Living in Singen/Konstanz and working in Winterthur

10 posts in this topic

Hello everyone.

Currenly I live in Munich. The life here is expensive and it's impossible to find a 3 rooms flat for a normal price, since I am planning to move my familly here (we are 3 people in total). I am a web developer and from what I can see, my current salary is 52K which is again, low for Munich. I have experience of 5 years and planning either to change a job or a country. When my wife will move here, she need to learn German and gain some education to be able to work, and we have a kid. That means I will be the only one who will work for a several years...

 

What I have in mind now, to move to Konstanz or Singen and find a job in Switzerland to work there. For instance - Winterthur. I can have a car so its not a problem if I drive 60 km every day in one way. 

 

The reason of it - higher salaries in Switzerland and we perhaps can buy a small house in Germany. Something like that. 

Is here someone who have a good experience in a similar situation? Who works in Switzerland and lives in Germany? Is it worth it? 

 

Thank you in advance!

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as per my knowledge: Let me clear some issues regarding this topic:

1. you have to pay 4.7% (approximately) Tax to Switzerland (it is automatically deducts from your salary).
2. you have to pay 13% (approximately) Tax to Germany (Quarterly, you pay to nearest finanzamt in Germany).-IF YOU LIVE IN GERMANY
3. You have to pay Health insurance for yourselves in Swiss (it is not like as in Germany) and it is around 250€ to 300€ (cheapone).
4. You have to take Health insurance for your wife in Germany and it costs around 180€.


at the end I can say it will be the same if you live in germany or in Switzerland.

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Do you really think it will be the same?

I think it could be better, even if you pay all the taxes and health insurances. 

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I don't know the details but my wife is from down that way and I know of loads of people doing it. It must be a pretty decent deal.

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Just be aware that you will also be subject to currency fluctuations. 

 

I had an colleague who lives in Geneva.  He knows many people who commute from France -> Switzerland for work and also some that commute Switzerland -> France.  About 3 years ago there was a big shift in the currency exchange rate when the Swiss government lifted some currency restrictions, and he said he had friends who were suddenly nearly 30% better off but others who were now 30% worse off!

 

While this was an extreme action and should not occur often a gradual change of one currency over time can affect you either for good or bad.

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9 minutes ago, quattro said:

Do you really think it will be the same?

I think it could be better, even if you pay all the taxes and health insurances. 

Yes, You can save hardly upto 200 € if you live in Germany.

if your kid age is less than 5 years then it is worth to live in Germany, because of Krippe fees. The Krippe fees are 5 times high in Swiss as compared to Germany.

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4 hours ago, quattro said:

I can have a car so its not a problem if I drive 60 km every day in one way. 

 

AFAIR, in order to qualify to be eligible wrt work visa, residential, insurance and taxation purposes as a cross-border worker (Grenzgänger) under EU/EEA rules the single journey between the individual's dwelling in country A and work place in country B may not exceed 30 km (by direct line of sight).

 

There are several sources of useful info provided by the EU, German, French, Austrian and Swiss national, regional and local government departments as well as public and private health insurers, banks and trade unions which deal with such enquires on a daily basis.

 

There are some links below.

 

You shoud take plenty of time studying them with great care.

 

There are potentially expensive newbie errors to be made should you fail to comply with all prerequisite conditions. Some of the Swiss employment rules and regulations appear to be even stranger and more illogical than German ones too!

 

These links are in no particular order...

 

EURES - EURES - The European job mobility portal - European Commission

 

INFOBEST — Netzwerk der information- und Beratungsstellen für grenzüberschreitende Fragen am Oberrhein

 

Grenzgänger - EURES-T Oberrhein

 

Sozialversicherung — INFOBEST

 

Grenzgänger | Info for Switzerland

 

Compulsory Insurance - Gemeinsame Einrichtung KVG | Switzerland

 

Merkblätter für Grenzgänger - GKV-Spitzenverband, DVKA

 

Grenzgänger – Wikipedia

 

EURES - EURES in Cross-border Regions - European Commission

 

HTH

 

2B

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On 22/08/2018, 15:05:28, 2B_orNot2B said:

AFAIR, in order to qualify to be eligible wrt work visa, residential, insurance and taxation purposes as a cross-border worker (Grenzgänger) under EU/EEA rules the single journey between the individual's dwelling in country A and work place in country B may not exceed 30 km (by direct line of sight).

This is not correct. The distance between the dwelling and the place of work can be greater than 30 km. ;) 

You can maintain your main home and legal residence in the UK for example, but work in Switzerland as a cross border commuter on a G-permit.

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On 22/08/2018, 11:03:00, Kristan said:

You have to pay Health insurance for yourselves in Swiss (it is not like as in Germany) and it is around 250€ to 300€ (cheapone).

As far as I aware, EU-EFTA nationals who are cross-border workers can choose whether to be insured in Switzerland or in Germany. 

https://www.thelocal.ch/20200221/five-things-you-should-know-if-you-are-a-cross-border-worker-in-switzerland

 

If you are a EU/EFTA national, you have a choice between the Swiss system or the coverage in your country of residence. This is called “right of option”. 

If you don’t want to be insured in Switzerland, you must submit a request for exemption to the health insurance services of the canton where you work within three months. After this deadline, the Swiss authorities will automatically sign you up for compulsory insurance coverage, choosing a carrier on your behalf.
 

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