Practical questions on the citizenship application (Antrag auf Einbürgerung )

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So here goes another red tape marathon.

 

anyone got a clear answer for the following questions?

 

- What’s the difference between personal name (Eigenname) and forename(s) - “Vorname”?

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5 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

So here goes another red tape marathon.

 

anyone got a clear answer for the following questions?

 

- What’s the difference between personal name (Eigenname) and forename(s) - “Vorname”?

 

- do you really have to put “entfällt” in every single box that you don’t fill out? A line through them wouldn’t do?

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- the list of periods of residence (“Aufenthalt”): do they really want to see everywhere you’ve lived since birth? For those of us who’ve lived in many countries it’s kind of a long list...!

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39 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

the list of periods of residence (“Aufenthalt”): do they really want to see everywhere you’ve lived since birth? For those of us who’ve lived in many countries it’s kind of a long list...!

 

Yes, they do and yes, some of us have a long list and yes, just bite the bullet.

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7 hours ago, sos-the-rope said:

So here goes another red tape marathon.

 

anyone got a clear answer for the following questions?

 

- What’s the difference between personal name (Eigenname) and forename(s) - “Vorname”?

 

In some countries people don't distinguish between first names and surnames, unlike here in Europe.

 

Here's an explanation: 

https://www.rechtslupe.de/familienrecht/der-auslaendische-eigenname-und-der-deutsche-vor-und-familienname-374084

 

Quote

In Anwendung des Artikels 47 EGBGB kann es einem ausländischen Namensträger, der nach seinem Heimatrecht einen nicht zwischen Vor- und Familiennamen unterscheidenden Eigennamen führt, gestattet sein, Teile seines Eigennamens als Vornamen und andere Teile als (Geburts-) Familiennamen zu bestimmen.

 

In application of article 47 EGBGB it may be permitted for a foreign holder of a personal name, which does not distinguish between a first name and a surname under his/her right of residence in his/her country of origin to designate parts of his/her personal name as first name(s) and other parts as surname(s).

 

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1 hour ago, bramble said:

 

In some countries people don't distinguish between first names and surnames, unlike here in Europe.

 

Here's an explanation: 

https://www.rechtslupe.de/familienrecht/der-auslaendische-eigenname-und-der-deutsche-vor-und-familienname-374084

 

 

In application of article 47 EGBGB it may be permitted for a foreign holder of a personal name, which does not distinguish between a first name and a surname under his/her right of residence in his/her country of origin to designate parts of his/her personal name as first name(s) and other parts as surname(s).

 

 

I kind of guessed something like this.

 

so what do we put where?

 

like many Germans I have a first, second, and family name.

 

shove the 1st and 2nd both in “forename”?

 

or only the 1st?

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1 hour ago, sos-the-rope said:

 

I kind of guessed something like this.

 

so what do we put where?

 

like many Germans I have a first, second, and family name.

 

shove the 1st and 2nd both in “forename”?

 

or only the 1st?

 

I also have two first names and a family name. I entered both first names in the space for Vorname(n) as stated on my birth certficate.

 

9 hours ago, sos-the-rope said:

 

- do you really have to put “entfällt” in every single box that you don’t fill out? A line through them wouldn’t do?

 

Just leave these boxes blank. That's what I did. No questions asked. 

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On 5/4/2018, 7:37:01, bramble said:

 

I also have two first names and a family name. I entered both first names in the space for Vorname(n) as stated on my birth certficate.

 

 

Just leave these boxes blank. That's what I did. No questions asked. 

 

Thanks, that helps! :-)

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On 5/3/2018, 10:46:52, LeCheese said:

 

Yes, they do and yes, some of us have a long list and yes, just bite the bullet.

 

Yeah, it's not the hassle of preparing the list per se, it's actually remembering or looking up the dates! It's all been a bit of blur up til now TBH. The time in Germany is the most settled I've ever been.

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So one more question, @LeCheese, @bramble, and anyone else who might care:

 

 - do I need to procure a fresh statement from the German university where I studied on my ERASMUS year (for the proof of residence/periods of study) or would it be sufficient to dig up the certificates I got back in the day when I'd just completed that year?

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11 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

Yeah, it's not the hassle of preparing the list per se, it's actually remembering or looking up the dates!

 

Just put  ( for example ) Jan 1995 to Dec 1997- France ( or wherever ) I asked if the needed specific days start / finish and they said no, month would be fine but at a push they would accept year as well.( 1995 -.1997 )

 

4 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

do I need to procure a fresh statement from the German university where I studied on my ERASMUS year (for the proof of residence/periods of study) or would it be sufficient to dig up the certificates I got back in the day when I'd just completed that year?

