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'Letter of Entitlement' for converting German licence

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GAH! Burocracy again!

 I need to exchange my German licence for an Irish one -- for insurance purposes, 700€ cheaper!
After an age, the lady  atthe irish licence office was finally finished with all the forms etc, checking everything double and triple -- and then she scrapped it all, because the weights of the vehicles I am entitled to drive are not given on my licence!!!!
She says I need a "letter of entitlement" from Germany stating what the weights would be: this is for FS Klasse B, C1, BE, C1E, M and L, as given on the back of my licence. I told her I didn't even want to drive those vehicles (except for the car) but she said  no, I need that Letter of Entitlement, translated into English if you please! 
Has anyone heard of this LofE? I'm going to call the Führerscheinstelle tomorrow and ask for it but I expect they will have no idea what it's about. The weights of the vehicles involved are quite simply integrated into the Führerscheinklasse, as explained here: https://www.fahrschule.de/Verkehrsrecht/Fuehrerschein/Fuehrerschein_Fahrerlaubnisklassen.html

But I suspect they won't accept that, not even in translation, unless it's actually in this Letter of Entitlement.
Have you heard of this problem before? Is there officially such a letter? I googled but couldn't find it, not on TT, not anywhere. What should I ask for when I call tomorrw, ie is there an official translation for Letter of Entitlement?

 

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This time you must show the lady some teeth and tell her to go **** herself.

 

You have a European design driving license (not a paper one, right?), and the weight for category B is < 3.5 tonnes. I don't know the weights of the other categories you have, but they are absolutely the same across Europe (that's why Germany adopted these categories in the first place).

 

It's her task to know these weights, not yours.

 

If that doesn't help, ask for written denial and go to a lawyer. You can threaten her to go all the way up to European Court of Justice :)

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That's exactly what I would have thought but sitting in that office, I could not know for sure what the rule is.

Maybe find something in English that explains this...

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1 hour ago, arunadasi said:

...

 I need to exchange my German licence for an Irish one -- for insurance purposes, 700€ cheaper!
...

 

 

Isn't this discrimination?  I thought that under EU law you had to treat other EU citizens (in this case a German License holder) the same as local citizens.

 

I quickly found this:

https://eur-lex.europa.eu/summary/glossary/nondiscrimination_principle.html

 

(Although this seems a principle and might not apply totally in all laws)

 

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OK so yesterday I went back to the office armed with a wad of print-out, the EU regulations with pix of all the veihicles, weights etc, ready to do battle with that woman. I had not made any calls as she had instructed.

 

And guess what, she wasn't there! It was a man, the guy who had dealt with me the first time I went there. The only argument I had with him is with my name; he refused to transcribe the ü as ue, so I end up with a u, which gives me a rather silly surname when mispronounced by English speakers! But in the end I accepted it with a sigh.

 

Anyway: yesterday there he was again and he never asked about weights or letters of entitlement etc. He knew his job. He did it quickly and efficiently, took my photo, got me to sign, told me my German licence is being sent to Germany and my Irish one will be here in a few weeks, gave me a paper with my number to show if anyone asks for licence, and voila! Done! :)

 

I must say the Irish way of changing vehicles is so very simple and quick. My problems were due to my German background. Normally here all you do is fill in a registration form the old owner shows you with your name and address, and they pop it in the post. You pay the money and get the car and keys, no paperwork changes hands. A few days later you get a document with your registration number and car details and a link to pay car tax. You make a call to get insurance, pay the tax online, and that's it. No going to any amt or changing of licence plates etc.

 

Anyway thanks especially to @yourkeau for the tip which seems pretty obvious in retrospect and I should have known and not been intimidated by that stupid woman, and insisted that she just do her job.

Timewaster!

 

 

 

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On 19/04/2018, 10:33:39, arunadasi said:

The only argument I had with him is with my name; he refused to transcribe the ü as ue, so I end up with a u, which gives me a rather silly surname when mispronounced by English speakers! But in the end I accepted it with a sigh.

 

 

It makes absolutely no sense to pop in an extra letter which wasn't there in the first place. Letters which are not present in other alphabets should be transcribed in the closest way possible, so ü -> u, å, ä -> a, ö -> o. 

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If you had shown your German passport, they would have seen in the machine readable section that your name was entered with the "ü" substituted by the "ue".  That might have persuaded them.  Also might not have.

 

 

 

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20 minutes ago, marbe166 said:

 

It makes absolutely no sense to pop in an extra letter which wasn't there in the first place. Letters which are not present in other alphabets should be transcribed in the closest way possible, so ü -> u, å, ä -> a, ö -> o. 

 

Says who?  ESTA do it, so do British documents.  They both follow ICAO rules.

 

"The ESTA website is capable, however, of dealing with the vast majority of French, German and Swedish accented characters by automatically transliterating them into the Latin letter equivalent. A German name like “Müller”, for example, would be automatically transliterated into “Mueller”.

 

British passports follow ICAO rules on transliteration too, which for (German) are ü/ue  ä/ae  ö/oe and ß/ss.

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

 

Says who?  ESTA do it, so do British documents.  They both follow ICAO rules.

 

"The ESTA website is capable, however, of dealing with the vast majority of French, German and Swedish accented characters by automatically transliterating them into the Latin letter equivalent. A German name like “Müller”, for example, would be automatically transliterated into “Mueller”.

 

British passports follow ICAO rules on transliteration too, which for (German) are ü/ue  ä/ae  ö/oe and ß/ss.

 

 

I know the ICAO rules, what I'm saying is that they don't make sense.

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They do make sense as far as pronunciation is concerned. Adding an e ensures that non-Germans at least make a small effort to pronounce it correctly, even if they don't know it. Without the e my name sounds so silly in english  Germany accepted it as a reason for my son to change his name when living in an English-speaking country; they said this in the Bescheid. And I might do the same ie change my name in a couple of years.

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7 hours ago, snowingagain said:

If you had shown your German passport, they would have seen in the machine readable section that your name was entered with the "ü" substituted by the "ue".  That might have persuaded them.  Also might not have.

 

 

 

 

I did show my German passport and the transliteration at the bottom. They still wouldn't accept it.

 

I had a huge problem with this when trying to get an Indian visa in Sri Lanka. One visa office insisted u was correct, the other that ue was correct. Both insisted that the application would be rejected, and the €100 fee lost, if I did not do as they said.

 

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13 minutes ago, arunadasi said:

What's a fada???

 

A fada in Irish is the accent on a vowel

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As an unlucky citizen of the country with non Latin alphabet I feel your pain, arunadasi.

 

4 hours ago, marbe166 said:

I know the ICAO rules, what I'm saying is that they don't make sense.

Name is the property of the person, not the government. Or used to be. In good old times Germans who arrived into USA decided for themselves how to spell their names.

 

Now the government decides.

 

Since Ireland is in the EU, hosts the headquarters of Google and Facebook Europe, why is the transliteration necessary? Do Irish authorities still use MS DOS or something? Why not print ü as ü?

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23 minutes ago, yourkeau said:

Since Ireland is in the EU, hosts the headquarters of Google and Facebook Europe, why is the transliteration necessary? Do Irish authorities still use MS DOS or something? Why not print ü as ü?

 

If you are Greek, you will have problems even in these days of having your name in EU documents in Greek.  

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