Any Munich Toytown day trading or investment groups?

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I'm on board Toytown attempting to find a room near my children in or somewhat near Harlaching.   When talking with friends here in Munich, I lived here for two years from 2011-2013, they ask me how I will find employment.  I've investigated the "Moving to Munich and my Situation is  Unique" page and after reading through the threads I was feeling suicidal.  No, I wasn't a top engineer in Poland, France, Great Britain, etc....looking to make Munich my home.  Good thing, because the replies basically state that I've a better chance at getting Donald Trump to Join the "National Audubon Society" than ever obtaining employment in Munich, even as a successful foreign engineer.  So what's the average non Nobel Prize winning American do about employment here in Munich?  Well, since the answers are basically grim, I thought about bumping up any investment income I currently have by by joining an investment or day trading group here in Munich.  Do any exist within the Munich Toytown community? 

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7 hours ago, msc5825 said:

  No, I wasn't a top engineer in Poland, France, Great Britain, etc...looking to make Munich my home.  Good thing, because the replies basically state that I've a better chance at getting Donald Trump to Join the "National Audubon Society" than ever obtaining employment in Munich, even as a successful foreign engineer.  So what's the average non Nobel Prize winning American do about employment here in Munich?

 

What are you talking about?

There are tons of jobs in Munich, even for foreigners.

Accommodation is the bigger problem.

What's your line of work?

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I would say that whatever else you do, do not go playing around with money that you cannot afford to lose!

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Catjones:  Ever hear the phrase, "don't try and catch a falling knife?"

 

fraufruit:  https://www.barrons.com/articles/the-dows-275-drop-is-scarybut-not-scary-enough-1520446025

 

Metall:  Was a real estate agent in Manhattan for the past 30 years.  Hated it.  Long story.  It's a "who you know" versus "what you know" business and I wasn't that plugged in.  Fortunately there are still people out there who don't need a hard sell to make a decision.  A deal takes longer but I can sleep at night without guilt.  Before that I was a fixed income salesperson at Lehman Brothers.  1980's.  Great biz.  You showed your customers the numbers and if they liked you they did the deal with you .  Didn't end well, no fault of my own.

 

Robinson100:   I certainly agree with that.  Thanks for the good advice.  I've been trading stocks since I'm fourteen, (my father encouraged me to learn about financial investments and loaned me some money to learn.  Unfortunately he wasn't a Trump so it was a small amount).  I have a small amount of money that is "at risk" money that I could try and achieve above average returns over what I have in my pension.  I don't want to lose it and I'm a big talker about the amount of risk I'm willing to take but I sure can dream big.  

 

 

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I've been expecting a BIG correction and a bear market to come along for a couple of years now. Way past due. I'm prepared to ride it out for a few years. Just hate to see this stupid trade war be the catalyst. So unnecessary. 

 

There is a little thread about fiddling around with stocks if you're interested. Ignore the trolls.

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Glad to see there are those who follow the equity markets here.  I'm guessing there aren't any groups though since no one has referenced one.  

 

All I'll say regarding a big correction is that you can't solve a debt crisis, (2008) with more debt.  So the worst is yet to come IMO.  But of course, "timing is EVERYTHING."  This is not just about Trump, although he is a big part of the problem.

 

 

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fraufruit, I enjoyed your "fiddling: thread.  There are some aspiring investors out there in Toytown.  Lots of volatility in the equity markets these days.  Great for "good" traders.  Right now good traders are the ones short.  I will say that if you're an AMZN, INTC or MLP holder you;ve been blindsided by news events.  Which validates the holding a diverse portfolio theme.  

 

BTW I haven't been a big GE fan.  It's had a lot of problems.  Dennis O Leary had a good read on it and stated he wouldn't be  a buyer until $13.  I'm a big sentiment guy and GE was wallowing in poor sentiment.  Not sure if that's enough to get a bull run though.  Warren Buffet likes to buy when companies are bleeding badly.  If he's not a buyer I would beware.  He loves those iconic American brand names,

 

If I find a room to rent and move here maybe we start an investment club.  It's always fun to chat about ideas.

 

Good luck out there.

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4 hours ago, msc5825 said:

Catjones:  Ever hear the phrase, "don't try and catch a falling knife?"

