What do foreigners like about Britain?

73 posts in this topic

On 22.5.2018, 19:42:00, cybil said:

Plaid. I love plaid. Tweed too. But not wool. Wool gives me a rash. I think plaid and tweeds are 'British' at least. 

 

Tweed is made of wool. If by plaid, you are referring to tartan, that is wool too.

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On 5/23/2018, 10:38:18, kapokanadensis said:

I visited Britain for the second time after my first two years living in Germany, and at the time it was such a breath of fresh air - politeness!  Friendliness!  Small talk at the shops!  The border guard congratulated me on my birthday before asking me the obligatory questions, and then it was pleasant encounters the rest of the time over there.  Plus, we went to Devon, which is one of the most beautiful places I have ever been to.  So, narrow touristy perspective on an entire country, but I like Britain, and I could certainly picture living there.  My sister lives there and really enjoys it, finds it superior in a lot of ways to where we grew up in Canada.  I've been back a couple of times since, and always enjoy myself there. 

 

A sadly departed American friend of mine once flew into Heathrow with a teddy bear in his hand as a present for his daughter.

He showed his passport to the official, who let him through with the words: " sleep tight, Mr Galvin. "

🙏🏻

 

Last time I flew to Gatwick, I´d started my own journey from the village here at 3am...

Immigration guy asked me: " how are you today, sir? "

Me: " knackered...up at 3 this morning "

 

He: " so you don´t do mornings, sir ?"

:lol:Thought that was great!!!

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Beautiful tea cups and saucers, maybe only found at an affordable price at the British Charity shops/Thrift Stores. Who cares if it's a bit chipped or there are only three cups and four saucers that match? Tea tastes better in Britain. With or without sugar and milk added. Go over for a cup of tea. And buy a cup and saucer at a charity shop to do something good for British folk. 

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I went to England from America and was asked at passport control where I was heading in England, 'Weymouth.' Passport guy looked at me funny and said, 'You plan to stay in Weymouth three days? No one can find enough to do there to pass the time.' Me: 'Well, meeting a friend from Brighton there before taking a ferry to Gurnsey and Sark.' Him: 'How long you staying in the Channel Islands?' Me: 'Five days.' Him: 'That's more like it. Have a nice stay.' Stamped my passport.

 

I didn't find Weymouth a 'let down.' It was a more family oriented beach than Brighton was, almost set back in time, complete with donkey rides for kids across the sand. An American lady of very advanced years asked Brighton friend the way around, he had no clue. She was in Weymouth in search of her ancestors' old home. Some years later, I discoverd I had ancestors from Weymouth too. Maybe she was some umpteenth times removed relative of mine. We should have ridden a donkey together!

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Benjamin Britten. His operas are very difficult to sit through (I walked out on 'The Turn of the Screw') but some of his other works are a joy. 

 

Scott Polar Research Institute. The history of Britain's involvement in polar exploration is really interesting! 

 

Bethlem Royal Hospital, Museum of the Mind. A kind archivist surprised me by giving me large books full of late Victorian patients' health records, some with a photo of the person, to explore on a very rainy day. I'd gone to see art by Richard Daad and left with so many sad tales of people of long ago who had spent time in the most famous mental institution in England. Left with copies of art by Louis Wain instead!

 

Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.  

 

Folklore . Are there really fairies? 

 

Arts and Crafts Movement

 

I could just go on and on. Some others take over please!

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On 24.5.2018, 17:19:21, cybil said:

Cadbury Dairy Milk Caramel and also the Peppermint one. 

Kaufland in Berlin also has it now. Also Fruit and Nut!!

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On 21/05/2018, 13:01:51, Wulfrun said:

I can barely remember what I like about Britain, I suppose I miss Real Ale and preserved steam railways more than anything else.

 

The 90s clubbing scene (Gallery@Turnmills, Renaissance@The Cross, Cream@Nation, Bedrock@Heaven, were all faves but all gone. I'd probably take someone to Fabric on a Saturday now.)

Brighton

Waitrose

Wensleydale cheese (especially with Cranberries)

Windsor

Maybe St. Albans

Kensington (especially the Wholefoods market)

Jaguar cars (2nd hand Jaguars are shockingly expensive when I have been looking on mobile.de and Autoscout, at least around the Frankfurt area, whereas UK prices are rock-bottom by comparison).

