Hessian dialect

11 posts in this topic

Anyone come across words in hessian dialect that seem to be unknown outside of, well, Hesse?

 

I’m thinking of “larchen” (I don’t know the spelling because I couldn’t find anything on line).

 

I've heard it in two contexts, as an idiom for “just waltzing in” and as a word for feet spreading out in (new) shoes... anyone got a reference?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Larchen I don't know.  Are you referring to the tree?

 

This could be said overall in Germany.  I recall in Aschaffenburg, which has a Hessisch dialect or sorts, 'Quetsche' (Zwetschegen ) Kuchen.  Dialects are so common here.

 

In the Allgäu, especially in the Oberallgäu it is truly difficult sometimes.  Traveling a short distance of 12km the dialect becomes completely different.  Moreover, the dialect here is so extreme, it is truly a second language to German. 

 

Butzele - small child

Förgge - cleaning / washing

Mesmars Buind  - Cemetery

 

Often odd...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Die Laatsche and laatschen?

 

http://www.kasselwiki.de/index.php?title=W%C3%B6rterbuch_der_niederhessischen_Mundart,_I_%E2%80%93_L

 

Laatsche f., Laatschen m. ● ,aus Lappen zusammengenähter oder aus zerschnittenen Salbenden geflochtener Schuh‘, sehr üblich, ganz Hessen (Vil. 1868); Latsche f. ,Schuh aus Salbenden, worin man latschig geht; schlunziges Frauenzimmer‘ (Pfs. 1886); Laatschen m. ,schiefer, ausgetretener Schuh‘, auch scherzhaft oder verächtlich für ,Schuh‘, Kassel 19., 20. Jh. (Gr.); Laadschen (nur Plur.), ,schiefe, ausgetretene Schuhe‘, Oberellenbach (Hm. 1926). ● Siehe Letschen.

laatschen ● ,wackelnd und schleppend gehen‘ (Vil. 1868); ,langsam, nachlässig, schleppend gehen‘, Kassel 19., 20. Jh. (Gr. 1894); laadschen ,sich nachlässig, schleppend fortbewegen‘, Oberellenbach (Hm. 1926).

laatschen ● ,eine Ohrfeige verpassen‘, Kassel 19., 20. Jh. (Gr. 1894); laadschen, dasselbe, Oberellenbach (Hm. 1926). ● Ich laadsch dä eine (eenge) ,ich gebe dir eine Ohrfeige‘, Kassel 20. Jh., Oberellenbach (Hm. 1926).

 

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stolen from a topic from 2004

 

This is the ultimate Hessisch-English Dictionary for all English speaking people intending to make a business trip to Frankfurt and get lost somewhere between the Airport and Sachsenhausen.

 

A

Anner... The other one

B

Babba... Father

Babbele... to speak

Babbisch ... sticky

Balmegadde ... Famous botanical garden

wie bei de Hembels unnerm Sofa... Colloquial: legendary place that everybody knows but nobody has ever seen

beleidischd Lebberworscht ... Sensitive person

Bembel ... Jug for famous Hessian beverage

Bobbelsche... Little child, baby

Bosse mache... to do something stupid

Brunze... to urinate

Bummbe... to beat, hit

D

Dasch... Bag, pocket

Der geht ran wie de Flocki ans Gehaggte... Not very shy person

Des zischt wie Abbelsaft... "that fizzles like apple juice"

Dibbe... Pot

Dibbemess'... Frankfurt public festival

Dollbohrer... Awkward person also known as "Hannebambel"

Dorschenanner... A big mess

dozze lasse ... to drop something

dribbe ... over there

druff... up there

Dubbe... blot of paint; also: to be somewhat dull

Dummbabbler... Someone who talks too much.

Similar to: "Sabbelschnuut"

E

Ebbel... Apple

Ebbelwoi... famous Hessian beverage

Enuff... up

Enunner... down

Erbaame! Zu spät! Die Hesse komme! ... Hessian National Anthem

F

Fuddele ... to work not very accurately

G

Geknoddel... Total mess

Grädediersche... Small fish

Grie Soß... Popular Frankfurt dish cucumber

Gugge ... to watch

Guuuude ... Hello, nice to see you!

Ei Guuuude wiie? ... Hello, nice to see you! How are you today?

Wo meschste hie?... Where are you going?

