Fiddling about with stocks, funds, etc. No conspiracy theories, please.

771 posts in this topic

9 minutes ago, john g. said:

. It depends on the individual‘s mentality and situation.

And your tax residence.

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14 minutes ago, john g. said:

Follow the news and see if a class action might take place. Then join the queue and be ready to pay the lawyers‘s fees and be ready to wait years and maybe be prepared to pay more fees. You are small fry, Renegade...that is the reality.

AFAIK, stock holders are last in line, no money left by then. Forget it.

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14 minutes ago, john g. said:

So how would YOU pick individual shares?

 

That is the 64 million dollar question.

 

First answer is it very difficult, I mean their is a lot of financial information out on the internet, some free some not. I have a kinda process in my mind, which I go through in order to determine if to buy or not. The factor include at least.

 

- The debt condition of the company ie equity to debt - useful to know how near a company is to going broke

- If the directors have a significant share holding, if they do not- they not that somethings bad with the company

- Always look at PE  rate, if you want a share for income, not share gain

- Look at the gross gearing

-Look across the internet for stories about companies, Wirecard - has some negative stories a long time a go

 

Then there are so many other checks depending on the sector of the share, eg house building stocks, make sure they have a very high equity to debt, airlines are very tricky, mining stock are even worse.

They normally produce reports says things like, we were  Lithium, but were slowed down because we had to clear so much diamonds and gold, therefore we need more money, buy more shares...

 

The list is endless, and you never really know what you are reading is correct

 

I cannot list here everything that is import to check before I would buy, buying shares is more like a hobby, or a profession. You do it because you like to do it and it makes money on top of it, other people have other hobbies there is not wrong with that either. 

 

You have to understand, nobody always makes the right decision as well, and  a lot of people just do not like any level of risk either - there is not ideal way forward, it will vary from person to person.

 

It would take pages and pages on all the checks, in different sectors you can make, so cannot be listed here - sorry

 

and as beth points out, just buying the S&P500 or a DAX tracker, will give the edge over most funds anyway 

 

 

14 minutes ago, john g. said:

 

 

Individual shares are for people with pocket money to spare and a who- gives- a- damn attitude if it goes tits up and „ hooray

like a hobby - putting coins into a gambling machine is also a hobby

 

- I have made 10 per cent this year..

 

thats nice, I made about 60 % last year on easyjet - Its quite easy to but, but its very hard to decide when to sell and look for something else

 

 but if the aim is to save long term eg for a pension- then spread your chances/risks in eg mutual funds

Mutual funds, always take the most to manage, a lot of the increase of the funds goes to the sellers of the fund and the managers of the fund, they are recommended because the sellers and managers make the most money out of them. Again S&P500 ETD/trakers will most of the time make more money than funds once the costs have been taken out.

 

14 minutes ago, john g. said:

 

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, yesterday said:

That is the 64 million dollar question.

 

First answer is it very difficult, I mean their is a lot of financial information out on the internet, some free some not. I have a kinda process in my mind, which I go through in order to determine if to buy or not. The factor include at least.

 

- The debt condition of the company ie equity to debt - useful to know how near a company is to going broke

- If the directors have a significant share holding, if they do not- they not that somethings bad with the company

- Always look at PE  rate, if you want a share for income, not share gain

- Look at the gross gearing

-Look across the internet for stories about companies, Wirecard - has some negative stories a long time a go

 

Then there are so many other checks depending on the sector of the share, eg house building stocks, make sure they have a very high equity to debt, airlines are very tricky, mining stock are even worse.

They normally produce reports says things like, we were  Lithium, but were slowed down because we had to clear so much diamonds and gold, therefore we need more money, buy more shares...

 

The list is endless, and you never really know what you are reading is correct

 

I cannot list here everything that is import to check before I would buy, buying shares is more like a hobby, or a profession. You do it because you like to do it and it makes money on top of it, other people have other hobbies there is not wrong with that either. 

 

You have to understand, nobody always makes the right decision as well, and  a lot of people just do not like any level of risk either - there is not ideal way forward, it will vary from person to person.

 

It would take pages and pages on all the checks, in different sectors you can make, so cannot be listed here - sorry

 

and as beth points out, just buying the S&P500 or a DAX tracker, will give the edge over most funds anyway 

 

 

Mutual funds, always take the most to manage, a lot of the increase of the funds goes to the sellers of the fund and the managers of the fund, they are recommended because the sellers and managers make the most money out of them. Again S&P500 ETD/trakers will most of the time make more money than funds once the costs have been taken out.

 

 

 

 

I didn‘t say I personally had made 10 per cent this year- it was a general statement about the way people react!

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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55 minutes ago, john g. said:

So how would YOU pick individual shares? Individual shares are for people with pocket money to spare and a who- gives- a- damn attitude if it goes tits up and „ hooray- I have made 10 per cent this year.. but next year?“ but if the aim is to save long term eg for a pension- then spread your chances/risks in eg mutual funds. Monthly is great to invest and make the most of the Cost Average Effect. Long term. 
And top up if you have loose change with one- off sums. It is nice to think „ ah, the price is low- I will buy more now. Or the price is high- I will sell some now.“

The problem- who REALLY knows if the price won‘t fall more or rise more? NOBODY.

It is NOT the timing that counts but the TIME IN.