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On 24/05/2018, 17:34:04, john g. said:

A sadly departed American friend of mine once flew into Heathrow with a teddy bear in his hand as a present for his daughter.

He showed his passport to the official, who let him through with the words: " sleep tight, Mr Galvin. "

🙏🏻

 

Last time I flew to Gatwick, I´d started my own journey from the village here at 3am...

Immigration guy asked me: " how are you today, sir? "

Me: " knackered...up at 3 this morning "

 

He: " so you don´t do mornings, sir ?"

:lol:Thought that was great!!!

 

About 11 or 12 years ago, I went to London to visit my sister who was working/living there at the time (we're Canadian). After visiting her for a couple weeks, I was off to do 4ish months of travelling and bumming around in India. I had graduated a couple years before, so I think was 23 or 24?. I had spent all of the last couple years at a demanding and busy job, which I slowly came to loathe. So I quit and did this travel. 

 

Passing through Heathrow, the immigration agent asks me the standard, where I'm going, what I'm doing. I explained that I just quit my job and after visiting my sister, was off to travel around India for a few months. I had only vague plans, and responded as such. I think she asked me what I was going to do when I come back and I said 'I really don't know' or something to that effect. I remember answering a lot of questions 'hmmm, I'm not sure', etc. She was pretty bemused, made a little joke I can't remember, gave me a wink and said, well, I hope you figure it out, you have time, don't worry. Welcome to London, have a nice time, STAMP. Life advice from a immigration agent! :lol: 

 

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British comedies. Back in Canada, I grew up among others MP's Flying Circus (and the movies), Fawlty Towers, Blackadder and Mr.Bean, plus others which British friends have been surprised at, but hey that's what they randomly played (Are You Being Served?, Keeping Up Appearances...). Little Britain and Mitchell and Webb for more recents. My parents were into various murder mysteries and have been watching Coronation Street for at least 30 years (and, admittedly, I have seen many episodes too).

 

To me, it's equally Canadian, but really is British: Cadbury's dairy milk, especially mint. Mint chocolate is my kryptonite, as anyone who knows me knows. Visitors from Canada or UK are required to bring me at least one or two bars. Out in the German provinces one can find After Eight, but it isn't quite the same. My German wife has got used to it now, but at first expressed shock that anyone would want to have toothpaste flavoured chocolate (her first impressions...lol).

 

Beer, Ales. German beer is mostly of good quality, I just wish it were more diverse. I like a Weizen, but everything else is Pils or so close to it... 

 

I can do without the royals, and don't understand the fascination, not in 2018. There is some great British press, but an unimaginable amount of total trash too. This whole Brexit business and general special snowflakeness, well well... And any visitor to Britain could not fail to notice there is, uhhh, a high tolerance for public drunkenness? Not in all places, all the time, but it is there.

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On 7/31/2018, 2:59:54, Mackle said:

The 90s clubbing scene (Gallery@Turnmills, Renaissance@The Cross, Cream@Nation, Bedrock@Heaven, were all faves but all gone. I'd probably take someone to Fabric on a Saturday now.)

Wensleydale cheese (especially with Cranberries)

 

Soooo agree on that. Ah, my salad days. Flesh @ Hacienda, Burger Queen, Pod, you name it, I was probably there at some point. Not just UK&I though. Le Queen, IT etc... How I got any studying done is beyond me ;-) 

 

Freedom of Movement was my middle name back then. Brexit aside, that's a great name for a retro clubnight :-)

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14 hours ago, paulwork said:

 

Soooo agree on that. Ah, my salad days. Flesh @ Hacienda, Burger Queen, Pod, you name it, I was probably there at some point. Not just UK&I though. Le Queen, IT etc... How I got any studying done is beyond me ;-) 

 

Freedom of Movement was my middle name back then. Brexit aside, that's a great name for a retro clubnight :-)

 

I just missed out on the Hacienda. And when Sankey's reopened I never ended up going there.

 

The '90s was awesome for clubbing. I notice that Ibiza seems to have suffered the same fate as the UK, with some excellent places like DC10 and the iconic Space no longer open.

 

I'm told by people I work with that once upon a time Frankfurt had a decent house and techno scene, but it would seem that not much of that exists now either.

 

 

As for Freedom of Movement, what an excellent name for a night!! B)

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