Practical questions on the citizenship application (Antrag auf Einbürgerung )

126 posts in this topic

Ha ha! A level is the Advanced level certificate of secondary education from the British education system. What that is equivalent to on the TELC scale I have no idea, but would imagine B2-C1.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kiplette said:

Ha ha! A level is the Advanced level certificate of secondary education from the British education system. What that is equivalent to on the TELC scale I have no idea, but would imagine B2-C1.

 

Deswegen eben diese Fragestellung

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely. I did idly google it for a bit, but the A part comes over as part of the TELC scale, so it is not the easiest and we had to go down to the Einbürgerungsstelle ourselves this afternoon. The nicest Beamterin. Thank goodness. She was really entertaining, suggested kid#2 include a potential bank robbery as part of his Lebenslauf. A fun 50 minutes. Who would have expected that?!

 

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/210410-is-gcse-german-equivalent-to-a-b2/ sos, I found this also somewhat inconclusive thread on the subject. I do think your Uni time might do the trick, if you have some nice paperwork to match.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, kiplette said:

Absolutely. I did idly google it for a bit, but the A part comes over as part of the TELC scale, so it is not the easiest and we had to go down to the Einbürgerungsstelle ourselves this afternoon. The nicest Beamterin. Thank goodness. She was really entertaining, suggested kid#2 include a potential bank robbery as part of his Lebenslauf. A fun 50 minutes. Who would have expected that?!

 

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/210410-is-gcse-german-equivalent-to-a-b2/ sos, I found this also somewhat inconclusive thread on the subject. I do think your Uni time might do the trick, if you have some nice paperwork to match.

 

Abslutely, CYA and ideally both sides.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're applying in Frankfurt, right? Did you meet with the Einbuergerungbehoerde to get your checklist? You can email them these questions. They will respond.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just make sure the professional translation is authenticated/certified ("beglaubigt").

Remember: this is Germany.

 

PS:

I am a professional translator. I could do it for you if you wish. PM me.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/8/2018, 2:27:31, kaffeemitmilch said:

You're applying in Frankfurt, right? Did you meet with the Einbuergerungbehoerde to get your checklist? You can email them these questions. They will respond.

 

Ah, OK, I’ll do that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/8/2018, 6:45:43, onemark said:

Just make sure the professional translation is authenticated/certified ("beglaubigt").

Remember: this is Germany.

 

PS:

I am a professional translator. I could do it for you if you wish. PM me.

 

I thought it was the translatOR that’s certified / sworn in, not the translation?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The matter of translation probably varies by location, and also possibly by individual,and it probably helps if the docs are complete and our family history is fairly simple.   I delivered the translation myself and that got accepted (in Darmstadt city, which is about as laidback as it comes).  I am not a translator, but it did not take long.  I just translated the relevant details - not all the generic form blurb.

 

My top tip for the citizenship process is to deliver what you can as soon as possible, including copies (of certificates etc).   Do not wait to be asked for them at some future meeting, or for them to do your copies then.  Run with "fait accompli" as far as you can.   They did not let me get away with that every time but it worked for that one and got me off a few other hooks of unnecessary work (cost).

 

My first submission of the original application form included this translation and a copy of the certificates.   So far less for them to do at the first meeting and of course I took the originals to confirm they did exist.  (Also did the same for my language cert etc).

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ sos-the-rope (10 May):

I thought it was the translatOR that’s certified / sworn in, not the translation? A state-authorised/sworn translator has to authenticate the translation.

 

No.

Translators swear an oath to a state court judge that they will faithfully ensure that a translation is true and accurate. They are then authorised by the state in the form of the judge to do this.

Putting their stamp on a translation that they consider to be true and accurate is the actual authentication process.

 

They take this process very seriously as there are (at least potentially) penalties for authenticating an inaccurate translation: it's considered a form of forgery.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/8/2018, 2:27:31, kaffeemitmilch said:

You're applying in Frankfurt, right? Did you meet with the Einbuergerungbehoerde to get your checklist? You can email them these questions. They will respond.

 

Best advice so far! They are helpful as always. My near perfect German helps, of course. Kinda ironic being told in response that, no, I must present my B1 certificate, not just the registration for the test... good old red tape. If I needed the B1 I wouldn’t know it ;-)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/7/2018, 11:15:30, sos-the-rope said:

- why do I need to take a B1 or higher language certificate if i have eg German A-Level, proof that I actually studied at University level in German, proven work experience in Germany working for German companies, etc? Would they accept that stuff or is it a big waste of time?

 

Same with me, despite my A-level and degree in German, including time spend studying in Germany, now living and working here for over seven years, and of course sitting there speaking with the lady at the KVR in Munich in my near-perfect German, I had to go get the B2 level test - this was done last autumn. The explanation given to me was that it is so that the German side is sure about the level achieved and everyone being subjected to the same test regime, that's why she recommended to me to go B2 or higher. The advantage being that your application can then be dealt with at Länder level and not in Berlin, which avoids any time-consuming back and forth if/when extra documents are requested and will be in general completed much quicker.

 

Citizenship tests are done regularly by local VHS, and other places, I downloaded an app to practice, but didn't really need to and was out of the test in under 10 minutes ... 100% score! I don't think its anything for you to worry about if you studied German and have lived here for long enough.  The waiting for both test results was in actual fact about the same length of time as my submission then took to be granted.

