Tips on renting an apartment in Berlin

94 posts in this topic

Hi there!

 

We have just found a flat in Berlin as we are moving there next week. Some general advice: if possible I would try to give longer than three days to look.

 

My boyfriend filled in applications for a couple but it has been down to the landlord to go through the applications and select who they want, and we weren't picked for one but got the other. But the landlord took quite a few days to decide as he had a few applicants.

 

If we hadn't got the flat that we did, then Room with a Loo (English speaking service) had sent us details of flats that they had to let on a more short term basis so we could then look for something more permanent once we were there.

 

We also found that some agents advertised having lots of flats in certain areas then said that they didn't have anything at the moment when he rang.

 

Good luck with your search!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Saturday Berliner Zeitung has the most comprehensive listings.

 

We found a flat as a 'nachmeiter', taking over someone else's lease, and because the people moving out liked us, they put us at the top of the list.

 

Otherwise, the first name on the list that passes the credit check should get the flat, although I'm sure landlords ignore this and give the flat to the person with the best credit.

 

Anyway, there is such a housing glut in Berlin you shouldn't have a problem finding someplace nice and relatively cheap.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Out of interest, what are the rents like in Berlin right now? Im talking about modern, or at least, fully renovated flats, 2 to 3 room. Not interested in any unrenovierte altbau, no matter how cheap (had enough of that when I used to live in Berlin).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in a renovated altbau, wood floors, balcony, 2 rooms at 64 sq meters. We pay just under 400 euro warm.

 

That's in Teptow a block away from the park and river on a quite side street full of protected buildings. 10 minute walk to the ring s-bahn, or just around the corner from the bus. You can be at Alex in 20 minutes, or walk to Kreuzberg along the river in 10.

 

When I tell people in the states this, they don't believe me,

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The flat that we got is 95 sqm, 3 rooms and 900 warm, which compared to what we have been paying for a one bedroomed flat in the UK (650 pounds with council tax and all bills on top) is a bargain. However compared to Ami's place it is shockingly expensive!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your's is 1/3 bigger, though.

 

What area are you in? Treptow is still a bargin, although in the past year or so it's become more popular.

 

A similar flat in Seattle would have cost me easily twice as much.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its in the dreaded, pretentious Prenzlauer Berg as boyfriend can quickly get to work from there! Which might account for the price hike. And we needed the spare room for family invasions - I think we are going to see more of them when we are there than we have here.

Is Seattle really expensive for the US now? I know many people who would love to move over to the US and Canada (rather than have the language barriers of Europe) for a better quality of life than here.

My old housemate came from Seattle and was horrified at the nasty shared house she had signed up for over the internet. She thought for the price that she was going somewhere nice!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I live in a renovated altbau, wood floors, balcony, 2 rooms at 64 sq meters. We pay just under 400 euro warm. ... When I tell people in the states this, they don't believe me,

They dont believe you in London either. Or pretty well anywhere else in Britain for that matter.

 

When I first moved to Berlin back in 1990 I paid just 220 DM (about 110 Euros) a month warm for a 2 room flat, first in Friedrichshain, and then in Köpenick. In the mid 90s rents had risen and I was paying 440 Marks, about 600 DM warm for a 2 room in Prenzlauer Berg. Now Im in Frankfurt and pay double that for the same space. Admittedly quality and location much better. And nice not to have grafitti and dogshit outside your front door.

 

(Thats Frankfurt am Main, not Oder)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we have just returned from a 4 day flat hunt in berlin and we did all the wrong things and went to all the wrong places for 3 days and on the 4th day found something semi-civilized but missed the responsable person to sign the papers.

It was a real nightmare as beginners in berlin we were really lost. My husband starts at the charite in october - probably without us - what i find strange is that the charite offers no relocation service. any tips from anyone would be great as we are now looking at a case of sending my husband flat hunting on his weekends!

atleast we know which areas are safe and where not to go!

Everyone says don not go and pay commision to an estate agent as there are so many empty flats but we get the feeling it would maybe be better?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Relocation service?! It`s - eastern - Berlin, not Los Angeles.

 

You could also try the weekend edition of Berliner Morgenpost which has a big immobilien section. I think you can also access the apartments to let database pages on the web as well, which makes searching much easier, since you can enter search criteria like number of rooms, maximum rent and of course area.

 

good luck!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes for sure it is just berlin and not los angeles but when you have a family and get a job in such a well known hospital as the charite you would just think a little help would be offered - ok not the whole thing but a few tips atleast would have saved alot of stress, after all they want their employees to be able to start fresh and relaxed and not exhausted and stressed!

will try to get hold of the berlin zeitung even though we are far away, maybe the station has it.

One tip for any travelling to berlin - we checked out of our hotel to return home by train and wanted to wait 3 hours at the zoo bahnhof but some one said to go to ostbahnhof instead and it was really great there, new and clean unlike zoo , kids thought they were at an airport!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree a large organisation which is staff-intensive like a big hospital in a big city should provide at least some assistance, some clue trails if nothing else. When I moved to Berlin in 1990 things were very different. Lived there 7 years, for 3 years I lived near the Ostbahnhof (Hauptbahnhof as it was called then), just off Karl-Marx-Allee. 100 euros a month for 60 sq m. Those were the days...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi all!

i'm in the us and will be moving to berlin in a month or two; my husband is already there and he should be looking for apartments, but he doesn't speak any german, so i'm going to have to look up ads from here and just give him phone numbers to call.

 

so, the questions:

- where's the best place to look for ads? i've been told, the berliner morgenpost website? is that it?

- what's Warmwasservers. nicht zentral?

- is the only way to find out if the kitchen is installed to call and ask or is it safe to assume that it isn't if the ad doesn't say anything?

- i've always thought that p-berg was more expensive than k-berg, but now that i'm looking at ads, it seems like prices are about the same, is my impression right? we're kind of on a budget. or are the cost differences visible for shopping and other expenses rather than the actual rent? i hear there's a lot of young families in prenzlauberg, would this be a better neighborhood to move into with a baby?

 

i'll probably come up with more questions later and ask them here...but i'll be grateful if anyone can answer these!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi

 

have been here in friedrichain for a while and although not the best place it is cheaper than Prenzlauberg you can try the official websites like WBM or besowgo or stadtundland because this is the basic housing companies here also you could find someone who speaks english also here are some tips try zentralheizung means central heating wasserversorgen mean the type of water used this goes under betreibskosten mainly things like streetcleaning rbish collecting and also water supplies this is all figured out by the housing company what you must look for it warmmiete as this is what it is after betreibskosts have been included kaltmiete is normally without betreibskosten also do not go for a staffelmiete as this means the housing company can also increase the rent when they want also you should think about where the area is trendy areas will obviously cost more ie prenzlauer berg,mitte,or parts of friedrichain look for the extra costs as well also some landlords won't take families DON'T ASK :huh:

 

any more questions?

 

bye

richard

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

wasserversorgen mean the type of water used

well that's what i'm trying to figure out, what type would that be? basically my only concern is having hot water around the clock, i lived in berlin for four months two years ago and for some odd reason we had no hot water at night and i want to avoid that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now