 

Can`t help you on that one - hopefully someone else will know

 

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23 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

Hi @LeCheese, @bramble,

 

Do you know where to get the history of insurance payments (Rentenversicherungsverlauf)?

 

From the Deutsche Rentenversicherung Bund

 

 

25 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

Also: my work contract's in English. Will they need a translation of this?

 

No idea on that one, give them a call if you can.

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 - I guess it’s ok to take a citizenship test at any of these if they’re listed in Bamf, right:

 

https://www.bamf.de/SharedDocs/Anlagen/DE/Downloads/Infothek/Einbuergerung/Pruefstellen-HE.pdf?__blob=publicationFile

 

- why do I need to take a B1 or higher language certificate if i have eg German A-Level, proof that I actually studied at University level in German, proven work experience in Germany working for German companies, etc? Would they accept that stuff or is it a big waste of time?

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Yup. I travelled miles to get a test in a reasonable time frame, and that's fine (just so long as it is within your Land). The VHS even waived the booking-in-person rule to save me a trip, and accepted my application after the date had closed. Really very helpful people.

 

I don't think you will always need the actual B1 bit of paper. As I understand it from others who have been there already, there is some discretion allowed and if the Beamter can see that you are properly fluent they can waive it, but I would take along the proof of Uni study just in case a piece of paper in your file would make everyone feel happier.

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59 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

 - I guess it’s ok to take a citizenship test at any of these if they’re listed in Bamf, right:

 

https://www.bamf.de/SharedDocs/Anlagen/DE/Downloads/Infothek/Einbuergerung/Pruefstellen-HE.pdf?__blob=publicationFile

 

- why do I need to take a B1 or higher language certificate if i have eg German A-Level, proof that I actually studied at University level in German, proven work experience in Germany working for German companies, etc? Would they accept that stuff or is it a big waste of time?

 

 

If you have a university degree for a course conducted in German then they will accept this as proof of language skills.

 

You can take the test anywhere that is a certified test centre and it doesn't have to be your local one.

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38 minutes ago, kiplette said:

Yup. I travelled miles to get a test in a reasonable time frame, and that's fine (just so long as it is within your Land). The VHS even waived the booking-in-person rule to save me a trip, and accepted my application after the date had closed. Really very helpful people.

 

I don't think you will always need the actual B1 bit of paper. As I understand it from others who have been there already, there is some discretion allowed and if the Beamter can see that you are properly fluent they can waive it, but I would take along the proof of Uni study just in case a piece of paper in your file would make everyone feel happier.

 

Well, there's no kill like overkill, so there's that. I was thinking from a common sense point of view, it's obvious I can understand & speak German at a high level, but from a box-ticking POV I bet you'd have to do some horrific certificate revalidation / translation / whateveration so it might be quicker, cheaper and less stressful just to get the B2 like everyone else.

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1 hour ago, sos-the-rope said:

 - I guess it’s ok to take a citizenship test at any of these if they’re listed in Bamf, right:

 

https://www.bamf.de/SharedDocs/Anlagen/DE/Downloads/Infothek/Einbuergerung/Pruefstellen-HE.pdf?__blob=publicationFile

 

- why do I need to take a B1 or higher language certificate if i have eg German A-Level, proof that I actually studied at University level in German, proven work experience in Germany working for German companies, etc? Would they accept that stuff or is it a big waste of time?

I doubt that you can study at a German university in German with only A-level.

Did you mean kindergarten?

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2 minutes ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

I doubt that you can study at a German university in German with only A-level.

Did you mean kindergarten?

He/She PROBABLY meant C level in their case.

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4 minutes ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

I doubt that you can study at a German university in German with only A-level.

Did you mean kindergarten?

 

I think that they meant that they had taken the British School "A-Level" grade exams (which is roughly equivalent to the CEFR B1/B2 level), then took a university degree in German and continued to work and live in Germany but never took any other CEFR rated German exams and hence have no certificates to prove their level.

 

 

26 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

 

Well, there's no kill like overkill, so there's that. I was thinking from a common sense point of view, it's obvious I can understand & speak German at a high level, but from a box-ticking POV I bet you'd have to do some horrific certificate revalidation / translation / whateveration so it might be quicker, cheaper and less stressful just to get the B2 like everyone else.

 

This depends on time, and cost.  You will have to register for the exam a few weeks in advance, then in my case I had to wait 7 weeks for the result.  So this can easily take 2 -3 months.  The B2 exam will also cost ~190 Euros. 

 

It might be quicker and cheaper to go along to the Rathaus with your degree certificate and ask somebody if they would accept it or not.

 

 

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