified translations in one of the other 3 languages for legalization purposes. I don't think that applies for private documents though.

 

You are correct wrt having to obtain the official Gesundheitsausweiss from an Amtsveterinär appointed by the LandesGesundheitsamt or Regierungspräsident in the state you live in.

 

Obviously, apart from fees, you will need to consider the issue of availability of appointments for that service too.

 

 

Well, that's half the paperwork done already BUT do check with your vet for any changes in  current vaccination requirements for all countries you plan to have your dog enter.

 

 

I have no personal experience of crossing that particular border although I believe the authorities on both sides are much more stringent about inspecting all traffic flowing from Egypt into Israel.

 

Be sure to take the possibility of such bottleneck delays into account and allow enough time to avoid extra stress on either of you.

 

I do wish you both a smooth, uneventful and enjoyable experience.

 

That said, I still would not choose to subject a dog to the risk of exposure to so many potentially traumatic minor events over the course of such a short period of time.

 

Consider how long it takes for a dog to get accustomed to the strange new scents of a local street he hasn't been in for 2 or 3 days...

 

- then consider how (quite apart from the unfamiliar or weird cacophony or ambient wall of sounds) the olefactory senses of every typical European, Australasian or American human tourist are constantly bombarded with the strange and exotic scents and smells of the streets and basars from dawn to midnight until they board their return flight...

 

- then remember that a healthy dog is sensitive to, and capable of registering, a range of sounds 2 - 3 times wider and a range of scents 400 x more varied than a human can.

 

*grubelnde (pondering) growl*

 

2B

 

 

Dear 2B,

 

thanks a lot!

 

all the information is great.

 

i understand your remarks and concerns regarding the dog experience. Believe me, i take them into consideration when i make the final decision. Btw -  i will be in any case only in Sinai, not in internal city in Egypt. Sinai, may you know, is different from Egypt Cairo and any other big city. 

 

What is still missing is my original question, what will be on the way back? Does Germany needs anything other than the pet valid passport?

 

 

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21 hours ago, mikiKam said:

 

 

Thanks a lot 2B for the great and detailed reply.

 

For the traveling into Egypt. I think i will go by land. Planning to fly to Israel, and then cross the border by foot.

 i understood that there is very little problem in the border inspection. 

 

My dog already flew with me before, so all the EU-type chip, blood test, vaccinations  etc are according to the demands. 

 

Regarding the Gesundheitsausweiss - last time i got it from the Authorized vet of the city i live in (not a private Vet, it is not enough. BUT, i did not need to certified it. How do i certified it in egyptian consulate in Frankfurt am Main or the Embassy in Berlin? I need to stop there or just send them the Vet Format?

In any case i already sent a mail to Egypt embassy in Germany. I hope they read English, as my German is not sufficient.

 

Yours,

 

Miki

 

 

What route are you taking back?  Flying direct to Germany from Egypt or back via Israel?

 

The reason is because Israel only allows the import of pets through very specific ports of entry and bringing pets via land crossings is not allowed.

 

 

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1 hour ago, dj_jay_smith said:

 

What route are you taking back?  Flying direct to Germany from Egypt or back via Israel?

 

The reason is because Israel only allows the import of pets through very specific ports of entry and bringing pets via land crossings is not allowed.

 

 

 

 

Hallo Jay and thanks for the reply,

 

for Israel i have made my homeworks and it seems you may be misinformed

 

You are allowed to take a pet to Sinai through Eilat. I called them yesterday and 100% sure.

For 10 Days  you will need an Israeli Vet approval, sign by a authorised Vet

For more than 10 days, to bring the pet back to Israel, you will need an authorised approval from Vet from the other side of the border. It's the same for land or air ports. In both cases, taking a pet from israel for more than 10 days, you will need a Formal Vet Health approval from the last country you visit. 

 In this case  Sinai - i am very thoughtful if there have there .  So, ten days limit is better.

 

 

 

I again wonder what is the process to bring a pet back to Germany, from any country outside the EU. 

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1 hour ago, mikiKam said:

 

 

 

I again wonder what is the process to bring a pet back to Germany, from any country outside the EU. 

 to make my question clear. 

i have a dog here, with EU dog passport, with all needed vaccines and registered by the authorities, paying yearly tax.

 

I plan to take him with me to a vacation outside of EU. The processes taking him out is clear to me, and i know what shell i do. No open issues. 

I looked all over the internet and I could not find is there are any requirements when we come together back.  

Did anyone knows or better took his pet outside and back from the EU?

 

Thanks,

 

Miki

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I don't know anything about this at all, but since the topic has been open a while and no-one else seems to have answered the question you actually asked, here are the results of my 'googling around'.

Take them or leave them as you wish.

 

I think at some level you are bringing a dog into germany from outside the EU. It shouldn't make much of a difference if it has been away on a vacation or has never been in Germany. If you meet the requirements for a new pet coming in then you should be OK.

So  I looked at the rules for bringing a dog to germany from outside the EU and found this page.

When I read the details, there was some text about extra rules for high-rabies countries,  and this link  suggested that both Israel and Egypt are considered such.

 

So this part of the rules might be a problem for you:-

Quote

If your pet is entering Germany from a high-rabies country (click here), your pet must be microchipped, then vaccinated for rabies (in that order). After waiting 30 days, a rabies titer test (FAVN) must be administered. (Have your veterinarian scan your pet's microchip prior to the titer test.)

