Visiting the US for a few months, need insurance while there

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Hello everyone,

 

I'm living in Berlin on a student visa. I'm travelling home for the summer for a few months and while there am expecting to do some medium-risk activities such as mountain biking and hiking. I don't have health insurance in the States, and am wondering if anyone has any knowledge/experience with how traveler's insurance works for coverage when visiting  the country you have citizenship for. Does my status as US citizen in any way invalidate me for coverage (I know I could probably buy the insurance, but if/when I make a claim, could I be denied coverage because of some technicality?). Anyone have any suggestions as to what I might do? 

 

Thanks!

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You could buy a permanent travel insurance valid throughout the year with world-wide coverage incl. healthcare, luggage and legal assistance. There are different packages.  I pay €70 per annum for this myself. Also works in my home country.

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You might want to ask whoever you are insured with if they can do you a travel insurance extension.   My insurer gives me a worldwide private health insurance policy for 14 Euro (which seems pretty comprehensive but of course cannot comment on your specific aim).   It's cheap in large part because it's just health, not repatriation (often bought here separately) or the other travel risks like theft or delay.      It's OK for people like me who do not see the non-health aspects as so relevant for insurance.   

 

For me as a Briton, it's my substitute EHIC, which I am not entitled to as private, but I get to use any private care I want when back in the UK (and other EU) as well as state.

 

Obviously, for that risk you talk about, reading the small print (T&C) to ensure at least sufficient coverage is critical.  Low probability but high impact events are what we traditionally use insurance to transfer the risk of.  Evidently worth paying for.

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LukeSkywalker, 

 

Thanks for the reply, could you tell me what company you go through?

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Hi Swimmer, 

 

Thanks for the reply. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to get insurance here in Germany as I had hoped. Yes, I know I'm required to have insurance, and was wanting it, and expecting to have and pay for it, but discovered I was ineligible for public insurance coverage after I had moved my entire life here from Japan (was living/working there previously) and even had a pre-qualification letter from Barmer for the Auslanderbehorde in order to get my residency permit. I can't afford private insurance, and so now I'm walking that unhappy tightrope of the uninsured for the time I'm here. Sounds awful, and it is, but I'm American, so I'm used to it I guess? :/ 

 

Anyways, so I'm looking for temporary coverage for someone who has no coverage. Mountain biking is the most risky activity I engage in, and since Berlin is laughably flat, the most risk I'm exposed to here day-to-day is avoiding Berliner drivers and avoiding falling down the stairs when pissed. I just need some insurance while in Colorado in case of an unlikely catastrophic crash. It's mostly for my piece of mind so I can fully enjoy my trip home. 

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9 minutes ago, ejh said:

I know I'm required to have insurance, and was wanting it, and expecting to have and pay for it, but discovered I was ineligible for public insurance coverage after I had moved my entire life here from Japan (was living/working there previously) and even had a pre-qualification letter from Barmer for the Auslanderbehorde in order to get my residency permit. I can't afford private insurance, and so now I'm walking that unhappy tightrope of the uninsured for the time I'm here. Sounds awful, and it is, but I'm American, so I'm used to it I guess? :/ 

You are required to have health insurance in order to live here and going without is putting your status in Germany in jeopardy. If you can't afford health insurance, you can't afford to live here.

Try contacting @Starshollow or @john g. for a quote. 

 

 

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18 minutes ago, ejh said:

since Berlin is laughably flat, the most risk I'm exposed to here day-to-day is avoiding Berliner drivers and avoiding falling down the stairs when pissed.

 

Do you really think that these are the only health issues that you might have???

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Fraufruit, 

No, of course not. I could come down with cancer. You don't need to tell me to be nervous. I get it. Thanks. 

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Englechen,

 

Thanks for the suggestion. I already conferred with them both about a year ago. They were incredibly helpful and did their best, but were unable to get public insurance for me unfortunately. I understand the risks to both my visa status, but have no choice at this point.

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Again englechen, thanks,  I'll take it under advisement.

 

Listen, maybe you could contact Barmer for me and ask them to not renege on promises they've made that people use to base hugely expensive life choices on? Thanks, I'm sure they'll listen to you. 

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what the hell is your issue, @ejh

 

don't like it when someone tells you the truth?  do you think you're extra special and have a stay in the country free card based on this "terrible" twist of fate that you were not eligible for public cover (and who told you you would be, on a student permit?)

 

Regardless of your ability to get into a kasse, you always have the option to go private. You could, even now! 

 

quit being snotty.  get your things in order.

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1 hour ago, fraufruit said:

 

Do you really think that these are the only health issues that you might have???

 

Indeed.  Two days in my bit of Berlin and I'm about ready for hospital.  Eaten up by aggressive biting flies, and god knows what they put in the water (which I am not totally convinced should be brown in colour) but my insides certainly notice it :rolleyes:.

 

EDIT - On this matter of local insurance, assuming you are fit, there's no reason to assume a private policy will be much more than a Krankenkasse, which costs a minimum of 1800 Euro or whatever it is now.  Healthcare's always gonna cost you at least that sum here (albeit an employer will fund half).  And we get tax deuctions and possibly rebates etc.   

 

Germany's a high income nation / high welfare and a couple of grand is not "hugely expensive" here.  It's typical living cost.   That's the deal we make for the welfare and the prospects.   If we want a low income life with low welfare, there's plenty of nations we can have that...but not this one, it's not sustainable.  

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2 hours ago, ejh said:

Listen, maybe you could contact Barmer for me and ask them to not renege on promises they've made that people use to base hugely expensive life choices on? Thanks, I'm sure they'll listen to you. 

 

I just looked at your previous posts (as well as my answers) and I can't really be bothered to try and help you anymore. I already warned you that your plan would be expensive.

 

5 hours ago, ejh said:

Does my status as US citizen in any way invalidate me for coverage (I know I could probably buy the insurance, but if/when I make a claim, could I be denied coverage because of some technicality?).

 

I just wanted to point out that many German travel insurances are designed for legal German residents and assumes an underlying comprehensive health insurance that will pick up part of the tab. If you buy a German travel insurance and then try to make a large claim, they'll want to know about your underlying German health insurance. Furthermore, if a smart lawyer gets a look at the file, he  might think to question whether or not you are even legally resident here.

 

Quote

Anyone have any suggestions as to what I might do?

 

Leave Germany.

 

 

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2 hours ago, ejh said:

I'm living in Berlin on a student visa.

How did you manage to enroll at the university without a supporting document proving that you've got a valid health insurance?

 

Are you living in Germany with a student visa, but not really studying?

 

 

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47 minutes ago, engelchen said:

I just looked at your previous posts (as well as my answers) and I can't really be bothered to try and help you anymore.

 

yeah that is an eyeful.

 

 

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1 hour ago, franklan said:

How did you manage to enroll at the university without a supporting document proving that you've got a valid health insurance?

 

 

2 hours ago, ejh said:

had a pre-qualification letter from Barmer for the Auslanderbehorde in order to get my residency permit.

 

They ABH accepted the letter and didn't follow up (although in Berlin they just usually ask for proof of continuous health insurance from the time the previous permit was issued). Since they sometimes also include a Nebenbestimmung that the permit is only valid as long as the holder has health insurance, his permit might no longer be valid.

 

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but in the original thread he was working with TK - no mention of Barmer

 

I need to go find some air freshener...it's getting stinky in here

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