Are you already paying using your phone?

58 posts in this topic

Google Pay launched in Germany at the beginning of July, with 3 banks:

  • N26
  • Commerzbank
  • Comdirect
  • & a ridiculous service called Boon with some ridiculous fees 

Additionally it is supposed to be available soon with:

  • LBBW / BW-Bank
  • Revolut (a British Fintech start-up with some very modern products)

 

At the end of July the Sparkassen launched their own mobile payment solution on the Google Play Store: 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.s_payment.mobiles_bezahlen 

The reviews are not really encouraging and in any event, I don't expect people that still bank with a  Sparkasse, to care about paying with their phone, but I will be happy to be proven wrong.

 

Apple Pay is expected to launch soon. I am curious to see if they will have at least one major bank more than Google at launch. 

 

 

So... who has already used any of the above services? 

Impressions?

I have been paying with my phone everywhere since the product launched, and I am very happy.

I even leave the house without my wallet sometimes. I only carry one banknote of 10 or 20 euros, plus my phone! ^_^

 

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No, and I don't plan to do so in the near future.

And no, I am not with the Sparkasse, but I recognise the potential of totally losing track of my finances, and so prefer to have everything under control, since I am on a rather tight budget.

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I use Apple Pay in the UK but I use my watch instead of my phone. I think it's the flipping bee's knees. I don't have to pull out my wallet, or my phone, just double press a button on my watch, swap to the card I want to use and move the watch towards the reader.

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I pay using my phone, comdirect visa card is attached to google pay. Been using it for years in UK.

 

I never really understand people's security concerns associated with the technology - The comdirect visa card in my wallet, with contactless technology, is always live and transmits the same card number. Compare this to Google Pay which is only 'live' when the handset is turned on and a unique code is used per transaction. I would prefer to cut up my physical cards.

 

I think contactless technology is a fantastic win for visa/mastercard. It is still normal to use cards for larger purchases and by getting into the smaller transaction market is going to increase their turnover massively. However, a lot of people are going to get into difficulties because all these small transactions will be forgotten but they still add up.

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11 hours ago, Smaug said:

I use Apple Pay in the UK but I use my watch instead of my phone. I think it's the flipping bee's knees. I don't have to pull out my wallet, or my phone, just double press a button on my watch, swap to the card I want to use and move the watch towards the reader.

 

I would love that but no watch ever survived more than a few months with me, as its touch feels really weird on my skin and I tend to adjust it up and down my wrist all the time. 

But I've been thinking to give a new smartwatch a try.

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Apple-Chef Tim Cook hat auf einer Analysten-Konferenz noch für dieses Jahr den Start von Apple Pay angekündigt. Die Deutsche Bank, die Hypovereinsbank, die Smartphone-Bank N26, die Hanseatic Bank, die Fidor Bank und die App Boon sind als deutsche Projektpartner bereits bekannt. 

 

So Apple should launch soon with 2 of the big banks that Google did not have at launch, Deutsche and HVB.

Let's see if they will be available on Google Pay soon, or if they prefer to be Apple-exclusive.0

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I will not use these services at all. I pay cash for all small amounts. This is Germany, where cash is king. :). Fraud always increases with these new technologies. You only need one whizzkid.

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I try to use cash as much as possible.

All the new phone based micropayment apps are prone to skimming and hacks!

 

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All this is good until you realize that someone gave you a counterfeit 50-euro bill.

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20 minutes ago, lewton said:

All this is good until you realize that someone gave you a counterfeit 50-euro bill.

 

Hasn't happened to me in 60 yrs. Would still rather be out a 50 than having someone accessing my accounts.

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Well, I haven't (consciously at least) taken or passed bad money yet.

However, one of my credit cards was skimmed and misused the other day, so I had to contact the bank and Amazon (bunch of Romanian idiots paying for Prime from my card number) to get the charges reversed.

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1 hour ago, Metall said:

Well, I haven't (consciously at least) taken or passed bad money yet.

However, one of my credit cards was skimmed and misused the other day, so I had to contact the bank and Amazon (bunch of Romanian idiots paying for Prime from my card number) to get the charges reversed.

 

Are you using the skimming as an argument for cash or against it?

Because it is absolutely an argument against cash.


