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Any advice on German police careers?

36 posts in this topic

5 hours ago, emkay said:

My daughter's boyfriend is searching for career ideas and hasn't had much inspiration from school careers advisors. His latest idea is to join the police force and he has an interview soon.  

 

Can anyone offer any real insight into police careers from your own experience or from someone you know?

 

Any advice would be very much appreciated. 

 

I was one in California. What questions do you have?

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1 hour ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

Fachabi would give him lots of options, he could go to any FH and do a variety of studies. It all depends on his aims, however  if he wanted to do law, medicine or Egyptology he'd need general Abitur.

 

Thank you SD.  He had been interested in a career in teaching though only very few Unis would accept anthing less than general Abitur. Those that did accept FA were also very far from his home making study a very difficult prospect financially.  

 

I personally think he would be a brilliant Grundschule Lehrer though his careers advisor at school told him there weren't many jobs and that he should consider Bauingenieur (also seemingly limited job opportunities) Odd that the news recently referred to a lack of 25000 primary school teachers nationwide and that one in 5 primary schools has no head teacher.  And, the teacher crisis is only likely to worsen as supposedly, german Unis only have the capacity to qualify 7000 teachers per year.

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19 hours ago, emkay said:

I personally think he would be a brilliant Grundschule Lehrer though his careers advisor at school told him there weren't many jobs and that he should consider Bauingenieur (also seemingly limited job opportunities) Odd that the news recently referred to a lack of 25000 primary school teachers nationwide and that one in 5 primary schools has no head teacher.  And, the teacher crisis is only likely to worsen as supposedly, german Unis only have the capacity to qualify 7000 teachers per year.

 

I have known so many teachers here and even me ex wife was / is a teacher.  Seems like all of them suffer from 'the burn-out syndrome'.  I have my own opinion on that illness, akin to Zugluft, which as every German knows is the source of every illness from sore muscles to cancer. :blink:

 

It is very honourable to be a teacher and a thankless one.  Like the police, they too are underpaid and understaffed.  A mate here in the Allgäu was recently offered the position as Headmistress. Nice, that.  With a whopping 1.200€ more per year.  Oh, and she must continue teaching her classes as well.  So, double the work for an extra 100€ per month.  And the BLLV does little, I feel to support the teachers or fight for them. 

 

Again, the ex was a Grunschule Lehrerin.  She rarely had a parent who didn't blame her if the child did not make it into Gymnasium.  It was never the child's fault - always hers. 

 

Both police and teachers are honourable jobs and something, of which, we need more.  Either path is rewarding and stressful.  It would come down to which weapon he would prefer:  a gun or ruler! :lol:

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I was going to suggest that police work is probably more risky... but upon reflection...

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My daughter did a 2 week work experience with the police in Mühlheim (near Frankfurt) and she absolutely loved it.  She was seriously thinking about joining, until she did her Abitur.  By then, her ability at maths really shone through and she decided to study IT instead, but it was certainly an option at one time.

 

It's really difficult for most kids at 17/18 to decide what direction to take and career guidance doesn't really exists here.  Being a teacher is tough, but a very worthwhile and rewarding career, if it's something he has a natural ability for (which in my book, a lot of teachers don't!).  Whatever he decides, doing his Abi will give him more options and that's really important.

 

Respect for helping him with this, having someone there supporting and encouraging him is the best thing you can do for him at the moment.

 

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, BayrischDude said:

 

It was never the child's fault - always hers. 

Mostly the parent's fault no doubt.  We've heard of so many awful parent situations...alot like mental and emotional kid torture. 

 

Thank you so much for all your advice.  Very helpful to know some more about the different aspects of police careers. Sounds like it's best to start with the highest level of education.

 

5 hours ago, optimista said:

I was going to suggest that police work is probably more risky... but upon reflection...

 

5 hours ago, Tap said:

 

Respect for helping him with this, having someone there supporting and encouraging him is the best thing you can do for him at the moment.