Guutsje... Candy

H

Häusje... Small house, hut

Hauptwach ... Frankfurt Times Square

Herr uff ... Stop! Similar to: “Mooomendemal"

Hessisch-Kongo ... Area south of Darmstadt

Hessisch-Sibirie... Area north of Giessen

Hibbe... over there; to jump

Hibbelisch... nervous

Hinkel ... Chicken

Hogge... to sit

Horschemol! ... Listen!

K

Kaan Bock net ... unmotivated

Kaff... Small town

Kerrnsche... Small car

Kipp... Cigarette

Klaa... small

L

Labbe ... Washcloth

Lebbe geht weider... Hessian motto like "Don't worry, be happy"

Lebbern... to drink

Lumbeseggel... Furtive person

M

Mobbelsche... Not even skinny person. Similar to:"Pummelsche"

N

Naggisch ... naked

Nippes... Useless things

O

Offebach... Frankfurt Bronx

P

Petze... to drink

Plärre... to cry

S

Sabber... Saliva

Schnalle ... to understand; also colloquial for female

Schnegge tschegge... To watch nice girls

Schnibbelsche... Little piece

Schnuggelsche... Candy; cute girl

Schnuuud ... Mouth

Schodder... cash, money

Schwanger Lersch... Fat (female) person

sisch ablesche... to go to sleep

Simbel ... Simpleton

Stinkwatz... Smelly person

U

Uffgeblase ... arrogant

Uffrabbele... to get up; to pull oneself together

Uffschnitt ... all Hessian sausages, starting with an "u"

V

Veraaasche ... to make fun of someone

W

Wutz... Pig; dirty person

Z

Zeil ... Broadway in Frankfurt

Zuggerschneggsche... Sweet round biscuits; also: pet name for girlfriend

 

Popular Hessian Phrases:

***********************

Unn? ... What's goin' on?

Kumm Hoiner, steck der a o ... Do you want to smoke, Henrik?

Was hattan da de Babba da? ... What has the father in his hand?

Aasch glaab s gehd lous!... Are you nuts?

Prodoneworscht ... Bread without meat

Du ahle Babbsagg! ... You suck!

Hä ? ... Excuse me Sir, could you please be so kind to

... repeat your statement. I couldn't hear you well

Mer waases net. ... We don't know.

Des is abber babbisch! ... This is a little sticky!

Die hat do en Dubbe!... She is nuts!

Mer laaft de brieh de stern enunnee ... Sweat is running down my face.

Heit brennt de Planeeet widder... It's really hot today.

Uffgebassd! ... Pay attention!

Isch werd rischtisch rammdoesisch ... I'm feeling kind of weird

Kenndisch graad verriggd werrn! ... I'm going mad

Ooch gee haahm! ... Be off with you, you foolish person!

Isch mach weida... Good bye.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sos-the-rope said:

I’m thinking of “larchen” (I don’t know the spelling because I couldn’t find anything on line).

 

I've heard it in two contexts, as an idiom for “just waltzing in” and as a word for feet spreading out in (new) shoes... anyone got a reference?

 

@snowingagain is right on track but maybe in the wrong region, Nordhessisch being about as close to Sudhessisch as Frankish to Bayrisch or Schwäbisch to Badisch - at least to the non-local listener.

 

Given time to acclimatize I have been known to follow convos and even stand-up routines in all of the above but I never tried to aquire any of them, for fear of not being understood elsewhere in Joymany.  B)

 

A variety of Sudhessisch is spoken here in Rheinhessen or Rhoihesse as my landlord says.

 

Laadschen - n. pl., mountain pines

- n. pl., slippers, worn casual shoes

- v., shuffle along, traipse, slouch around,

 

I know this coz he sometimes mocks my old trainers or house-shoes (although he'd be referring to my gait too whenever one of my disks slips out). :lol:

 

In the Rhein-Main region you'd have to go to an outlying small village and find some elderly folk to hear Sudhessisch spoken as it would have been before TV became popular in the 1960s. Thanks to the Hessischer Rundfunk's "Blaue Bock" show having been broadcast by ARD 1 Saturday a month for about 35 years the Nordhesse (and maybe the Ost- and Westhesse too) said what they heard was "Fernseherhessisch" or "Äbbelwoihessisch". If you hear anyone in Frankfurt under 50 speaking real Hessisch nowadays they're almost certain to be a visitor.

 

That's a terrific translation list, @Tap especially since its direct to English.

 

Frankfurt Verkehrs Gesellschaft (FFM public transport) who run the famous mobile tourist attraction to Sachsenhausen the Ebbelwoi Express have a similar Hochdeutsch> Hessischtrainer.

