How to avoid a back-charge for health insurance in Germany: Foreign private? AOK? TK? Central? Tips?

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Hi guys,

 

I've been officially registered in Berlin as my Hauptwohnsitz (main residence) since October 2015. I have no health insurance and have not been employed or earning any income.

 

N.B. Any quick responses are appreciated as I may need to tell my new employer today to hold off on getting me my first German social security number if indeed this will open Pandora's box. See below.

 

Questions:

 

-Is there a particular Krankenkasse I can sign up to not back-charge me for two years of no health insurance?

- Or can I now sign up with a cheap foreign health insurance company (i.e. UK based) to either just count as my ongoing insurance or to present to my upcoming Krankenkasse so that they don't think I have been uninsured and maybe then don't back-charge me?

- If I do end up having to pay back-charges, how much will that be based on no income? (I'm still actually registered in the UK as a freelancer but have submitted £0 tax returns for a couple of years)

- Today I am signing up with Deliveroo as a freelance bike courier. I have to get a Gewerbeschien for that. If I cancel the Foodora job and just take the Deliveroo freelancer job, can I stay off the health insurance radar?

- Whether I work for Foodora and Deliveroo or just Deliveroo, does the fact that I will probably be only earning under €1500 mean my health insurance premiums will be only circa €150 per month from now on? (Presuming I don't just take some kind of cheap foreign health insurance?

 

Useful background info:

 

I am from the UK where the NHS just happens automatically, so obligatory health insurance is unfamiliar to me. I have not been employed or earning any money while I have been in Germany. I have just been using savings to renovate a mixed use Gewerbeeinheit property where I have been living, with the aim of setting up a business in the property, maybe.

 

Money is nearly out, so, yesterday, I signed an employment contract with Foodora for circa €850 per month as a bike courier to keep me afloat financially while I renovate. Today I will also sign up with Deliveroo on a freelance basis to earn roughly €15 per hour for a number of hours of my choosing on top of Foodora.

 

I wasn't sure if I would be in Germany for long at all at first and don't plan to be here for more than the next 3-4 years, so health insurance into old age is not an issue for me. I have just attended to any health queries on my visits to the UK for the moment, but that seems untenable for the next few years, so heath insurance would be a plus, but not if it is just asking for trouble.

 

Toytown research:

 

N.B. I have read a few similar posts and feel a new post is worthwhile as the useful posts I found were old and things change. I'm particularly hoping that @PandaMunich and @Starshollow or @john g.may have some good input. There was talk in earlier posts by @john g. of Central stopping but then reverting to back-charging, which seemed particularly relevant:

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/203249-health-insurance-backpayment-finished/?page=1

From @lightcycle:

"A friend of mine recently got health insurance with AOK after two years of no insurance, she asked them if they were going to back-charge her for that time and they said "no, we don't do that anymore".

Anyone heard anything similar? Have they really stopped the back-charging nonsense?"

 

From @john g.

"lightcycle: that´s interesting! I´m surprised but glad! I work in the insurance business and I know there´s one private health insurer which is no longer enforcing backpayments. Where will it lead? Don´t know...we´ve been through this before. A big private insurer, Central, did this in 2009 and got a lot of business. I know I got people insured there for that very reason. Then other private insurers got annoyed - as did the Govt. Central had to backtrack.

The whole issue is absurd - how can you backcharge people for services they haven´t had? Bloody ridiculous."

 

Thanks for your help! It is appreciated! :)

 

Related posts I have viewed:

 

Good overall wiki article by Patrick Ott (@StarsHollow):

https://www.toytowngermany.com/wiki/Health_insurance

 

A very relevant yet old and long post widely discussed by key Toytown players (as quoted above):

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/203249-health-insurance-backpayment-finished/?page=1

 

Some relevant info from the UK gov:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/living-in-germany#health

 

Short but sweet on a similar topic:

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/134167-implications-of-having-no-health-insurance/

 

A guy sadly getting slagged off for asking a question:

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/355342-billed-for-not-having-health-insurance/?page=4


 

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8 hours ago, YogaMonkey said:

If I cancel the Foodora job and just take the Deliveroo freelancer job, can I stay off the health insurance radar?

 

Yes.

 

Not relevant to this thread, but I expect Deliveroo and others of its ilk to be - at some point in the future - to be audited and to be then obliged to backpay social security contributions for all the people it exploited. But that would be Deliveroo's problem, not yours:

 

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2 hours ago, PandaMunich said:

Yes.

 

Not relevant to this thread, but I expect Deliveroo and others of its ilk to be - at some point in the future - to be audited and to be then obliged to backpay social security contributions for all the people it exploited. But that would be Deliveroo's problem, not yours:

 

 

Hi @PandaMunich! Thanks, as always, for an insightful response.