 

 

We're really neither encouraging nor discouraging his choices as we're not his parents, just honorary parents.  He really is a great kid in every way and has pulled himself out of the educational gutter with determination and has exceeded all expectations.  His new found self belief is great to see.  Sadly though, careers advice is hard to find.  

 

If it were up to me, I'd discourage anything that might be dangerous. He already has a dangerous hobby...extreme downhill longboarding and we're always so relieved when he and his brother come home safely though we have taken them to the doctor and hospital a few times.  I can't even stand to watch any of their GoPro films...heart-stopping stuff :blink:

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Do students up your way get a copy of the fat (free) annual  paperback from Agent für Arbeit that lists all the different study etc. opportunities in Germany? Ours found it very useful to find out  the what , where and how .  Our local office always has copies for anyone interested.  Not a bad reference for expat parents either.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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24 minutes ago, easytodraw said:

Do students up your way get a copy of the fat (free) annual  paperback from Agent für Arbeit that lists all the different study etc. opportunities in Germany? Ours found it very useful to find out  the what , where and how .  Our local office always has copies for anyone interested.  Not a bad reference for expat parents either.

 

 

I haven't heard of it though I'll find out...thank you for the suggestion.

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3 hours ago, emkay said:

If it were up to me, I'd discourage anything that might be dangerous. He already has a dangerous hobby...extreme downhill longboarding and we're always so relieved when he and his brother come home safely though we have taken them to the doctor and hospital a few times.  I can't even stand to watch any of their GoPro films...heart-stopping stuff :blink:

 

I can truly understand your stand point on that.  Truly.  I'm sure we could all make a list of dangerous jobs.  And I will concede that discouragement from parents or honorary parents have possibly saved lives or even helped put kids on a path better suited. 

 

But we desperately need people for these dangerous jobs.  I know all too well the effects of these dangerous jobs.  I won't go into all the details, but I have been shot, stabbed and in numerous fights, but I am still around, functioning, happy, wacko, and well adjusted (eh, for the most part). :wacko::lol:

 

If all parents discouraged their children from dangerous jobs...  well, you can well imagine. ;)

 

He sounds like an adrenaline junkie, so I can full well sympathise with his idea of wanting LE.  

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I know a guy here in Germany who is a retired police officer.  Not due to age though, due to the fact that he was being bullied and asked to change districts and so they found him another district but they weren't very welcoming either and he was told that it would be better for him if he retired.  He now has enough for a meager lifestyle and can do a mini job on the side for extra cash.  He didn't complain about the work though.  He said for the most part, he was water police, policing the river or lake for unlicensed boaters or something like that.

 

And I have a cousin in Denmark who joined the police after getting bored in the military.  I don't really keep in touch with her much but last I heard from my mom, she's been written off sick due to burn-out.

 

 

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6 hours ago, BayrischDude said:

If all parents discouraged their children from dangerous jobs...  well, you can well imagine.

I can not only imagine but also have lived in such a country. Where the only difference between police and criminals was the uniform...

 

My uncle was a police officer in early 1990s but then the salary got rubbish due to currency depreciation and he left. What happens when you have a gun and no Rechtsstaat to supervise on how you use this gun, your salary is rubbish, and you have a family to feed, there is no Hartz IV? Yep, this is what happens: if you have some morals, you only accept bribes for closing criminal cases against the mafia, or for non-investigation of mafia murders. If you don't have morals at all, you murder for money personally...

 

These days the wages are better and there is some kind of control of what police do, yet no parents from middle class families (let alone the rich ones) would ever allow their children to go to the police. So, only psychos and kids from poor families apply for police jobs. Unfortunately.

 

Regarding risk... Smoking is more risky than any risk job ever. 

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Since my opening post here, my daughter's boyfriend decided that a police career is definitely his main ambition.  He's been to police adviser meetings in different Länder and all good suggesting that his academic results so far could get him into a higher level of police training. He's worked super hard at his physical fitness and even managed to raise the funds to pay for his driving licence which is a general prerequisite.