 

For tha application, I did put Entfällt in every box; it wasn't any big issue and I just wanted to do things by the book as far as possible. What you have to bear in mind is that the process is all essentially about a Sachbearbeiter ticking boxes to say all requirements have been fulfilled, especially for Ermessungs (discretionary) applications, so its best to make their life as easy as possible and not mess around. Also, when they do ask for further documentation (wife's wage slips, marriage certificate - both at different times and not on the original submissions list I was asked for), send it back asap while you are still at the top of the work pile.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

 The explanation given to me was that it is so that the German side is sure about the level achieved and everyone being subjected to the same test regime,

 

 Absolutely right.   States generally tend not to want other people pointing to others not having to go through required process they are told to.   In quite a few cases, they have to, for reasons such as constitutional requirement for equality and such. 

 

As  a result of course, that advice was correct, to get the highest certification possible, even if only B1 is usually needed.   You may as well.  Go as high as you easily can.   A grade 4 at C1 is more valuable than a 1 at B2 etc.

 

The citizenship test is very easy for someone in a position to be a citizen.  Most people when I did it took about 10 minutes. (Not me).   I'd done the old version of that ages ago, but that was also not accepted, I had to do it again.

 

Quote

The advantage being that your application can then be dealt with at Länder level and not in Berlin, which avoids any time-consuming back and forth if/when extra documents are requested and will be in general completed much quicker.

 

They got that bit wrong.  Naturalisation is done by parliamentary states, it's a country matter not a political one, so not done by federal government Länder or in Berlin.   That's Darmstadt Parliament for this Frankfurt resident poster (and not our Hesse capital Wiesbaden, or Berlin).   

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, ridebreaker said:

 

Same with me, despite my A-level and degree in German, including time spend studying in Germany, now living and working here for over seven years, and of course sitting there speaking with the lady at the KVR in Munich in my near-perfect German, I had to go get the B2 level test - this was done last autumn. The explanation given to me was that it is so that the German side is sure about the level achieved and everyone being subjected to the same test regime, that's why she recommended to me to go B2 or higher. The advantage being that your application can then be dealt with at Länder level and not in Berlin, which avoids any time-consuming back and forth if/when extra documents are requested and will be in general completed much quicker.

 

Citizenship tests are done regularly by local VHS, and other places, I downloaded an app to practice, but didn't really need to and was out of the test in under 10 minutes ... 100% score! I don't think its anything for you to worry about if you studied German and have lived here for long enough.  The waiting for both test results was in actual fact about the same length of time as my submission then took to be granted.

 

For tha application, I did put Entfällt in every box; it wasn't any big issue and I just wanted to do things by the book as far as possible. What you have to bear in mind is that the process is all essentially about a Sachbearbeiter ticking boxes to say all requirements have been fulfilled, especially for Ermessungs (discretionary) applications, so its best to make their life as easy as possible and not mess around. Also, when they do ask for further documentation (wife's wage slips, marriage certificate - both at different times and not on the original submissions list I was asked for), send it back asap while you are still at the top of the work pile.

 

Thanks.

 

You're right, the citizenship test is a complete cinch. I just tried the 33-question version online again, and got 97% (for Berlin; I'm in FFM!).

 

I'm an over-preparer so I wonder how I can cram for B2. But then if it's basically "I can read and write German like a decent secondary school student" I think there's not really any point.

 

Ironically I've felt my mounds of obscure book-grammar melting away like the snow listening to people saying "weil ich kann das" and "ich bin Hauptbahnhof", and absorbing soul-crushing Bürodeutsch formalisms. Yay, immersion. But then I also learned some stuff that my German teacher friend had to go look up so...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are practice papers on the websites of the two main bodies. You can also get practice books for the two main certificates (inc. borrow them from the library).  Exam prep may be more important than "cramming" but such books do have lots of relevant vocab structures etc.

 

https://www.telc.net/fileadmin/user_upload/telc_deutsch_b2_uebungstest_1.pdf

 

There's four skills (speaking and listening on top of those two you list) and usually language element exercise (gap fill exercise or two).    You get one grade but you also must pass the writing.  There are some variants.  You could do a business one rather than general for instance, if that may be of more use, and there you have scaled options (B1-B2, B2-C1) that give you flexibility in targeting.

 

UK GCSE would take you to between A2 and B1.   A level is about B2.   Degree is C1 (as most UK universities state).   That's the usual rough proxy for the UK.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/29/2018, 10:37:55, swimmer said:

There are practice papers on the websites of the two main bodies. You can also get practice books for the two main certificates (inc. borrow them from the library).  Exam prep may be more important than "cramming" but such books do have lots of relevant vocab structures etc.

 

https://www.telc.net/fileadmin/user_upload/telc_deutsch_b2_uebungstest_1.pdf

 

There's four skills (speaking and listening on top of those two you list) and usually language element exercise (gap fill exercise or two).    You get one grade but you also must pass the writing.  There are some variants.  You could do a business one rather than general for instance, if that may be of more use, and there you have scaled options (B1-B2, B2-C1) that give you flexibility in targeting.

 

UK GCSE would take you to between A2 and B1.   A level is about B2.   Degree is C1 (as most UK universities state).   That's the usual rough proxy for the UK.

 

OMG - I just saw this - thanks!!! That's awesome!

 

TELC is the right exam body for the citizenship application, right? All the chit chat has got me questioning myself again.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, TELC or Goethe, but Telc is cheaper, and one hears that they are more of the mindset to be generous in their marking.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any of the awarding bodies will do - certainly telc but also goethe (and others I guess others like that one the Unis use for entry, DSH or whatever it's called).   I had minimum B1  from telc from the integration course but used the goethe C1 in my application.  May as well punch as hard as you can.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now