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Arbeitslosgeld 1 (ALG 1) and German Citizenship

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I have been studying and later working in Baden-Würrtemberg before moving to Thuringen. When I was the Ausländeramt to apply for a new work permit, the lady claimed I was eligible for Niederlassung and gently pushed me to apply for it. And last week when I was there at the office to collect my card, she suggested that perhaps I should think about applying for German Citizenship.

I had lived off Arbeitslosgeld (ALG 1) for 3 months, searching the information turned up conflicting information. Some websites claimed i should have claimed any benefits and mention I should not have claimed ALG II / Hartz 4.  I have a couple of questions now

 

1) In case I apply for Citizenship, would this affect my chances

2) Is it worth applying for a citizenship? My line of work means my work-related travel is limited to inside Germany and the Benelux region, and I don't really see myself working outside Germany. Apart from the right to vote, does citizenship offer any advantage over Niederlassung?

 

Thanks in Advance.

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If you currently aren't receiving financial assistance from the government and earn enough money that you can get by OK, you can apply for citizenship and this will have no impact on your application.

 

I myself have applied for citizenship because I am interested in a military career. Everyone has their own reasons for applying, so it's difficult to say whether it's "worth" it or not. With citizenship, citizens formerly from non-EU member countries are allowed Hartz IV in difficult times. You are also allowed to apply to have your family brought to Germany, as long as you can prove you can take care of them financially. It also becomes easier to fill out applications in different sectors of the bureaucracy. For us non-EU citizens, we wouldn't have to go to the AB anymore for renewals, paperwork, etc.

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7 hours ago, sanjay050284 said:

2) Is it worth applying for a citizenship? My line of work means my work-related travel is limited to inside Germany and the Benelux region, and I don't really see myself working outside Germany. Apart from the right to vote, does citizenship offer any advantage over Niederlassung?

 

 

Beside EU freedom of movement I can't think of any other advantages.

 

Keep in mind, that even if you don't see yourself working outside of Germany now, this might change in the future. Also, freedom of movement is not just about working, it also gives you the right to retire anywhere in the EU, EAA and Switzerland. You can't do that with a Niederlassung. That limits you to Germany.

 

7 hours ago, sanjay050284 said:

... claimed any benefits and mention I should not have claimed ALG II / Hartz 4.

 

This seems to imply that you received ALG II, did you?

 

Receiving ALG I is not a problem, like someonesdaughter says, but ALG II is another bucket of fish.

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17 minutes ago, Smaug said:

 

This seems to imply that you received ALG II, did you?

 

 

 

 I was on ALG 1 for 3 months, then gave it up and worked part-time in Subway for 2 months and found another Job related to my study

 

Ahhh I did not know that, I assumed i could retire anywhere in the EU with a Niederlassung. Now i have a reason to apply :)

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I am also a bit pleasantly surprised that the lady at the Ausländeramt is pushing me and telling me what i could do without asking

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1 minute ago, sanjay050284 said:

 I was on ALG 1 for 3 months, then gave it up and worked part-time in Subway for 2 months and found another Job related to my study

 

That's not a problem. Don't worry.

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You would of course lose Indian citizenship. If you'd be happy with Indian permanent residence (OCI), then I recommend you apply for German citizenship. Unless you plan on getting involved in Indian politics, or want your kids to study there, or even want to buy farmland, you don't need Indian citizenship, and becoming German would be quite liberating, practically speaking.

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If you would like to stay here for good, you should go for citizenship, if only because that means that whatever happens, they can't kick you out.  It's also easier to travel with a German passport.

 

As for being on ALG i and applying for citizenship, that shouldn't be a problem.  However, if end up on ALG ii, you would need to stop taking it before you apply and stay off it until they complete the processing of your application.

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5 hours ago, lotsofballoons said:

With citizenship, citizens formerly from non-EU member countries are allowed Hartz IV in difficult times

This is available to permanent residents as well.

5 hours ago, lotsofballoons said:

You are also allowed to apply to have your family brought to Germany, as long as you can prove you can take care of them financially

Also available to residents and citizens without any difference.

5 hours ago, lotsofballoons said:

It also becomes easier to fill out applications in different sectors of the bureaucracy

Not sure which bureaucratic procedures would be more complicated for a permanent resident as opposed to a citizen. (Not saying there aren't any, I just can't think of any off the top of my head.)

5 hours ago, lotsofballoons said:

For us non-EU citizens, we wouldn't have to go to the AB anymore for renewals, paperwork, etc

No renewals are needed once you obtain the PR status. 

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The advantages of citizenship:

  • Being able to vote
    • On all levels from local to federal. As a non-German and non-EU citizen, you can't vote at all, even if you are a permanent resident and been living here a long time.  EU-citizens can vote in local elections if they are German residents, but non-EU citizens can't do even that.
  • EU freedom of movement
    • You can legally live and work in any EU country, with (almost) no conditions attached.
  • Travel visa-free to many countries (especially compared to e.g. Indian passport)
    • German passport offers visa-free travel access to most countries in the world, compared to all other passports.
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Other advantages:

 

You can be verbeamtet

 

You can apply for certain positions that are closed to non-EU citizens

 

You can work at EU institutions

 

Since you are an Indian citizen, you would benefit from being able to travel to many more countries without needing a visa. More importantly, with the OCI you don't loose all rights in your home country.

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Also, German citizenship is like insurance for life. In India or US if you become unemployed and ill you may die under a bridge. With German citizenship you can always go to Germany and get free housing, food and health care.

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I recommend that you check with a lawyer specifically about any agricultural land you might inherit before you go through with naturalization in order to be sure that there are no technicalities that could trip you up, but the general guidelines indicate that that you will be fine.

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By the way, I am currently on ALG I and waiting for a decision on my naturalization application. I was employed, but was terminated suddenly in December. I had an indefinite contract, so we will see very soon how they choose to deal with such situations.

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3 hours ago, kaffeemitmilch said:

By the way, I am currently on ALG I and waiting for a decision on my naturalization application. I was employed, but was terminated suddenly in December. I had an indefinite contract, so we will see very soon how they choose to deal with such situations.

What do you mean by waiting for a decision? Is it not like, once you fulfill the requirements/criteria, you apply and you are granted?

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