Exchanging an English driving licence for a German one

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Does anyone know if it’s possible to de-register and move back to your home country for a couple of months (if you have permanent residency) and then return, re-register and convert your license then? Or would this not work, either?

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16 minutes ago, Fritsen said:

Does anyone know if it’s possible to de-register and move back to your home country for a couple of months (if you have permanent residency) and then return, re-register and convert your license then? Or would this not work, either?

 

Are you seriously willing to give up your NE in order to exchange your license? :blink:

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On 11/17/2020, 10:20:58, Dembo said:

It took a few attempts but I got through to someone on the phone to get an appointment here in Suttgart - and it's 3rd February - i.e. well after all the current arrangements end. She knew from the records I was English and told me what I needed to bring which didn't include any mention of taking a driving test or any such nonsense. So we'll see.

 

 

 

 

 

 

How did your appointment go?

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22 hours ago, Dembo said:

I declined the C and D ones as they would have run out when I'm 50 anyway which shockingly is later this year

Fair enough if you don't need them, but for info, they are renewable.

You just have to take a type of health/eyesight test every 5 years.

 

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4 hours ago, engelchen said:

 

Are you seriously willing to give up your NE in order to exchange your license? :blink:

 

I thought you could live outside of Germany for up to a year if you had the EC permanent residency (or longer if in an EU country)?

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8 hours ago, McDee said:

How did your appointment go?

Fine, thanks for asking. I had to wait with a crowd of people outside in the rain (most were clutching numberplates for the KFZ-Zulassung) and then every 15-mins someone came out and read out the names of people that could go in and which counter to go to. As I'd made the appointment on the phone in German I was quite releaved that I'd got both the date and the time right. 
 

The guy took the best part of 10 minutes entering data and had to ask his colleague at one point what he was meant to do; I guess they haven't had many Brexit refugees yet. Then he gave me a payment card and explained to take it to the machine and pay the €47.50 (I thought it was going to be €30) and bring the reciept back. He then gave me a piece of paper to serve as a temporary licence until I get the real one - a bit irrelevant as a I don't have a car (not sure if I could hire a car if I needed to with this slip). It should take 10-14 days.

 

Pretty painless. He did try to speak English to me at one point though I understood him better in German and we proceeded only in German.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Fritsen said:

Does anyone know if it’s possible to de-register and move back to your home country for a couple of months (if you have permanent residency) and then return, re-register and convert your license then? Or would this not work, either?

 

6 hours ago, Fritsen said:

 

I thought you could live outside of Germany for up to a year if you had the EC permanent residency (or longer if in an EU country)?

 

You can't have your cake and eat it too. I think you already know that or you wouldn't have asked the question here. I would recommend reading some of the case law regarding Führerscheintourismus.

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2 hours ago, engelchen said:

You can't have your cake and eat it too. I think you already know that or you wouldn't have asked the question here. I would recommend reading some of the case law regarding Führerscheintourismus.

 

I know a couple of guys who tried to go through a Führerscheintourismus company in order to get Czech licenses and got caught.  It would have been legal if they had actually moved to the Czech Republic and lived there for 6 months before getting a license.  Similar, if somebody had the type of visa that they can legally leave Germany for more than 6 months without losing it, they could move to another country for 6 months, get a license there and then come back to Germany with that license.

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11 minutes ago, LeonG said:

It would have been legal if they had actually moved to the Czech Republic and lived there for 6 months before getting a license. 

 

You've identified the aspect, he would actually need to move (not just a long vacation).

 

11 minutes ago, LeonG said:

Similar, if somebody had the type of visa that they can legally leave Germany for more than 6 months without losing it, they could move to another country for 6 months, get a license there and then come back to Germany with that license.

 

Theoretically. Many people who try it don't manage to prove that they actually moved.

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

You've identified the aspect, he would actually need to move (not just a long vacation).

Theoretically. Many people who try it don't manage to prove that they actually moved.