Your card was skimmed when you inserted it in a compromised ATM (by the way, you can minimize this risk by always using the ATMs inside a bank, because this mostly happens with ATMs that are out in the street). 
The more you use cash, the more often you have to use an ATM, therefore the higher the risk to have your card skimmed. Alternatively you can withdraw money less often if you withdraw large amounts, which increases the damage in case of theft. 

 

On the contrary, when you pay with your phone, there is absolutely no risk of having it skimmed. Then you need less cash and as a result you will have to withdraw cash less often.

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No, this was a US card I don't use to draw cash, but to make unavoidable online payments. Think insurance, government etc.

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On 8/4/2018, 9:39:34, Metall said:

No, this was a US card I don't use to draw cash, but to make unavoidable online payments. Think insurance, government etc.

 

On 8/4/2018, 9:51:25, Metall said:

...and while I was typing the above, German radio (B5 Computernachrichten) reported the ringleaders of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbanak , a group of on online criminals breaking into the systems and phones of banks/their employees have been arrested.

 

https://www.br.de/radio/b5-aktuell/sendungen/online-nachrichten/index.html

 

To be honest, I fail to see any relevance with mobile payments.

You are just sharing technophobic material trying to prove your initial claim, that " the new phone based micropayment apps are prone to skimming and hacks!".

 

Regarding the first part, you say your card was skimmed when you used it on-line. Hardly anything to do with whether you pay in a store with cash, a card, or your phone. 

If you don't want your card to be skimmed on-line, then stop using it on-line. :lol: Next time you want to fly, call Lufthansa and ask if you can pay in cash. ;)

 

Regarding the second part, it says that some banks' systems were hacked. 

Well, if you want to be safe from that, you should transfer your money to a bank that is not connected to the Internet. What do you say? There is no such bank? Really, I wouldn't guess. ^_^

If you want to be safe from people hacking your bank's systems, the only thing you can do is keep all your savings under the mattress. Banks will always be connected and hackers will always try to break into their systems. It might make sense to try to choose a bank with better IT departments, but you have no idea what is happening behind closed doors. 

Telling us that it is unsafe to use cards or mobile payments because the bank's systems might be hacked by people via the Internet is like avoiding to eat kebab because your uncle died of his peanut allergy (yes, this stupid).

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1 hour ago, fraufruit said:

@Metall

 

It appears that you are not allowed to voice an opinion on this thread.

 

Sucks, huh?

 

How about voicing an argument? :rolleyes:

 

For example you, Ms Fruit, do you feel safe from hackers hacking your bank's systems because you only pay for your groceries in cash?

Like really, do you?

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21 minutes ago, lewton said:

do you feel safe from hackers hacking your bank's systems because you only pay for your groceries in cash?

Like really, do you?

 

Who said I pay in cash?

 

One thing I don't do is carry a mobile with me every time I leave the house. That already makes me weird.

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People always go to extreme false premise with stock phrases  involving extreme ideas (hackers and what not).     An attack on a bank system is not actually related to a process in a supermarket.   Basic process theory is that more steps in a process makes it open to more risk.  (But otoh there is an alternative risk e.g. losing cash - that would be actually what any reason to rationalise electronic payment being OK, that other methods have different risk, not what the bank level controls are).

 

I will leave my bank to manage its systems.   I have my own profession.   I'm not interested in how my supermarket secures its products so they don't get poison put in them, or whatever.   I'm not interested in how the local bus companies train their drivers.  How I conduct my daily business is something else.   Different choices.  Unrelated.

 

I don't take my mobile out usually either or pay electronically.   I simply do not need to do either.  It's not "weird".   But there's often big demographics around that (age, lifestyle and such).  I am typical of the person who probably won't do it.  But - here's the thing.  I get that people are different.  Everyone's got their own view of risk, and personal risk set ups.  I don't rage against people who do routine things differently or spend time building straw men or putting words in people's mouths about how they should be different, or what they do is wrong.   

 

I said this on that Rewe thread.  When tech companies have people raging about whether the tech they are trying to force into our daily lives makes so many people devote so much thinking to it, that's proof there's an issue.  The rest of us just go shopping, while part of the population apparently seethes in rage about our chosen (different) payment method.

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