Why do you invest in property??

176 posts in this topic

15 minutes ago, Tim Hortons Man said:

She said he was always there. Attended all the school plays, did the teacher parent conferences etc. He said that work never took precedence over family. Very unusual to say the least!

 

A shame you think it's unusual. Many dads do the same. It's a choice.

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On 1/25/2018, 8:11:55, kirakay said:

I know quite a number of people who have working (are working) up into their 80's as they loved(d) what they do ... personally I am doing a work I love and could imagine doing it way past 65 and if I am healthy and well I would want to do that. Why 'retire' when you love what you do? Especially if you still make the time to do all things you love additionally anyways?  I assume if you have a work/job you are not that into or feel it limits other things you wish to do then sure retirement can be a good fit. Personally I have focused on creating a life I enjoy now :P

 

I love my job, I work as a scientist. It is always interesting and every year things change. I don't like my colleagues though :P Because of my degree and education I can work almost anywhere in the world with hardly any barriers. And I am paid well. I already do some of those things I mentioned already, but in small slivers because I have twins, a wife, and a 9-5 job. 

 

Achieving financial independence and 'retiring' means to me simply having the freedom to do what I want when I want and with the people I want. If you enjoy all aspects to your work (including your coworkers/clients/etc) , more power to you.

 

But to those that 'love their work so much they will work forever... until they die' can you really say you could stop working any time you wanted to and shift gears if you wanted (eg. travel the world for a year, or go meditate like the Buddha for 6 months, whatever you want) ? Working until you die implies that you are not saving for retirement, and you *have* to work. Am I wrong? A sailor can love his work and want to do it forever.. but there comes a time..

 

But yes, early retirement is not always all that is cracked up to be.. 

http://philip.greenspun.com/materialism/early-retirement/

 

 

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12 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

A shame you think it's unusual. Many dads do the same. It's a choice.

 

I sometimes miss interesting work but never regret dumping it for kids. it was a lot to give up - back then I was the dogs bollocks to many military folks, knew my stuff well and was paid well. Tax free, travelled the world, scuba dived for my job. Slept in Mongolian yurts (gers). Ballooned over the Masai Mara. Gave it up to raise kids.

 

Do I regret it? Hell yeah. Buggers. I want my life back.

 

Can you get kids back in the womb at all?

 

 

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On 1/15/2018, 9:23:28, john g. said:

Buy a nice..but really nice place...on Crete, don´t rent it out, live there and enjoy the sunshine! QED!!;) NO tax stuff..just quality of life...

 

was combing through this thread when I came across your post...  Is Crete really what it's said to be @john g.?? I badly miss sunshine and the smell of salty waters... I met a young Greek musician once and she told me Corfu is The place to move to... only question is, can one survive in Greece without speaking Greek and if we bought a home there and it needed repairs, can we trust local handymen not to charge us an arm and a leg? 

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7 hours ago, udomin said:

 

was combing through this thread when I came across your post...  Is Crete really what it's said to be @john g.?? I badly miss sunshine and the smell of salty waters... I met a young Greek musician once and she told me Corfu is The place to move to... only question is, can one survive in Greece without speaking Greek and if we bought a home there and it needed repairs, can we trust local handymen not to charge us an arm and a leg? 

You might want to have a look at Cyprus if getting around in English is important for you. Almost everyone speaks English (to some extent at least, since it used to be an English colony) and even government forms are usually available in English. Providers of electricty, telephone services, internet, banks etc. all have English websites. Local handymen are way cheaper than in Germany. Plus on average Cypriots are a very friendly bunch.

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8 hours ago, wien4ever said:

But to those that 'love their work so much they will work forever... until they die' can you really say you could stop working any time you wanted to and shift gears if you wanted (eg. travel the world for a year, or go meditate like the Buddha for 6 months, whatever you want) ? Working until you die implies that you are not saving for retirement, and you *have* to work. Am I wrong? A sailor can love his work and want to do it forever.. but there comes a time..

 

@wien4ever I have focused on evolving into a work I love and created a work/lifestyle that allows me to travel (a lot) and indeed I do go and meditate for a month here and there (Himalayan mountains each year this year in the Australian outback too) quite regularly! I am self employed and therefore can choose who works for me so I have some great people who I really enjoy and feel like family with with whom I work. If I do need to, lets say because of my health or I get to 65 think I dont want to work, then yes I have created a financial security that would provide. But I have more focused on living now than living then. I do realise that is not the way we are conditioned to think by society and our systems but I personally feel it is a healthier way to view one's life. I also note it may not be other people's cup of tea but I do want to say it is possible :P

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Sounds pretty good so far! 

Since our daughter is still in Grundschule & we'd (probably) like her to finish school here first, buying anything outside of Munich would either be a holiday home & an investment. 

Question is whether a property in Cyprus would make a sound investment? 

There's also the concern of safety. Can we leave a property safely unattended for a stretch of a few months? We considered getting an apartment in Penang island, Malaysia but there's such a good chance of break-ins - when owners are absent for a long time - we've abandoned that idea.

We also explored Thailand but were told it's difficult to get our money out of the country if we were ever to sell the property. 

 

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13 minutes ago, udomin said:

Question is whether a property in Cyprus would make a sound investment? 

I´d say possibly. Depends a lot of where you buy. Property prices seem to have bottomed (http://www.news.cyprus-property-buyers.com/2018/01/19/cyprus-house-price-index-falls/id=00153143) though in some places they are still unreasonably high. Others are dirt cheap. I was offered apartements built during the crisis in 2008 and never been lived in for € 30000.- . But you can also find whole villages at the beach which are newly built and have been standing empty for years - but houses there still cost 7 digit sums.