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
4 minutes ago, john g. said:

I didn‘t say I personally had made 10 per cent this year- it was a general statement about the way people react!

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.

 

I am sorry from your original post 

 

you do say " I have made 10 per cent this year.", I assumed you made 10 profit on your investments, not 10 percent more tomatoes - or you were joking :)

 

 

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I let my financial adviser pick my investments. That is what he gets paid to do.

 

Back when I started out I used to study a lot and pick some of my own stocks. When he approved of them, they tended to do OK. When he advised against, they didn't do well at all. I did enjoy playing around. When I got into my 30's, I turned the reigns over to him. 

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Was listening to a German radio station, yesterday - it said that after the FT journalists, reported problems with Wirecard, that the German regulators talked to Wirecard, who saying everything is ok. Then the regulators started to threaten the FT journalists with being in league with shorters and other people trying to bring down Wirecard down without good reason they even talked about jail time for them, to get them to shut up. 

 

To me it just further undermines the the feeling i have towards the German financial system,  which comes on the back the the VW emissions scandal, and ADAC scandal, seems its easier for the Germans to lie through their teeth than properly regulate their profitable industries. Hopefully London/ NY regulators will keep up the standards

 

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ADAC is the car club with €3,5 billion in assets without a clear structure and no control, right?

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ADAC in 2014 and before, manipulated the result of the best car award, so that German cars would always win, ADAC was a trusted source of information on which cars were ok to buy, but after the scandal they were  shown to be baised

 

https://www.sueddeutsche.de/auto/manipulation-beim-gelben-engel-autohersteller-erwaegen-rueckgabe-von-adac-preis-1.1882155

 

https://www.thelocal.de/20140120/adac-boss-cooks-car-award-votes

https://www.ft.com/content/774ae82a-81b5-11e3-a600-00144feab7de

 

yes, Luke, that trusted ADAC firm

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I’ve just shared a couple beers with the  CEO of a daughter company of Wirecard with 600 employees. He was so blindsided as the rest and is extremely angry and upset to say the least. I’ll write a bit more later. 

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I'm not blindsided. I know somebody from the early days of Wirecard who hinted about the antics of upper management - enough to dissuade me from ever working there, especially when the first rumblings started years (!) ago.

The writing was on the wall for a long time, even going purely on publicised information.

 

But to quote the former CFO of my company: "Gier frisst Hirn" (greed destroys your brain, meaning people didn't want to know what was going on, even when it was staring them in the face).

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22 hours ago, yesterday said:

To me it just further undermines the the feeling i have towards the German financial system,  which comes on the back the the VW emissions scandal, and ADAC scandal, seems its easier for the Germans to lie through their teeth than properly regulate their profitable industries. Hopefully London/ NY regulators will keep up the standards

 

Hahaha. London? The largest offshore finance center in the world? Is that your standard?

Make a list of all offshore in the world. The vast majority are ex-British colonies with strong connection to London!

At least the British don't have to lie, the city of London has enough independence to show the middle finger to the rest of the world.

And that is the main reason that Brexit will be beneficial to Europe. No more meddling from the City on London in EU bank regulation.

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23 hours ago, yesterday said:

To me it just further undermines the the feeling i have towards the German financial system,  which comes on the back the the VW emissions scandal, and ADAC scandal, seems its easier for the Germans to lie through their teeth than properly regulate their profitable industries.

 

Add to that the large infrastructure projects (BER, Munich Rail Station), overseas bribery, you must conclude that germany is one of the most corrupt countries in the world.  In tune with the topic: I won't invest here.  There are too many reputable companies out there where you can read their annual report and be pretty sure it's accurate.

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Shit getting worst:

https://blog.pockit.com/important-update-pockit-accounts-temporarily-inaccessible-4b038228cc93

 

If banks are under regulated, these shitty pseudo banks are even worst. And they have no european bank deposit scheme. Meaning your money is simply gone

https://www.forbes.com/sites/barrycollins/2020/06/26/wirecard-collapse-drags-down-online-banking-services/#6ace6f1a2e28

 

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11 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

Shit getting worst:

https://blog.pockit.com/important-update-pockit-accounts-temporarily-inaccessible-4b038228cc93

 

If banks are under regulated, these shitty pseudo banks are even worst. And they have no european bank deposit scheme. Meaning your money is simply gone

https://www.forbes.com/sites/barrycollins/2020/06/26/wirecard-collapse-drags-down-online-banking-services/#6ace6f1a2e28

 

 

A bit of a farce now.

 

Wirecard up 50% this morning.

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Or down 85% since Wednesday. It's all a matter of perspective.

wirecard.JPG.8795220495dee0a05b546152a96

 

This is where the speculators and day traders come in, probably joined by some pump-and-dump fraudsters. You bought at €1 and sold at €3? Good for you! Bought at €3 and it dropped to €1.50 immediately afterwards? Sucks to be you!

 

Like I said, at this point, you're better off going to the casino roulette wheel and betting it all on black.

 

BTW: I previously said that Wirecard would be thrown out of the DAX at the end of the month. Apparently I was mistaken - the adjustments are quarterly and there is no provision for consequences in case of insolvency (which, like the Spanish Inquisition, nobody ever expected). So this dead cat will continue to be dragged over the coals and broken glass until mid-September.

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