Fiddling about with stocks, funds, etc. No conspiracy theories, please.

717 posts in this topic

On 02/12/2019, 18:08:09, fraufruit said:

I'm sorry that no one has gotten back to you. I don't know how to advise non EU people about investing in Germany. Maybe someone will read this and help.

 

While I'm here, is anyone invested in Varta? Himself is up 458% after buying some at the beginning of the year. Of course, he shoulda, woulda, coulda bought more.

 

Thank you, i didn't visit for a while but some people have responded. One more question as I see you are also very active in the real estate threads too. I want to buy a small apartment in about 18 months to 2 years, or when I can find something I like and can afford, I already have some money saved up and would like to use the time till then to to save up about 20% of the downpayment, do you think its best to just leave the money in a sparcard account with the ridiculous 0.001% interest rate and try and invest in ETFs and liquidate when i need it. I know the market isn't exactly stable and dependable but it seems the money will loose value just sitting in the account. I'm also happy to hear others opinion.

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1 minute ago, BethAnnBitt said:

You might try Deep L. It's regarded as a much better translator.  I learned about it from a software language translation expert.

Good to know, i will, thanks.

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5 minutes ago, Alteregouc said:

do you think its best to just leave the money in a sparcard account with the ridiculous 0.001% interest rate and try and invest in ETFs and liquidate when i need it.

 

You would need to know what fees and commissions you would have to pay to buy/sell the ETF to see if it is worthwhile. Maybe you just invest part of it.

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1 hour ago, Alteregouc said:

 

Thank you, i didn't visit for a while but some people have responded. One more question as I see you are also very active in the real estate threads too. I want to buy a small apartment in about 18 months to 2 years, or when I can find something I like and can afford, I already have some money saved up and would like to use the time till then to to save up about 20% of the downpayment, do you think its best to just leave the money in a sparcard account with the ridiculous 0.001% interest rate and try and invest in ETFs and liquidate when i need it. I know the market isn't exactly stable and dependable but it seems the money will loose value just sitting in the account. I'm also happy to hear others opinion.

Where do you want to buy? Within the Eurozone or elsewhere. If in the US I´d recommend a short-term debt fund like e. g. ICSH (yielding about 2.6%). Within the Eurozone I´m not aware of any ETF I´d recommend for such a short time period and with as little risk as you need for that purpose.

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18 hours ago, fraufruit said:

 

You would need to know what fees and commissions you would have to pay to buy/sell the ETF to see if it is worthwhile. Maybe you just invest part of it.

Thanks. I will take that into consideration

18 hours ago, BethAnnBitt said:

You might try Deep L. It's regarded as a much better translator.  I learned about it from a software language translation expert.

Good to know, i will, thanks.

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17 hours ago, jeba said:

Where do you want to buy? Within the Eurozone or elsewhere. If in the US I´d recommend a short-term debt fund like e. g. ICSH (yielding about 2.6%). Within the Eurozone I´m not aware of any ETF I´d recommend for such a short time period and with as little risk as you need for that purpose.

Eurozone, I am not a citizen of the US. Okay thanks, i will have to think it through

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1 hour ago, Alteregouc said:

Eurozone, I am not a citizen of the US. Okay thanks, i will have to think it through


Money I know I’ll need in less than two years I’d never invest, unless in amounts I  know I’ll be able to recoup in time or if you are flexible to postpone or cancel the purchase. Even if no major crisis  hits in the meantime, you’ll be jumping at shadows.

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On 8/30/2019, 12:13:24, CryptoAndBeyond said:

Does anyone uses traderepublic as a broker. On Verivox it shows no costs but can only be used to buy stocks from Germany.

 

https://traderepublic.com/?utm_source=financeads&pubID=27093&s_id=307318180X27093C274409001D

 

Are they good to get started at-least?

TradeRepublic.JPG

 

Hi everyone,

 

I'm somewhat surprised Trade Republic hasn't been mentioned since Aug 30, 2019. I was a bit skeptical at the beginning, and the opening process was somehow slow and tedious, but now I do think it has the potential to be a little revolution - at least in that it seems significantly cheaper than any other German online broker, which was precisely what kept me from "fiddling with stocks, funds, etc" myself :)

Back then it was only available to German nationals, but later it was extended to EU citizens with tax residence in Germany, too. Austria is next, they announced.

At that point I was able to open an account and, in my opinion, it's hard to see how other brokers can compare in the long run if Trade Republic keeps evolving and growing, despite being currently limited to the L&S exchange.

 

I'm basically a beginner with some understanding of markets and investments, mostly engaging in day & short term trading, both for fun and in order to gain more investing experience. I find TR to be the perfect tool for that! Sure, it doesn't offer every stock or ETF on the planet but there's still plenty to choose from.

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Hi,

 

can you explain me this 30% tax exemption for ETF that have a minimum % of stocks inside. I am reading a specialized forum in german using google translator but I am struggling to find complete information about the ETF taxation, normal Funds taxations, especiacially after the changes made on 2018.