Not so much...buy low, sell high is more to my liking.

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There are many jobs available here, but you need to know the language.  How's your German? Not sure if the real estate market is a good one since I think it also depends on who you know here and the market is very different than in the states.  I would think that a position in banking/investment would be you best bet.  Munich is the second best location for that outside of Frankfurt.  Here are a bunch of jobs that might interest you:  http://www.jobsinmunich.com/search?q=investment 

 

 

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Coolness:  I detect a note of sarcasm.  Well.  Long story but became close friends with woman who worked near me, (not romantic) at Lehman who unbeknownst to all, (were not allowed to date within the firm) was married to my boss.  He fired me the day before my vacation two weeks after I received a work commendation from one of the managing directors.  Told me the reason was, "he didn't like me."  Perhaps to you that means "with cause."  I didn't think so nor did my dumbfounded coworkers.

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Catjones:  Me too, but it's better to wait for the selling to end before you try to pick a bottom.  In 2008 stocks started to go down.  Everyone said to buy when down 20% or so.  Short rally then down 50% or so.  Can't and don't want to remember the exact drop.

 

Brad:  Thanks for the encouragement.  Unfortunately I do not have an affinity for language.  Ich spreche kein Deutsch.  I will give it a try but am not hopeful given my miserable history.

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26 minutes ago, msc5825 said:

Coolness:  I detect a note of sarcasm.  Well.  Long story but became close friends with woman who worked near me, (not romantic) at Lehman who unbeknownst to all, (were not allowed to date within the firm) was married to my boss.  He fired me the day before my vacation two weeks after I received a work commendation from one of the managing directors.  Told me the reason was, "he didn't like me."  Perhaps to you that means "with cause."  I didn't think so nor did my dumbfounded coworkers.

I believe that is a huge difference when working here.  Many executives in the US have the power to fire you at any time for any reason and therefore the power goes to their head.  On the other hand, the worker bees learn to fear the executives and get really nervous when they come around and try to hide any problems from them and are afraid to contradict them or make suggestions for improvements.  Here, you cannot fire someone because you do not like them.  Makes for a much more relaxed but yet more productive work environment.

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Whoever coined the phrase, "life is not fair," was probably just like one of us.

 

Brad:  Although still lacking integrity, US business has evolved somewhat.  Now, I don't believe you could get away with that statement without incurring some liability. 

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1 hour ago, msc5825 said:

Whoever coined the phrase, "life is not fair," was probably just like one of us.

 

Brad:  Although still lacking integrity, US business has evolved somewhat.  Now, I don't believe you could get away with that statement without incurring some liability. 

I worked for an American company "at will".  One day they ticked me off enough that I walked out (not the first employee to do so either).  They were really mad and lectured me on loyalty even after I reminded them that "at will" also meant "at my will" and that they would not have given me notice had it been the other way around. 

 

Here I have a job contract that outlines my rights plus I am backed by a union - not to mention the general laws involving employee rights.  Unless I really screw up I will be fine.  For the first time in my life I have job security at a great company.

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7 hours ago, msc5825 said:

you try to pick a bottom.

 

It's not necessary to buy at the bottom, just buy lower than your previous buy.  Whatever rationale you used when you bought at 100 is superseded when the price drops below 100.

If you buy at 90 and it drops to 80, use the same logic...hence: buy low.

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Brad:  German employees have power while American employees have none.  Corporate boards have been stacked with friends of those officers in charge.  CEO's make a ridiculous multiple of those working for them.  They are the ones who have raped the lower and middle class.  It's a travesty.  As for working for a German firm.  I congratulate you for your good fortune   If I can learn to speak German and find a room to reside maybe I'll get lucky too.  however that may be an impossible task.

 

Catjones:  Dollar cost averaging is brilliant in an ascending market.  I'm a skeptic on the valuation of the market currently but if it's working then go for it.

 

Here is an article that was written by a very smart guy.  Can't say he's been right about the direction of the market over the years but he does point out the pitfalls that the market may be considering.

 

https://realmoney.thestreet.com/articles/04/03/2018/why-market-collapsed-monday-and-whats-next?_ga=2.229794645.810326957.1522834236-571410368.1522834234

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