Moving to Munich temporarily and getting an exemption to homeschool our kids

84 posts in this topic

34 minutes ago, Guest said:

 

For me it would be interesting to see how the kids‘ home schooling measures up to their German counterparts. 

 

Having the same teacher your entire life means you have only had to deal with one method of teaching, learning and authority.

 

I can answer that anecdotally: it doesnt.  Therein lies the OPs problem.

 

OP although you say this thread has a lot of topics you didnt ask for, you would be remiss to ignore it and not work it in to all of the research you have already said you have done.   People bring up things like health insurance, etc, because its germany itself that ties all of it together.  School registrations tie into taxes, residency status ties into homeschool allowances, residency status ties into insurance requirements.  This is why everyone is bringing up things that you havent asked about. 

If you think its frustrating to read about here, then my kind advice is to brace yourself because you will get it at all levels here as well.  The finanzamt will want to know about your insurance and residency, the insurance company will want to know about your taxes, the school will want to know about your insurance and certainly immigration at the airport will want to know about EVERYTHING.

 

16 hours ago, asboyds said:

 

If your kids were homeschooled for their whole life (so far), would you want to throw them into school starting in February? 

 

Since you asked: if i thought it would ever be a problem to put my kids into school at any time, then i probably wouldnt homeschool in the first place. 

 

But having said that, this is my kind advice to you, knowing what i know about German public schools, with my kids being in them the last ten years: i actually think its better to put them in midyear.  They will get a very warm welcome and it can be their integration year.  I am saying this truthfully, knowing the atmosphere in these schools: we have had kids come in to my kids classes midyear from all sorts of environments, ie. refugees who havent been to school in two years or more, kids with no german, all sorts of people who are specialler snowflakes than homeschooled kids.  It will be fine, perhaps even great.

 

Come, and do things the normal way and you will have FAR less problems.  One of the worst parts of moving to germany is when you dont fit into the mold and getting yourself into the system.  Postponing that until the beginning of the next school year will only make it rougher.  We have so many school holidays throughout the year (1 week in october, 2 weeks christmas, 1 week fasching, 2  weeks Easter, 2 weeks pfingsten, and many 4 day weekends in the spring for other local outings and road trips) that i dont think you will have any issues getting back to the States to take care of your house stuff. 

 

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Are you aware of the fact that there is a 3 tier school system in Germany and that your 12 yo may have a hard time to qualify for the medium or upper tier (Realschule, Gymnasium) without repeating one year (not that I´d see repeating a year as a problem)? You might want to discuss this with the Schulamt as well.

On another note: when I left Germany for the first time my kids were in a private elementary school. I hadn´t deregistered from Germany but kept resident status but still nobody ever asked what school they were visiting after we had left. Seems there isn´t too much enforcement of school attendance obligation going on. That was in Bavaria. So for a few months flying under the radar would probably be possible. Not that I´d recommend that though. Especially for your oldest my 2 cents are that you have no time to waste to get her fully immersed in school if you want her to live in Germany. I´d probably give her a year to pick up the language and make friends and take it from there. If you have the funds you can always sent them to an Englsih speaking school after that trial year.

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Just now, jeba said:

Are you aware of the fact that there is a 3 tier school system in Germany and that your 12 yo may have a hard time to qualify for the medium or upper tier (Realschule, Gymnasium) without repeating one year (not that I´d see repeating a year as a problem)?

 

She knows all of this. She asked one simple question: How can I continue my life of travel and freedom, even though I have school-aged children?

 

Only one person has answered this very simple question. Well, actually 2, as I answered it days ago, with the "suggestion", that they just live here illegally and under the radar, but she didn't seem to like that one.

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6 minutes ago, Guest said:

 

She knows all of this. She asked one simple question: How can I continue my life of travel and freedom, even though I have school-aged children?

 

Only one person has answered this very simple question. Well, actually 2, as I answered it days ago, with the "suggestion", that they just live here illegally and under the radar, but she didn't seem to like that one.

Well, she wouldn´t have to do it illegally. She could always register and deregister. Whether that would be a good idea is another question. If she really needs to leave Germany for 1-2 months every semester it might make more sense to have an aupair looking after the kids (the husband will still be around, after all) while she´s away rather than disrupting their school integration process.

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1 hour ago, jeba said:

Well, she wouldn´t have to do it illegally. She could always register and deregister. Whether that would be a good idea is another question. If she really needs to leave Germany for 1-2 months every semester it might make more sense to have an aupair looking after the kids (the husband will still be around, after all) while she´s away rather than disrupting their school integration process.

 

Wishful thinking.  As a non-EU you will need to apply every time you deregister for a new permit and then in and out of the health insurance, way too many problems in the slow German system..

 

 

P.S., My wife travels a lot for her job and I have to wing it alone like two thirds of the time.  It is hard but we do it with no major problems.  I send the kids in the morning to school, they stay later in the aftercare/hort (this will change after the summer, no more hort, so go home by themselves), then I pick them up, we go home, we cook, clean up, do some house chores and go to sleep.   And my kids are only 7 and 9 and they already can help with things here and there.  The OP here has a kid that is 12 years old, so I expect bigger commitment with chores from bigger kids.

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Just to put you in an American mindset (at least the one I grew up with), as far as this goes: My parents used to keep us out of school one day a year to go to an adventure park when it was less crowded. I stayed home from school for various things, such as waiting for a repairman or a package.

 

While my parents didn't go to the extreme of "home schooling me" so that they could do whatever they want, when they want, it certainly fits into the mentality that I grew up with.

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That's probably your light touch, thin welfare state. 

 

I don't do bureacracy much because it's a state buying you and I'm not into anyone trying that.   Of course, if states pump tons of money into encouraging certain life options, they are likely going to want a return on that - including controlling what you do.   As long as they are stumping up several hundred grand per child, you can 100% expect them to want to meddle in your life when they think they should.  You de facto sold / rented a share of your life to them.  Your home life is now part "public good".  A deal - not a free lunch. Hard to have cake and eat it.

 

Far harder for a state like the US, which seems not to bother with even parental leave much, to assert such a claim.

 

And holidays are much more a status thing now, that when a lot of us just got dumped in a tent or the nearest beach for a few days.   The low or middle income family or single parent has few other ways to keep up with the myriad Joneses surrounding them (the managers splashing cash in the Maldives, the slacker singles on seemingly permanent vacations, the dinkies on their expensive city break and lots lots more). 

 

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9 minutes ago, tokwatbaboy said:

Delivering the baby, will the costs covered by the government insurance?

If you mean public health insurance the answer is yes.

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19 minutes ago, tokwatbaboy said:

Hello! Newbie here. 

Here is the background:

I got an offer to Munich, currently me and my family lives in Austria. My wife is 5 months pregnant and will be delivering our 2nd baby by Spring 2019. We plan to move in munich around march/april 2019. My questions:

1. Delivering the baby, will the costs covered by the government insurance?

 

There is no  government insurance in Germany.

 

Quote

 

I plan to avail the family insurance.

 

"Family insurance" is only available for those who are covered by the statutory health insurance of a family member. The statutory health insurance funds cover the costs of a birth. 

 

With the forum search (top right) you will find countless threads on this topic, this one has nothing to do with it.

 

To find a midwife, you can use this tool (in German only) https://www.hebammensuche.bayern and to find doctors this one: http://www.arzt-bayern.de

 

edit:

 

19 minutes ago, tokwatbaboy said:

Deleted. Sorry incorrect topic

 

Too late. ;) 

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