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Mid thirties student life in Munich!!

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I'm turning 33 this year with 7 years of work experience in a German engineering company (Thou I'm based in HK)

Due to personal & family reasons, I've decided to get back in to University life.

 

I found a very decent MSc Management course at TUM and will be starting my course from this October.

Major reason of taking up this course is to make a move from Asia to Europe and totally experience a new lifestyle change.

 

Plan B: If I feel that my classes are hard to adopt due to my age range and if I dont fit in the student profile, I intend to search for a job in Germany/Europe and if im lucky enough to get a good deal . I'll take it.

 

HAs any one on the range of 35 started masters in Germany? Whats your experience?

 

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It may depend on the course and location and such, but you may not be that much of an outlier.   The academic path starts later and last longer and offers more diverse and flexible routes.  There are also fewer barriers to entry (financial, entry requirements) and support for access (such as returners who had early families) and its normal to be studying and working concurrently, and such.   Universities here are certainly not dominated by the over 30s, but it's also not unusual to still be in academia at this age here, for various reasons.

 

When I've taught in the Unis (not your field) then there's always older people, especially post-grad.  I'm considering doing it because I've got a thesis to write and I'm in my 50s.

 

Depending on the demands of the education, it may be possible you could work as well.   I could work as well.   That's not unusual here and, especially in the STEM side, there is potentially the option to do both, I think.    Companies employ post-grads for the purposes of research.  That's how most people I know actually got their post-grads.  They were employed.

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In Asia, people tend to do age appropriate things, what age to study, what age to get married, have children etc.. but it’s a less issue in Europe I think, not uncommon that people go back to university after years of working as mature student, and in some way it’s more benifitial.

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Thank you people for all the nice words. It really motivates me and I'm kind of excited about this change.

Only contemplating issue was that I had to choose between a wonderful job that I'm  into ( With a good pay) and getting back to student jobs /living in dormitories  etc.

 

As a non-EU,  I believe I'm only allowed to work 20h per week and this should be student jobs? Are these on a comparable nature to a full time job prospects?

 

 

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If you have a Bachelors in Engineering you will not have it super easy in Germany. The standard engineering degree is equivalent to a Masters. But if you have experience (and self confidence) you should be okay.

 

If you get the chance , do a praktikum. At your age and experience it may seem weird but that is the entry into the german world of work. Your classmates will definitely be doing one (at least all German engineers try and do at least one) and try and leverage that experience into a job at the same firm.

 

Part time work for students is possible, but part time professional work is a bit of a challenge (someone who has part timed in DE can inform you better). Since your future employer might be on the hook for your health care, having a professional part timer might not make a ton of fiscal sense for them. (If you get in as a student then I think the health care can be covered by you?).

 

Good luck.

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9 hours ago, Financepil said:

 

As a non-EU,  I believe I'm only allowed to work 20h per week and this should be student jobs?

 

No, as a non-EU student you are allowed to work 120 days or 240 half days.

 

Quote

Are these on a comparable nature to a full time job prospects?

 

Usually not. Try to work as an engineer, that earns you more.

 

 

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Am I allowed to look for / consider full time job while being a full time student on a student visa? If I do land a job can my student visa be converted to a blue card ?

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1 hour ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

No, as a non-EU student you are allowed to work 120 days or 240 half days.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Frayfruit what I meant was , while being on a student visa , if I get a full time position as a Project manger with a good salary Paakge , myself or employer eligible Apply for a blue card ? Technically I’m converting myself to full time employee while being a student.

 

its just an option B but I want make sure if it’s possible

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3 hours ago, Financepil said:

Frayfruit what I meant was , while being on a student visa , if I get a full time position as a Project manger with a good salary Paakge ,

 

Then you need to apply for another residence permit.

 

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Technically I’m converting myself

 

No, technically you can not convert yourself, the authorities need to do that.

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As already mentioned, with a student visa you can only work either 120 full days or 240 half days a year. This does not however, include student jobs as a Studentische Hilfskraft at your university (also commonly called a HiWi job). But these are often limited to around 40-80 hours a month and depend largely on funding etc.

As far as I know, there is nothing stopping you from looking for a job as a student. But as a student, you are still bound by the 120 full days or 240 half days a year limit. If you secure full time employment, you can apply for a work permit. The conditions of your job offer will determine if you can be issued a work permit or a blue card. For a blue card, there are again conditions. Ultimately however, your case can only be decided by your local AB.

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