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Moving into a New Built Flat

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So I soon move into a new built flat and the developer has asked whether I wish to do a formal or an informal inspection.

 

The informal inspection is that I see the flat with a surveyor and then 1 week  later I pick up the keys. The developer prefers this.

 

The formal inspection is that I also see the flat with a surveyor and if the surveyor decides there are faults then the developer has 2 weeks to fix the faults before handing over the keys.

 

The informal inspection (I can move in quicker) will happen earlier, while the formal inspection is that the faults will be fixed quicker.

 

I am thinking of going for the informal inspection as I have a 5 year warranty on the flat and I would like to move quicker.

 

Does anyone see a drawback going for the informal inspection ? 

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The only thing i can think of is that a surveyor will see things that you might not.  It might also depend on what your contract says about the handover

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Congratulations on the new flat!

 

How long would repairs take should you or the surveyor discover something during the informal inspection?

 

There are a few things you might would rather have done before all of your things are there.

 

Hopefully, everything will be just fine.

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I've never heard of such a thing as a formal or informal inspection, but I suppose that's just something the developer had devised for a purpose that escapes me.

 

I'd first ask why there's a delay between the survey and the handing over of the keys. When I bought my new flat I used a surveyor who found a long list of faults that I couldn't even see when they were pointed out to me and I stared at with reading glasses. Still, the keys were handed over to me and the developer fixed most of these things at a later point. There was no particular deadline that I can remember.

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I would always go with the formal inspection. A flat or house is the largest single investment anyone makes in their life: get it surveyed properly.

 

  I would also make sure that it was an independent surveyor and not one that the developer foists on you.

 

For the sake of a few weeks, you will have peace of mind that all is ok. If something is missed, ultimately it won't be your fault but the surveyor's.

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Thanks for everyones reply. I am sort of thinking informal but I have a few weeks to decide.

 

I do have a 5 year warranty on the flat which is good to have.

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1 hour ago, RenegadeFurther said:

I do have a 5 year warranty on the flat which is good to have.

 

Have you read what is in warranty?

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I have not heard of anyone taking a surveyor to the inspection but it may be that lots of people do but it's the sort of thing they never see worth mentioning.  Of course, appoint one if it gives you comfort.  Otherwise, it could be worth taking someone who's had experience of it before and so knows what to look for.  You can also google for lists and such of typical thnigs to look for.

 

My experience over several properties now is that you get snags of course but that anything you list will get fixed and the warranty if needed is OK.  Also worth bearing in mind that substantial issues are often building-wide (heating, structure etc) and so you will be resolving them communally, supported by a managing agent expert, and so you will not be alone.   In general, it does seem to me that the purchase price transfers the risk, and your warranty and insurance deals with the rest.  

 

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14 minutes ago, swimmer said:

I have not heard of anyone taking a surveyor to the inspection but it may be that lots of people do but it's the sort of thing they never see worth mentioning.  Of course, appoint one if it gives you comfort.  Otherwise, it could be worth taking someone who's had experience of it before and so knows what to look for.  You can also google for lists and such of typical thnigs to look for.

 

My experience over several properties now is that you get snags of course but that anything you list will get fixed and the warranty if needed is OK.  Also worth bearing in mind that substantial issues are often building-wide (heating, structure etc) and so you will be resolving them communally, supported by a managing agent expert, and so you will not be alone.   In general, it does seem to me that the purchase price transfers the risk, and your warranty and insurance deals with the rest.  

 

 

Thanks for your reply.

 

Have you ever been in a position where during the handover the surveyor finds something big which can`t prevent someone from moving in ? What would be the protocol then ?

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There are two elements usually, the inspection and the handover (sometimes they seem to happen at the same time).  It is important to keep perspective, not catastrophise, as I said on another thread.   The first thing is that, if it is clearly not ready, this is often obvious and so the developer / builder will often accept it and the timetable will be held up anyway.

 

What I presume is being called the inspection here is the Abnahme and you will get a form on which you can list all of the deficiencies.   Your contract should have legal remedies for processing them.   

 

Most builds go pretty well generally although there are invariably snags.  As I said, I never had a surveyor.  I have always accepted a handover when a place is not fully finished.  It is still liveable.  Then have the battles which, if they are necessary, will be ones other owners will be having along with you, probably.  Full legal ownership (which also means you can participate in the owner community) is valuable and that is not transferred until these procedures are signed off and so inho it is usually worth securing that and then having the discussions.   I and my family have done a few now and some things you learn - there will be snags and often the same ones and some may never be fixed, the developer may well go bust etc but we always still have a decent home.    When I tot up the additional money I had to spend on bits and pieces of repairs on things that got overlooked, it's only ever a tiny sum (I mean like a few hundred Euro on a 200k etc). 

 

You also learn lots of positives - like a good managing agent is dirt cheap at the price in the early "snag" years and well worth getting to know, if you have not already.    What caused me the most inconvenience and worries me most is the prosaic matter of getting in, as structural change often repositions doors.  As a cautious sort, I tend to always make sure I take valuables / esssentials out with me in the early days, and locate a local locksmith.

 

 

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Maybe someone can help me with some issues I have been having in flat.

 

So the flat above mine had a faulty washing machine connection. The owner of the flat above had been using the washing machine for one month. As a result of the faulty washing machine connection a lot of water has gone into the system. The flat above has the walls completely damaged but in our case we have noticed some damp spots on the ceiling of our bathroom.

 

The plumber (sanitar company) has admitted fault and he says his liability insurance will cover the repairs. How can i protect myself here in case for example mould grows, the price drops because of the mishap with the washing machine connection.

 

Do I just trust that the repairs are done correctly?

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There should be some type of warranty with the repair.

 

What do you mean by price drop? The value of your home? If so, surely not.

 

Sorry for you. What a PITA. I hope you don't encounter any more faulty work.

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Just now, fraufruit said:

There should be some type of warranty with the repair.

 

What do you mean by price drop? The value of your home? If so, surely not.

 

Sorry for you. What a PITA. I hope you don't encounter any more faulty work.

 

We have a 5 year warranty with the developer.

 

However the developer does not want to get involved and has left it to the liability insurance of the sanitor company to fix the issue. 

 

If there is mould left by water this could be a serious issue which could effectively cause the price to drop.

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I've know people who had similar problems - some just renting. They will probably put some monster fan/s in your ceiling to dry it out very well before the repair after they dig out the wet stuff. I wouldn't be too worried. You do have another bathroom, right?

 

I reckon the sanitor's insurance would pay whether or not the developer got involved. They probably made a bundle if they did the whole building and probably want to keep up their good reputation.

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That''s bad luck. We had a leak from a faulty shower fitting a few years ago and needed to run a dehumidifier constantly for a couple of weeks. Luckily our insurance covered everything. 

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Similar for me, washing machine problem in the apartment over us, while we were away on holiday. Came back to find half the ceiling in the kitchen down and water damage everywhere:o. Fortunately our Hausmeister had been coming in to water the flowers on the balcony and he was able to get the leak stopped and clear up much of the water. Our neighbors insurance paid for all the repairs, damage and 2 weeks worth of dehumidifiers+electric. Never had a sign of any mold.

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So, they are now going to fix the damage in the flat above with regards to the leakage caused by the faulty washing machine connection.. The noise levels with this work will be extremely high. Now if I had rented the flat i could have got some sort of rent reduction.

 

Does anyone know if homeowners can claim some sort of compensation from the developer?

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