 

I feel very sad for him today because the required eye test for his driving licence identified a significant problem with one eye that he had never been aware of.  An eye doctor confirmed the problem today and told him that he doesn't believe that he will have the minimum sight requirement for any German police force. Application requires an attest from an eye doctor.  Seemingly, the problem could have been resolved at a younger age.  

 

A harsh end to this ambition though good to know that despite him feeling gutted, he believes there must be an even better opportunity out there....

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@emkay, I am colourblind.  Not severe, but enough so that most are aware.  I confuse numerous colours - red, orange and yellow - blues and purples - browns, greens and greys.  Those PIP tests are so much fun.  I see FA.  Out of a 20 card PIP test, I might see one hidden number.

When I joined the police, not being colourblind was mandatory.  I went to one exe doctor who said my level was extreme.  I preformed one test with an end result so odd, the doctor told me he had never seen someone do the test in the order I did. 

I finally found a doctor, who was older and I think the amount of fooks he had left to give were minimal.  This was his colourblind test and I am by no means not exaggerating.  He put three dropper bottles on the table in front of me with three different caps - one yellow, one green, one red.  I pointed to each and 10 minutes later I had a medical letter from him stating I was not colourblind.

A rather extreme and old fashioned way to hurdle a wee fence.  Somewhere out there could be an eye doctor willing to find a 'grey area' on the young man's police eye test.  ;)

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2 hours ago, emkay said:

Seemingly, the problem could have been resolved at a younger age. 

I wouldn't dwell on that too long. Spilt milk. And I would replace "could" with "might". I walked around as a small kid for four years with a plaster over one eye so the "lazy" one would get stronger. I hated it. And in the end it made not a blind bit of difference... cannot see how eyesight would be crucial if he were in forensics or criminology. Don't give up...

 

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13 hours ago, optimista said:

cannot see how eyesight would be crucial if he were in forensics or criminology. Don't give up...

Of all the human senses, eyesight is perhaps the most important one in LE, regardless the role.

My colourblindness could have been extremely problematic.  Luckily nothing derogatory happened in 24 years.  Hypothetically, a witness to a murder describes a suspect as wearing a purple hoodie.  I see a person who fits the physical description, but is wearing a blue hoodie.  Can you imagine where this could go?  If I had interrogated him, I could have been sued, all of my old cases reviewed again for discrepanices.  Would have been an utter mess.

If I collected a pair of red gloves as evidence and described them on the evidence voucher as orange, the evidence could have been suppressed.

A person working forensics need have good eyesight.  One can see fingerprints on a piece of glass, or a hair on a shirt, or small pieces of dirt on carpet.  If his eyesight is too poor to see those, it would be a hinderance to performing his job properly. 

However....  there is an area of LE where eyesight is not a huge factor:  IT / Security.  @emkay, it is an option.  Computer forensics, I think, he could do.  Depends upon how he feels sitting at a desk most of the day, but it is quite challenging and rewarding.  I worked one of the first website fraud investigations in Germany in 1998 and dabbled in it over the remainder of my career.  I had colleagues who excelled in that area and are truly swimming in money today.  Computer forensics are constantly changing and upgrading due to technology.  Worth a wee think.
 

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15 hours ago, optimista said:

I wouldn't dwell on that too long. Spilt milk. And I would replace "could" with "might". I walked around as a small kid for four years with a plaster over one eye so the "lazy" one would get stronger. I hated it. And in the end it made not a blind bit of difference... cannot see how eyesight would be crucial if he were in forensics or criminology. Don't give up...

 

 

From what the young man was told by his police advisor, there is a minimum level of vision necessary in order to apply irrespective of potential role. The Augenarzt stated that even with corrective glasses, this will fall just below.  

 

It is also a lazy eye problem that needed to be corrected ideally by the age of 9.  He'll most likely look for a second opinion.  @BayrischDude, I wonder if there's another Augenarzt out there with not many fooks left ;).  

 

 

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