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Is it very hard to find a job in Germany while I'm not in Germany?

21 posts in this topic

How do people get a visa and find a job in Germany?

Having relatives in Germany?

Investment way?

Marrying a German guy?

Studying there?

Transfer?

Or just post a CV in German job market?

I don't know which way is more realistic and suitable for me.

I do want to hear guys' stories around here.

Please help.

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Depends on a lot of factors, but what's most important is what sort of education/vocational training you have and what sort of work experience, as well as what sort of job you're looking for.

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I am not aware of a visa in Germany based on having relatives unless you had a German parent or grandparent and might be entitled to citizenship.

 

I am not aware of any investment visa but if there is, I think you'd need a shitload of money to invest.

 

Marrying a German is one way of getting a visa if you have a German handy that you can marry.  Having a German baby with a German can also get you a visa here.

 

Studying is definitely one option.  There is also a visa for freelance English teachers but many have said that the market is pretty much saturated and it's hard to make a living doing that.  Getting a job and a work permit depends on your skills and the job market.  If you have skills or education that not many Germans have and you have employers lining up to hire you, it should be easy enough.

 

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I was able to land a job while still living in the US but it took some time.

 

The way I worked it, was to plan trips to Germany for a week or two, and in my cover letter for the application, I told them I would **be** in Germany from xxx - yyy and this turned everything around.  Prior to that I had a practically non-existent response rate, but when I made it clear I could make myself available for on-site interviews, things really picked up.  I was able to load up each trip with 5 or more second round interviews (phone screens were already completed) and at that point it was just a matter of time and travel to land something decent. 

 

once the job contract is in hand, the permits follow

 

HOWEVER, I am a software engineer with 15 years of experience at the time, and as an American I could apply for the permits after I had arrived in Germany.  I have no idea how complicated your case might be, what your skills are, etc.  so who knows?

 

 

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Its easy enough in principle for people to get a job seeker visa and come to germany to look for work.

 

Generally Id agree with most of the posters on this thread and say that its hard to get taken seriously as an applicant from far away and life gets much easier if you are in the same city (not just the same country) as the job.  But it is possible, depending on qualifications etc to get work from overseas, about 1 in ten of our new employees comes directly from another country.

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the point of telling them I'd be in Germany during xxx-yyy was to give them a general time frame.  Of course I arranged specific dates and I traveled to meet them in their city.

 

I wasn't in the habit of planning fixed dates to visit cities for no reason.  I didn't run into a single employer who didn't understand that concept.

 

This approach worked just fine.

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As others said- depends on your qualifications, what job you are looking for, and whether it is something that cannot be filled by an EU citizen.

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17 hours ago, Conquistador said:

Depends on a lot of factors, but what's most important is what sort of education/vocational training you have and what sort of work experience, as well as what sort of job you're looking for.

Thanks, my friend.

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14 hours ago, LeonG said:

I am not aware of a visa in Germany based on having relatives unless you had a German parent or grandparent and might be entitled to citizenship.

 

I am not aware of any investment visa but if there is, I think you'd need a shitload of money to invest.

 

Marrying a German is one way of getting a visa if you have a German handy that you can marry.  Having a German baby with a German can also get you a visa here.

 

Studying is definitely one option.  There is also a visa for freelance English teachers but many have said that the market is pretty much saturated and it's hard to make a living doing that.  Getting a job and a work permit depends on your skills and the job market.  If you have skills or education that not many Germans have and you have employers lining up to hire you, it should be easy enough.

 

Till now, I also think studying is the most realistic way for me. I need to think about it more.

Thank you, my friend.

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12 hours ago, lisa13 said:

I was able to land a job while still living in the US but it took some time.

 

The way I worked it, was to plan trips to Germany for a week or two, and in my cover letter for the application, I told them I would **be** in Germany from xxx - yyy and this turned everything around.  Prior to that I had a practically non-existent response rate, but when I made it clear I could make myself available for on-site interviews, things really picked up.  I was able to load up each trip with 5 or more second round interviews (phone screens were already completed) and at that point it was just a matter of time and travel to land something decent. 

