What is the best response when Germans are unreasonably rude to you? Or reasonably rude?

188 posts in this topic

3 minutes ago, Techsmex said:

and you acquired this fan from?   home or another departing expat I presume.  Finding fans in Germany is like finding a four leaf clover. 

 

nooooo they already had them in the office when I started working.  Usually they have them in the window to exchange the air.  But that particular coworker points his fan at his crotch - sits in his chair spread eagled.

 

I'm dead serious.  I hold my breath just in case if I have to walk by.  I really don't want to know.

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Totally off topíc, I´m afraid! Loads of cloves on Crete instead of grass...but mainly three leaves. The dogs love it. 

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16 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

...you'll get a stiff neck"

 

a malady that Germans use for those yearly sick leave excursions to Greece or Spain.

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14 minutes ago, Techsmex said:

Finding fans in Germany is like finding a four leaf clover. 

Yeah, like finding a Michelin restaurant in Texas 👻.

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@lisa13

You should of replied, 

'if that happens I will notify you and perhaps you would be so kind and lend me your scarf'. 

 

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4 minutes ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Yeah, like finding a Michelin restaurant in Texas 👻.

 

You kidding right?   We gots gobs of National Discount Tire locations all over Texas that carry Michelins and serve hot dogs and popcorn while you wait.

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6 minutes ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Yeah, like finding a Michelin restaurant in Texas 👻.

 

In Texas, a Michelin restaurant is where they serve very specifically executed roadkill.

 

(Actually, Dallas and San Antonio sport some very fine dining.)

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26 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

 

last week, office 33 degrees, I turned on my fan.  Coworker looks over...says something about "you should adjust that so it's blowing down...if it's blowing on you like that you'll get a stiff neck"

 

and he was dead serious.

And I would reply- "Thanks Mum!"

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Just now, AlexTr said:

 

In Texas, a Michelin restaurant is where they serve very specifically executed roadkill.

 

(Actually, Dallas and San Antonio sport some very fine dining.)

 

I beg to differ.  not so specific, it's a random thing sometimes, but it all tastes the same.

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19 minutes ago, Techsmex said:

and you acquired this fan from?   home or another departing expat I presume.  Finding fans in Germany is like finding a four leaf clover. 

 

I've seen them at real but they don't always have them. Mediamarkt and expert should have them unless maybe they're sold out because it's been freaking hot.

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1 minute ago, LeonG said:

 

I've seen them at real but they don't always have them. Mediamarkt and expert should have them unless maybe they're sold out because it's been freaking hot.

I see them in department stores too

 

I bought one for my apartment at Kaufhof.  they had a nice range of models, even.

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1 minute ago, LeonG said:

 

I've seen them at real but they don't always have them. Mediamarkt and expert should have them unless maybe they're sold out because it's been freaking hot.

Well, back in the day before the climate change came upon us, finding anything in Deutschland that stirred air was rather rare.  Usually passed down by other expats, or brought with us from the States.  Finding a ceiling fan was even more of a needle in the haystack.

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11 minutes ago, Sir Percy B said:

@lisa13

You should of replied, 

'if that happens I will notify you and perhaps you would be so kind and lend me your scarf'. 

 

 

what I really should have done was to start coughing and rubbing my throat a few hours later...then feigned a dreaded sore throat (advanced stage of Neckmonia (TM)*) to score some time off

 

*the term Neckmonia is trademarked by fraufruit and is used here with permission (I hope)

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57 minutes ago, Techsmex said:

Didn't experience this during my time there, but I did experience when Germans are unseasonably rude.  Once, on a chilly day in Dresden, riding the tram, I couldn't stand the smell and the stuffiness, so I opened a window.  A German man immediately stood up, slammed it shut and sat down.  I re-opened it, and he just kept staring at me.  I first thought it rude, but later discovered it was fear.  Fear of drafts.

hahahah too good :-)

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28 minutes ago, Sir Percy B said:

@lisa13

You should of replied, 

'if that happens I will notify you and perhaps you would be so kind and lend me your scarf'. 

 

Dear Sir Percy,

 

Sorry, but this really drives me crazy as an English teacher. "...should HAVE replied..." or  "'ve" NOT 'of'.

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OK - back on topic - :biggrin: - the best response when a German is being unreasonably rude ?

 

Let me tell you, from the German point of view (I am native German, spent the past 14 years living in the Midwest) Germans are never "rude", they are simply stating facts - no emotion required. For that same reason Germans cannot be "unreasonable" either, because facts are simply facts - no reason needed.

 

With that said, your "best response" is (logically) to listen to the factual information that you have been given, and take appropriate action. You need to learn how to separate your (personal, nobody's business) feelings, emotions, and assumptions from the factual context of the interaction that you are having with a German (somebody not related to you in any personal way, simply doing a business transaction).

 

The real estate agent in your story doesn't care about your feelings, he is trying to find the best possible tenant for this apartment. Since you and your wife both intend to live there, the real estate agent needs to see you both, have both your SCHUFA checked out, and probably see more factual detail about you both later on, before he can make an informed decision. Nothing personal, simply a business transaction.

 

Actually, you are the one making this transaction overly difficult for the real estate agent by not listening to what he told you to do, and then being all argumentative about it. So, if the real estate agent had neutral (or no) feeling towards you at first, by now he probably actually dislikes you - and that may influence his decision about who is going to get the apartment in the end.

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2 hours ago, Sir Percy B said:

I used to save up all my bottles until I had at least a 100, on one occasion I managed over 200, their faces were an absolute picture, the comments, the moans and tuts as the queues behind me were getting longer and longer, I would leave feeling mission accomplished.

 

You are my hero!

 

 
 
 
 
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2 hours ago, Sir Percy B said:

 

It's when the cashier says, '6 cent vielleicht', then you know you're in for another 5 minute wait while they rumble through their Portemonnaie ohne Brille trying to distinguish between the 1's, 2's and 5 cents.

 

Although I've gotten over it now, I was always shocked in my early years here how the cashiers would put up with this crap of digging around for change.

 

I've been told it's not politically correct, but I tell my family all the time, the motto in Germany is:   Inconvenience macht frei!

 

 

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40 minutes ago, karin_brenig said:

OK - back on topic - :biggrin: - the best response when a German is being unreasonably rude ?

 

Let me tell you, from the German point of view (I am native German, spent the past 14 years living in the Midwest) Germans are never "rude", they are simply stating facts - no emotion required. For that same reason Germans cannot be "unreasonable" either, because facts are simply facts - no reason needed.

 

 

I dunno, a lot of German's "facts" sound more like "alternative facts". Like the wind giving you neck pain. :D 

 

 

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19 hours ago, Anna66 said:

 

Yes true indeed, but I actually find it is older people who should know better that are behaving worse. Even labelling sensitive people in younger generations as "snowflakes". Instead of compassion, contempt.

 

 

 

I may be wrong, but from what I've seen it's the right-wing Trumptilian scourge that bandies the term snowflake about. Overreacting to their drivel is mistake number one.        

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9 hours ago, wien4ever said:

I dunno, a lot of German's "facts" sound more like "alternative facts". Like the wind giving you neck pain. :D 

Yeah, the rude Germans even infiltrated the English wikipedia with their "alternative facts"...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torticollis#Acquired_torticollis

"Sometimes draughts, colds, or unusual postures are implicated; however in many cases no clear cause is found. These episodes are commonly seen by physicians"

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