Physiotherapy Salaries in Southern Germany

10 posts in this topic

Hey Toytowners,

 

I'm a Swedish physiotherapist in my mid-twenties. I have a BA in Physiotherapy from a Swedish university. 3 years work experience since graduation, in Swedish primary care. A bunch of concept courses (McKenzie A & B, Orthopedic Medicine 1 & 2, vertigo course) plus recently started expanding my knowledge with graduate courses (advanced strength training, student mentor training).

 

My girlfriend is German, living and working there at the moment. I'm currently researching how life in Germany would be for me. A big part of that is the PT salary, which is lower in Germany (in general) compared to Sweden. This is, from what I understand, mainly due to differences in how PTs are educated (university degree in Sweden vs. Gesellschaft in Germany?).

 

Clinical practice also differs; in Sweden PTs are, in many cases, the first caregiver a patient meets, so we need good diagnostic competence. We also have a large emphasis on evidence-based practice, compared to Germany (Heilpraktiker and Osteopathy comes to mind).

 

My German is at the moment basic, so disregard that; would learn before moving. I know that C2 level is required to work in health care.

 

With my background, what would be a realistic salary for me in South Germany? Mainly in the areas of Baden-Wurtemberg and Bavaria. It's hard to find relevant information on Google; Sweden has a website dedicated to current wages in almost any job... Germany doesn't seem to have that, especially with scales adjustable for work experience.

 

Would be extremely grateful for this community's insights! :)

 

Vielen Dank und Guten Abend,

 

Piriformis

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9 hours ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Here you go: https://www.stepstone.de/jobs/gehalt--Physiotherapie.html

 

Medium salary with 3 years experience in Baden-Württenberg is €35K and in Bavaria €31K. Munich much higher.

The numbers given there seem to be a bit high based on what my nephew told me. He is a physiotherapist and told me salaries for junior physios in hospitals were about € 2200/month - less for those employed in private practice (that was maybe 2 or 3 years ago). He doesn´t have a university education though, so you could probably expect a bit more.

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I have been to a physiotherapist a few times, but my knowledge is limited as a patient.

 

My thoughts on this subject are more towards your degree and recognition here.  You should look into that as well.  It would be a bad time to come here, have your CV in order

and learn that while you do have a degree from Sweden, it isn't recognised until you take a few more undergrad courses in DE.

 

https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/education/university/recognition/index_en.htm

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11 hours ago, Piriformis said:

My German is at the moment basic, so disregard that; would learn before moving. I know that C2 level is required to work in health care.

 

According to www.gehalt.de the salaries range between 24k and 32k per year (depending on the Bundesland)

 

I don't know the living costs in Sweden but you need to take that into account as well. For example in Ireland the people earn more than in Germany but the living costs are much higher (bonus health insurance you pay yourself - not everything is covered in the "basic" one, kindergart is much more expensive than here, public transportation, etc. etc.) - info from my brother who lives there, he might be exaggerating but I don't see why would he.

 

 

I think the reqirement to work in a publicly owned health care institution would be B1, rather than C2 (read that in an article about Eastern European doctors and nurses moving out at an alarming rate). C Level is pretty high up there and seems somewhat like an unrealistic requirement since C level would be just honing your grammar. You are expected to communicate without issues at a B level with somewhat broken grammar (personal opinion).

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Really grateful for the replies so far. I had not found the resources you guys are linking to.

 

Seems to be a fair bit of bureaucracy in this, but that's to be expected. So from what I understand, my diploma is recognized automatically since I was educated in the EU?

 

Thanks!

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2 hours ago, Piriformis said:

So from what I understand, my diploma is recognized automatically since I was educated in the EU?

That may be so but it doesn´t automatically mean you´re allowed to work. E. g. while a physician might have an education which is accepted this doesn´t automatically mean he´s allowed to work as a physician (not even if he is German and has a German degree). There are other factors involved like e. g. physical fitness (after all, you can´t become a surgoean if you´re paralysed), criminal record etc. Not sure about the requirements for physiotherapists though.

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I am a licensed American Physical Therapist and I have a license to work here in Saxony.  The process was long a difficicult, between getting all my transcripts from college translated, 6-9months of language school to pass a b2 (ausreichend), being told I didn’t have enough massage hours in my curriculum and I need a German PT to verify I can massage PT’s after 3 months.  After all of this and quit a bit of Euro, I started working for 10 Euro/hour.  Here in Germany the pay varies from state to state and cities but not drastically.  Everything is dictated by the Krankenkasse or Health insurance companies as well.  As a PT in Germany, one has to do Weiterbildungs or Continuing Education.  This limits a foreign trained therapist because as a new PT, you can only massage and do Krankengymnastik/therapeutic exercise.  A Weiterbildung for manual therapy is 2 years long and cost around 2000 euro.  After this one is able to mobilize joints but may not manipulate because only Dr.’s and osteopaths are allowed. 

 

I wish I could say I am the only frustrated PT in the system but there are many German Pt’s who are also frustrated.

 

Hope this helps.

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In theory there is a recognition system for other EU physio qualifications, but as Irishryan said there may be limits and peculiarities in the German system that you need to account for. Registration via the Karlsruhe office currently takes 4-6months according to a clinic manager I was talking to. I think it’s B2 German that’s required. 

€2200-2500 per month is reasonable. 

The good news is that there is a shortage of physios and work is easy to find. I’m not saying that every job is great though, finding a good clinic may be a bit more difficult, but it’s easy to find something. The funding level from the Krankenkasse means that there is a pressure to treat a lot of people in order for a clinic to be profitable. 

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