 

On this site you can get a mobile app Hochdeutsch>Sudhessisch which they say works without the internet. Its supposed to translate in real time as you type but I can't test that so don't know if its true. Der Iwwersedser | Hochdeutsch - Sudhessisch Translator

 

2Babbel od net2Babbl - des ish de Fraache

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a kid, I only learned Hessisch.  Around the late 70's, the younger generation in our family switched to Hochdeutsch. Most confusing for me. Oma and Opa didn't change though....'Gemmal her kend, zarsh mir da schee bop '...Come here kid, show me you nice doll. 

 

I still remember all that and have some funny conversations with our older neighbours.  Must sound like the equivalent of a cockney with a German accent!

 

Is it a Hessisch thing to not differentiate the Artikel? In our family everything was just d...d Katz, d Hund. Easy then though I guess I'll never get it right now. 

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, sos-the-rope said:

Anyone come across words in hessian dialect that seem to be unknown outside of, well, Hesse?

 

I’m thinking of “larchen” (I don’t know the spelling because I couldn’t find anything on line).

 

I've heard it in two contexts, as an idiom for “just waltzing in” and as a word for feet spreading out in (new) shoes... anyone got a reference?

 

I only know 2 variations...shoes, 'zie amal da larchen aus' take your shoes off.  Or walking, 'wir larchen durchem Wald'. Also, dappe for walking, 'lass uns mal rube dappe' 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I speak Hessisch.   One of the big promoters of it in recent times is the now higher profile football club here, where it's in regular use, demonstrating the club's background.   And the club's visual identity is the heraldic lily, as also used historically and still for the state, so there's a very visible link, that they promote.  They carry a permanent "we're from Hesse" stamp.

 

Uffstich (or similar) was the branding of two recent promotions  (Aufstieg).   Not quite so familiar with its opposite, which we blank from our minds and would definitely not produce commemorative t-shirts for :lol:.    One of the other stock references is Dieser Dorscht (Durst - thirst, so metaphorically hunger or desire in a sports context).

 

One of the better-known Darmstädter(in)s is Andrea Petkovic, tennis player, super smart and well-read woman, and she certainly uses it on twitter.

 

The first German I learned was Austrian so I had to relearn basics like Erdapfel is Kartoffel here.

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, snowingagain said:

Die Laatsche and laatschen?

 

http://www.kasselwiki.de/index.php?title=W%C3%B6rterbuch_der_niederhessischen_Mundart,_I_%E2%80%93_L

 

Laatsche f., Laatschen m. ● ,aus Lappen zusammengenähter oder aus zerschnittenen Salbenden geflochtener Schuh‘, sehr üblich, ganz Hessen (Vil. 1868); Latsche f. ,Schuh aus Salbenden, worin man latschig geht; schlunziges Frauenzimmer‘ (Pfs. 1886); Laatschen m. ,schiefer, ausgetretener Schuh‘, auch scherzhaft oder verächtlich für ,Schuh‘, Kassel 19., 20. Jh. (Gr.); Laadschen (nur Plur.), ,schiefe, ausgetretene Schuhe‘, Oberellenbach (Hm. 1926). ● Siehe Letschen.

laatschen ● ,wackelnd und schleppend gehen‘ (Vil. 1868); ,langsam, nachlässig, schleppend gehen‘, Kassel 19., 20. Jh. (Gr. 1894); laadschen ,sich nachlässig, schleppend fortbewegen‘, Oberellenbach (Hm. 1926).

laatschen ● ,eine Ohrfeige verpassen‘, Kassel 19., 20. Jh. (Gr. 1894); laadschen, dasselbe, Oberellenbach (Hm. 1926). ● Ich laadsch dä eine (eenge) ,ich gebe dir eine Ohrfeige‘, Kassel 20. Jh., Oberellenbach (Hm. 1926).

 

 

Wow, this could be it! And it combines swaggering gaits with expanding shoes. Who knew?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, emkay said:

 

I only know 2 variations...shoes, 'zie amal da larchen aus' take your shoes off.  Or walking, 'wir larchen durchem Wald'. Also, dappe for walking, 'lass uns mal rube dappe' 

 

Yup, that would be it.

 

so the word is about crappy shoes and lazy walking. Like it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/9/2018, 12:25:31, emkay said:

 

I only know 2 variations...shoes, 'zie amal da larchen aus' take your shoes off.  Or walking, 'wir larchen durchem Wald'. Also, dappe for walking, 'lass uns mal rube dappe' 

 

The latter is easy to remember for us Brits who experienced sports lessons in daps as kids.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now