In 2003 my friend’s 17 year old son from Berlin lived with us for 10 months as a HS exchange student and obtained a US license.  He returned to Berlin and simply swapped it for a German license.  We were rather amazed. 🤷‍♀️  But apparently it’s a common game for some, unless they’ve ended it.  

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51 minutes ago, engelchen said:

 

You've identified the aspect, he would actually need to move (not just a long vacation).

 

Theoretically. Many people who try it don't manage to prove that they actually moved.

 

I read about a couple of cases where German authorities confiscated such licenses based on that the person couldn't prove that they had lived in said country. 

 

The two guys I know were actually refused their licenses from the Czech authorities because they had become aware of the touristy outfit they were using.  They gave them an opportunity to prove their residency with a rental agreement, job contract, pay slips, phone and bank records which they couldn't provide.  Next thing they knew, German authorities were after the company too due to tax evasion.  

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I largely work remotely at the moment, so it's not difficult to move for 4 months or so (EU Permanent residency allows the holder up to 12 months outside of the EU vs 6 months for the standard German NE), so deregistering and living in the US for 4-5 months isn't all that difficult. I only asked because a former colleague of mine did it three years ago, but she had dual citizenship. 

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23 minutes ago, Fritsen said:

I largely work remotely at the moment, so it's not difficult to move for 4 months or so

 

While continuing to be employd in Germany? Or bring self-employed in Germany? 

 

23 minutes ago, Fritsen said:

I only asked because a former colleague of mine did it three years ago, but she had dual citizenship. 

 

It is quite possible that she committed fraud.

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2 minutes ago, engelchen said:

 

While continuing to be employd in Germany? Or bring self-employed in Germany? 

 

No. And I would be required to pay taxes in the US while living/working there, which is proof residence was established.

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Well that was fast. 3 days later and I have my Führershein.

 

Somehow I've kept C1 and C1E but only until 08.02.23. I was a bit confused by this; that's neither my birthday nor the original start date of those categories. However I've realised that's 5 years after my last UK licence was issued (i.e. for a change of address). I thought it would expire on my 50th birthday, but after some more googling the rules are that anyone with a licence issued before 2013 loses these categories at 50, and everyone since after 5 years. It seems I've slipped through the net because of the fact that the UK issues new licences for change of address and Germany doesn't and I can terrorise the neighbouhood as a 51 year old driving a 7.5 tonne truck without having done the medial or eye test.

 

I did lose D1 and D1E.

 

 

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BethAnnBitt it depends on the US state you live in, I was able to get a german license with my AL one, but not all states have an agreement with Germany and if you have a license from one of those you need to start over in Germany

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32 minutes ago, tempelton said:

BethAnnBitt it depends on the US state you live in, I was able to get a german license with my AL one, but not all states have an agreement with Germany and if you have a license from one of those you need to start over in Germany

Yes.  Our state had/has reciprocity with DE, so no surprise at that part.  What surprised us is that he only lived with us for 10 months, as a HS exchange student, and was allowed to switch to a German license back in Berlin.  His father said „It‘ll be way cheaper and much easier.“  It doesn’t seem much different than the DL tourism people have been referring to here. 🤷‍♀️ BTW, I‘ve no opinion on the ethics of it.

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On 04/02/2021, 23:36:18, BethAnnBitt said:

In 2003 my friend’s 17 year old son from Berlin lived with us for 10 months as a HS exchange student and obtained a US license.  He returned to Berlin and simply swapped it for a German license.  We were rather amazed. 🤷‍♀️  But apparently it’s a common game for some, unless they’ve ended it.  

 

So there is a 6 month rule, and your primary residence must be in that country.  But they make exception for students on the residence requirement.  

 

 

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6 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

So there is a 6 month rule, and your primary residence must be in that country.  But they make exception for students on the residence requirement.  

No idea, and this was 17 years ago.  So what flies now/where I‘m not sure.  This was Berlin. 🤷‍♀️ But clearly he was only in the US for a short term exchange, not to permanently reside.  Surprised us.  He’s 35 in Berlin now using that license. 😂

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