 

once the job contract is in hand, the permits follow

 

HOWEVER, I am a software engineer with 15 years of experience at the time, and as an American I could apply for the permits after I had arrived in Germany.  I have no idea how complicated your case might be, what your skills are, etc.  so who knows?

 

 

This is the most detailed story I've ever heard!

Thank you so much! It helps a lot!

15 years experience on software engineer? Wow~!

I know people work in IT field would be much easier to find a job in Germany.

I work in that area too, but I'm quite an amateur comparing to you... let me think about it.

Thanks again!

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8 hours ago, catjones said:

Is it very hard to find a job in China while I'm not in China?

I really have no idea.

But what I know is that "it's much easier for German people come to China than Chinese people go to Germany".

I have a German friend. Her reason/visa for coming to China got me surprised...

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7 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

Its easy enough in principle for people to get a job seeker visa and come to germany to look for work.

 

Generally Id agree with most of the posters on this thread and say that its hard to get taken seriously as an applicant from far away and life gets much easier if you are in the same city (not just the same country) as the job.  But it is possible, depending on qualifications etc to get work from overseas, about 1 in ten of our new employees comes directly from another country.

Hmm... I saw that in a German website. Since I've got a Master degree from a leading university in China (bachelor too), I guess I can get a "job seeker visa". But unfortunately, I'm not sure I can get a job in Germany easily.

I need to be confident, but also have to be realistic. I don't think I'm as outstanding as 1/10 of your employees, but your suggestion of "be in Germany first" does make sense! I will think about it.

Thank you so much, my friend!

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7 hours ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

Did you ask your employer for a transfer – as suggested in your last thread? 

 

Do you speak German? 

 

Yeah, I was grateful about that idea.

My company does have "transfer" opportunity, as long as you apply.

But it needs a higher level. I am not enough for that.

Of course it's still an option for me, though it takes year.

I'm just trying to find an early way. Somehow, I'm under time pressure.

 

Leider spreche ich nur ein wenig Deutsch, aber ich lerne taeglich.   :)

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6 hours ago, lisa13 said:

the point of telling them I'd be in Germany during xxx-yyy was to give them a general time frame.  Of course I arranged specific dates and I traveled to meet them in their city.

 

I wasn't in the habit of planning fixed dates to visit cities for no reason.  I didn't run into a single employer who didn't understand that concept.

 

This approach worked just fine.

Thanks again!

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6 hours ago, RedMidge said:

As others said- depends on your qualifications, what job you are looking for, and whether it is something that cannot be filled by an EU citizen.

Thank you, my friend.

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21 hours ago, LeonG said:

....

 

Marrying a German is one way of getting a visa if you have a German handy that you can marry.  Having a German baby with a German can also get you a visa here.

 

...

 

 

 

Love the idea, will any make do and do I really need a contract as I'm on pre-paid right now? :wub:

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I managed this.

I sent out my CV to as many places as I could, got some Skype interviews, and then one actual interview.

 

It's like Lisa13 said though, I told them I'm planning on relocating and will be in Germany at a specific period. I was going to go to Germany in anyway to see if I would like to live here, and did my interviews during that time.

 

I had three Skype interviews and one of those interviews resulted in an actual interview and I had two other interviews. 

I sent out between 5 - 15 CVs every day for the period before heading to Germany for the actual interviews.

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I was an American living in Switzerland and didn't have permanent job, so I had to start looking and focused on Switzerland and also Germany since I can speak German. I applied to roughly 130 jobs over the course of 4 months. I got roughly 20 interviews, most I didn't even hear back from or heard back months later. Most started with a phone or video interview. Then if it went well enough, they invited me for a personal interview. From Switzerland this was no problem though, only a few hours with the train. Once I was finally offered the contract, I had a relocation agent who did everything for the visa for me. I just had to sign a few papers. If they want you bad enough, they will make it work. If you are skilled enough also, the visa isn't a problem. (Ok but maybe for Chinese, the situation will be different than American...)

 

But don't get discouraged. In the beginning, I thought it wouldn't happen. Then I got three offers around the same time...Just keep applying. LinkedIn was the best for me. I also got good responses from Indeed.

 

Good luck!

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