 

17 minutes ago, udomin said:

There's also the concern of safety. Can we leave a property safely unattended for a stretch of a few months?

Cyprus has the lowest crime rate within the EU. But you´d still better have someone to keep an eye on your property while you´re away. Shouldn´t be too difficult to find someone though. There are many British having holiday homes here. There are also a few English forums for Cyprus, the biggest probably being http://www.easterncyprus.com/index.php (still small when compared to TT). You could ask for opinions / experiences of others there. I´m lucky as I have nice and helpful neighbours who have been looking after my (rented) place when I was away.

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I think it's a good idea in Germany to invest in property for your own housing in the future. Who knows if you will always be able to find landlords here willing to rent you an apartment or room when you are Ü70. I have heard that people in that age have a hard time finding a landlord willing to give them a chance and some get kicked out of their apartment when they reach that age (is that legal?). Where are they supposed to go? 

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5 hours ago, cybil said:

I think it's a good idea in Germany to invest in property for your own housing in the future. Who knows if you will always be able to find landlords here willing to rent you an apartment or room when you are Ü70. I have heard that people in that age have a hard time finding a landlord willing to give them a chance and some get kicked out of their apartment when they reach that age (is that legal?). Where are they supposed to go? 

 

I rent to an old lady whos like 82. Really nice person but everyday I wonder what the process is with dealing with dead bodies here. Call the police? Fire dept? Not trying to be an ass but shes 82. Its gonna happen sooner than later. 

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:DI´ve greened you because you have made me laugh!!!

Just chuck her carcass out in the street, Petro! It might still be allowed under some obscure medieval law...

If you don´t have the guts for that: police and ambulance...

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4 minutes ago, john g. said:

:DI´ve greened you because you have made me laugh!!!

Just chuck her carcass out in the street, Petro! It might still be allowed under some obscure medieval law...

If you don´t have the guts for that: police and ambulance...

 

Ohhh I like it. Which bin do I stuff her in? The food waste or the paper? Then I can collect her social security checks and get caught in a few years and be on the news. Ill be famous!

 

 

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You´re famous already, Petro!!:lol:

Any bin will do..but food waste is best..I think it´s collected more frequently!!!

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5 hours ago, cybil said:

I have heard that people in that age have a hard time finding a landlord willing to give them a chance and some get kicked out of their apartment when they reach that age (is that legal?). Where are they supposed to go? 

 

I have no idea if landlords have a problem renting to elderly people but kicking them out if they are already there is hard.  Landlords in Germany have limited rights to kick people out.  If the person is behaving and paying rent, the only acceptable reason would be if the landlord himself or a close family member needs the apartment.  Still, the elderly person could claim hardship and make sure they have a long time to move.  If they've been in the apartment for 8 years or longer, they already have a 9 month notice but if the courts give them hardship due to their old age and poor health, it may give them even more notice or even stop them being kicked out alltogether.

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5 minutes ago, john g. said:

You´re famous already, Petro!!:lol:

Any bin will do..but food waste is best..I think it´s collected more frequently!!!

 

Where I live they are not collected more frequently but I think dead bodies would definitely go in the green bin (bio waste) unless the person had been fitted with spare parts, then you'd possibly have to operate in order to put all the parts in the proper bins.

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20 hours ago, udomin said:

 

was combing through this thread when I came across your post...  Is Crete really what it's said to be @john g.?? I badly miss sunshine and the smell of salty waters... I met a young Greek musician once and she told me Corfu is The place to move to... only question is, can one survive in Greece without speaking Greek and if we bought a home there and it needed repairs, can we trust local handymen not to charge us an arm and a leg? 

Crete is lovely -300 days of sunshine guaranteed..though it can be very stormy and cold in winter (many mountains ) and an island with wind changing frequently - if a South wind from the Sahara, get ready to clean your walls and patio floor from sand..but it´s warm..if a North wind...that´s coming from horrible climates up North...and can bring cold...(eg tonight!!)

 

Yes, you can survive without Greek but best to learn the lingo as best you can..it´s much appreciated and doors will open with friendliness.

No, you can´t trust local handymen not to rip you off ( with a smile )...you don´t get receipts, the timekeeping is appalling, you never know when someone will turn up...and workmanship is usually shoddy..you have to keep fussing to do it again..sigh, naivety doesn´t help...

 

What´s really good? You never feel anyone is creeping up on you from behind to mug you...very safe feelings...

 

What´s really bad? They are shitty with pets..really shitty...

 

PS: if you like ancient widows, plenty of choice in our village!!!;) A possible new tenant in case your tenant leaves you? !!!

 

 

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2 minutes ago, LeonG said:

 

I have no idea if landlords have a problem renting to elderly people ....

 

 

I would be reluctant to let to someone elderly on a very tight income for the reasons you spell out. It could be impossible get rid of the tenant even if there's Eigenbedarf, or the landlord might be required to pay for the moving costs.

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10 minutes ago, LeonG said:

 

Where I live they are not collected more frequently but I think dead bodies would definitely go in the green bin (bio waste) unless the person had been fitted with spare parts, then you'd possibly have to operate in order to put all the parts in the proper bins.

 

Gotcha good to know. I was a CSI in the states and have stuck my fingers in many a bullet hole looking for bullets, I should be able to figure out the removal of a pacemaker or a metal hip.

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