Samples must be processed at approved laboratories. Assuming test results are within acceptable limits, your pet can enter Germany no sooner than 3 calendar months after the date the blood was drawn and avoid quarantine. This step is not required unless entering Germany from a high-rabies country (click here).

 

 

Like I said, not sure if it really helps, and I think the others that are advising you to find a dog-sitter are really steering you in the right direction.

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2 hours ago, pappnase said:

I don't know anything about this at all, but since the topic has been open a while and no-one else seems to have answered the question you actually asked, here are the results of my 'googling around'.

Take them or leave them as you wish.

 

I think at some level you are bringing a dog into germany from outside the EU. It shouldn't make much of a difference if it has been away on a vacation or has never been in Germany. If you meet the requirements for a new pet coming in then you should be OK.

So  I looked at the rules for bringing a dog to germany from outside the EU and found this page.

When I read the details, there was some text about extra rules for high-rabies countries,  and this link  suggested that both Israel and Egypt are considered such.

 

So this part of the rules might be a problem for you:-

 

 

Like I said, not sure if it really helps, and I think the others that are advising you to find a dog-sitter are really steering you in the right direction.

 

 

Thanks Pappnase,

 

actually you are not accurate. Importing is NOT as taking your pet with you from Germany to another country, BUT your link helped me understand clearly what i need to do and it is very simple. Look at your link, paragraph Number 10, "Exporting Pets Living in Germany". Lucky enough, the paragraph is very clear what one needs to do if he wants to take his pet with him to a vacation, and it is much simple and different from the paragraph your have quoted. 

In any case, your link did the work for me!

 

Miki,

 

 

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On 26/08/2018, 02:38:33, 2B_orNot2B said:

That said, and although there are a tiny number of local folk who do keep dogs (either as guard dogs or rat deterrents in industrial zones or as pedigree hunters or lapdogs by the very rich) the vast majority of Egyptians are not the least bit tolerant of dogs.

 

They consider them dangerous (outbreaks of rabies are common), unclean (food waste in large cities and tourist areas attract rats and stray dogs) and due to their fears and anxieties some will tend to react to dogs accordingly on sight, throwing rocks or whacking them with a stick, whip, belt or baseball bat!

I spent about 6 weeks altogether in Egypt, and this was in 2008, so interpret as you wish.

 

But I was kind of shocked how stray animals were treated. I understand that to them, they are the equivalent of street pigeons or worse, and even to most of 'us' a mangy stray mongrel is perhaps not as 'valuable' as toy pug-tzu Schmoopsy McCuddlebunny III. But indeed, I saw people (usually teen boys) having fun kicking and whacking stray dogs and cats, laughing all the while. I saw one group of teenagers taking a running kick (like a football) at a skinny puppy which yelped and flew above the awning of a shop down the street, smacked against the wall, fell, and didn't move. I saw another group pick of a stray cat by the tail, swing it while it screeched and throw it against a wall while chuckling.


Different country, but in India, in a taxi in a midsize northern city... after I pointed out that along the stretch of road we were driving, that there were quite a few dead stray dogs splattered on the street (like 5 or 6 at least), many birds taking their fill, the cabbie told me nonchalant that they were probably purposely run over, as that was what some local young men with cars did for fun at night. No shortage of them, he said.

 

On 26/08/2018, 02:38:33, 2B_orNot2B said:

Airlines generally restrict the carriage of dogs or cats within the cabin area to a maximum combined (travel box and dog/cat) weight of 6kg. Otherwise they will only be carried as hold baggage. They will only allow animals to board which are accompanied by the correct documentation for the destination country.

I wonder what the attitude to dogs will be on local busses. Many religiously minded folks (of which, in the countryside especially, Egypt has many) will view dogs as unclean...

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26 minutes ago, alderhill said:

 

 

 

 

I spent about 6 weeks altogether in Egypt, and this was in 2008, so interpret as you wish.

 

But I was kind of shocked how stray animals were treated. I understand that to them, they are the equivalent of street pigeons or worse, and even to most of 'us' a mangy stray mongrel is perhaps not as 'valuable' as toy pug-tzu Schmoopsy McCuddlebunny III. But indeed, I saw people (usually teen boys) having fun kicking and whacking stray dogs and cats, laughing all the while. I saw one group of teenagers taking a running kick (like a football) at a skinny puppy which yelped and flew above the awning of a shop down the street, smacked against the wall, fell, and didn't move. I saw another group pick of a stray cat by the tail, swing it while it screeched and throw it against a wall while chuckling.


Different country, but in India, in a taxi in a midsize northern city... after I pointed out that along the stretch of road we were driving, that there were quite a few dead stray dogs splattered on the street (like 5 or 6 at least), many birds taking their fill, the cabbie told me nonchalant that they were probably purposely run over, as that was what some local young men with cars did for fun at night. No shortage of them, he said.

 

I wonder what the attitude to dogs will be on local busses. Many religiously minded folks (of which, in the countryside especially, Egypt has many) will view dogs as unclean...

 

Sinai is one part of egypt, indeed. But very different from the cities like Cairo.

there is not traveling in buses from israel borde to the camp places. Many people i discussed with in sinai forums took their dogs with them. The Bedouin there are not ‚dog lovers‘ and you need to take care of your dog and be alert, but you very likely not see or meet any violence against dogs there. If you need any more information you can contact me in private. I pretty much got all the information one needs on this subject 

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Well, it would be interesting if you report back after your return, and let us know if all of our doom and gloom came to pass or not... Certainly wish you good luck and positive experiences! Have fun, stay safe.

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