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2 hours ago, Maarsch said:

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-51214824

I've not gotten on this bandwagon 5 times now. Because surely the hype will stop

 

 

When a car-making company, which has never made an annual profit, reaches a stock market value greater than any other auto manufacturer bar Toyota you know something's seriously wrong. It's been a long run and I don't know when it will come but a market correction is surely on the cards for the near future.

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16 hours ago, Frantic said:

Hi,

 

can you explain me this 30% tax exemption for ETF that have a minimum % of stocks inside. I am reading a specialized forum in german using google translator but I am struggling to find complete information about the ETF taxation, normal Funds taxations, especiacially after the changes made on 2018.

All I understand about it is that it´s a mess. You may be charged on fictitious profits you never had. Maybe @PandaMunich can explain?

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2 hours ago, jeba said:

All I understand about it is that it´s a mess. You may be charged on fictitious profits you never had. Maybe @PandaMunich can explain?


Jeba, you keep saying you’re German while at the same time showing an inability to search and understand simple concepts. What you just said has marginally to do with December’s law taxing options, etc

https://www.welt.de/finanzen/article205127736/Einkommensteuergesetz-Aenderung-mit-absurden-Folgen-fuer-Sparer.html

 

and nothing with the question.  So if you want to do the guy a favor translate the following text from test.de, 05.2019:

 

Teilfrei­stel­lungen entlasten Anleger

Als Ausgleich für geringere Erträge hält das Investment­steuerreformgesetz für Anleger eine Entschädigung bereit. Sie müssen nicht mehr für die gesamten Erträge Abgeltung­steuer abführen, sondern nur noch auf einen Teil. Die Höhe dieser Teilfrei­stellung hängt von der Fonds­art ab:

Bei einem Fonds, der fort­laufend mehr als 50 Prozent in Aktien anlegt, bekommt der Privat­anleger 30 Prozent der Ausschüttungen steuerfrei.

Bei einem Misch­fonds mit wenigs­tens 25 Prozent Aktien­anteil sind es 15 Prozent.

Besitzer von Immobilienfonds­anteilen bekommen eine Frei­stellung von 60 Prozent. Investiert der Fonds vor allem in ausländische Immobilien (zu mindestens 51 Prozent), sind sogar 80 Prozent steuerfrei.

Die Teilfrei­stel­lungen gelten für alle Erträge, also Dividenden und Verkaufs­gewinne – egal ob inländisch oder ausländisch. Gleich­zeitig ersetzt die neue Methode die Anrechnung der im Ausland gezahlten ausländischen Quellen­steuern im Rahmen der Steuererklärung. Für viele Anleger erübrigt sich so eine Menge Papierkrieg.

 

https://www.test.de/Fondsbesteuerung-ab-2018-Das-muessen-Sie-ueber-die-Fondssteuer-wissen-5124267-0/

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27 minutes ago, mtbiking said:


Jeba, you keep saying you’re German while at the same time showing an inability to search and understand simple concepts.

 

@jeba is like 80 years old, be patient, with luck we all will be there someday.

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42 minutes ago, Krieg said:

 

@jeba is like 80 years old, be patient, with luck we all will be there someday.


I didn’t know he is 80, in that case I take it back. My own father is 70 and tendentially easier to confuse.

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14 hours ago, fraufruit said:

And when it begins making profits?

 

Tesla stock price is being driven by speculative fever: you could double your money or halve it in a short space of time.

It's a trade for people with deep pockets.

In hindsight, the time to get into Tesla was a couple of years ago, after he stepped down and  paid his SEC fine and there was still plenty of room on the upside but comparing the fundamentals now the downside risk looks far too large - at least imho.

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I´m long on Tesla, have an average buy price of 220€, with some lots around 170€.

Valuation seems crazy if you compare to GM and Ford, but those are low margin car manufacturers.

Comparing with Mercedes or BMW, and considering sales values in 2021 and 2022, the valuation seems right.

Considering the long run, plus autonomous driving, plus energy sector, Tesla can go up 4x easily.

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Man, that coronavirus is tearing up the market today. Thought I might take advantage and pick up a cannabis stock since I don't have any. Guess what, they haven't gone down. :D

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Good morning,

 

I have a doubt about capital gains taxes and would like to have as much as possible a clear answer before I begin my ETF/Index funds adventure here in GErmany.

 

I work for an international organization, salary comes in NET form as per our agreement with German Govt. Am an EU citizen.  Have an ING DiBa account here in Germany.

 

  1. If I decide to buy let's say a few Vanguard ETFs/Index funds, I read on the ING website that ING automatically takes out taxes for me.  Is this the norm?
  2. Is ING as good as any other broker for these types of transactions or is there a much better one I should look at?
  3. Does this mean that I do not have to file taxes here in Germany? What is the percentage that is being witheld? 
  4. When I eventually decide to sell my positions what will be the tax percentage I will be subjected to?
  5. I assume that I don't have to pay taxes on these ETFs in my home country, is that correct?

 

Thanks to anyone who will shed light on the questions.

 

Regards,

 

Manuel

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