 

Since I made this post, I had my Deliveroo interview and got the job as a self-employed delivery rider. I also spoke to a lovely woman at TK who explained to me that they would accept an E104 or other document: such as a scan of my EHIC card, which would prove my previous insurance was the NHS. This should have been doable for me as I never officially left the UK.

 

I mentioned the fact that I had been registered and living here in Berlin, but she said that wouldn't be a problem if I could prove previous NHS (state provided) health insurance up until recently. A valid EHIC card would have done that, for instance. I suspect my current EHIC card has expired, but https://www.ehic.org.uk allows UK residents to get a new EHIC card with an expiry date into the future, and, crucially, no start date (I think)

 

See example exhibit A:

Untitled.jpeg.dbb11add3850ba6f36b2c3a7c0

 

With regards to the E104 form, that seemed the most proper way of doing things, but even the lady at TK said that potential customers and TK themselves had real problems getting the NHS to issue them.

 

I then came across this post: https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/161057-getting-an-e104-form-for-health-insurance/?page=2 , which is incredibly relevant (and perhaps this post of mine should be folded into that post).

 

This comment https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/161057-getting-an-e104-form-for-health-insurance/?do=findComment&comment=1878934 gave me the idea that maybe my new Foodora employer might just tie everything up nicely and would perhaps negate the possible perilous need to clarify previous health insurance, a tricky problem for UKers at the best of times.

 

So, I phoned up to ask the following:

Q: If I were to let Foodora get my social security number and set-up my health insurance with TK, as they are obliged to by law, would that remove the burden of proof and health insurance would just happen without any back-charges?

Answer from lovely TK woman: By allowing my 1st German social security number and health insurance for my first job in Germany to be set-up by Foodora, the  whole process seems to become compulsory, so there is no need to provide torturous evidence of previous de-facto NHS insurance via E104 directly from the NHS, scan of EHIC card , doctors letter or whatever. So, that's a winner. If I later decide to leave Foodora and just work freelance for Deliveroo (because it pays better and is more flexible), then I would transition to paying roughly half of 15% of gross wage (gross wage = only circa €1000) as an employee, to paying a minimum of ca. €320 as a mandatory contribution for a self-employed person, no matter how little I was earning.

 

The beauty is, that even if I have worked for just 1 day with TK cover for Foodora, then if I do transition to self-employed work, the previous health insurance will be just listed as TK with Foodora: end of problem. If I end up earning more from Deliveroo than I do from Foodora, which is a possibility, then I will actually be obliged to stop getting my health insurance via the Foodora employer and actually have to pay €320 a month as a freelancer. I don't mind paying health insurance if I'm making good money, so that all seems fine.

 

If the above is all correct, then this opens up the interesting opportunity for people to take on a first job in Germany for a few days for the sole purpose of ensuring that back-charges in health insurance don't have to be paid! This only works, of course, if they never had any income in the time they were living in Germany without health insurance.

 

The other way round this catch 22 situation seems to be open to you if you never officially left the UK, in which case you can still prove you were NHS insured (via E104 or EHIC card etc.) until whenever the date is that you choose to start German health insurance.

 

This is a bit of a workaround, but I think it's fair. I don't think it's workable or in the spirit of the European Union to back-charge people for not signing up to German health insurance when they probably didn't even realise they needed it because they were dealing with the catch 22 of getting an address, an Anmeldung, a Schufa and a bank account. Or, they were just wandering around Europe and weren't really settled anywhere, which kind of happened to me.

 

So, I hope this is useful to people. Any thoughts from the experts on the viability of such plans?

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1 hour ago, YogaMonkey said:

Q: If I were to let Foodora get my social security number and set-up my health insurance with TK, as they are obliged to by law, would that remove the burden of proof and health insurance would just happen without any back-charges?

 

Unfortunately, no.

 

Health insurances ask for your Meldebestätigung, which lists the date you registered in Germany, and they will then backcharge you to that date.

Which is why I suggested the de-registration game to EU citizens:

and:

 

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1 hour ago, YogaMonkey said:

 

Hi @PandaMunich! Thanks, as always, for an insightful response.

 

Since I made this post, I had my Deliveroo interview and got the job as a self-employed delivery rider. I also spoke to a lovely woman at TK who explained to me that they would accept an E104 or other document: such as a scan of my EHIC card, which would prove my previous insurance was the NHS. This should have been doable for me as I never officially left the UK.

 

I mentioned the fact that I had been registered and living here in Berlin, but she said that wouldn't be a problem if I could prove previous NHS (state provided) health insurance up until recently. A valid EHIC card would have done that, for instance. I suspect my current EHIC card has expired, but https://www.ehic.org.uk allows UK residents to get a new EHIC card with an expiry date into the future, and, crucially, no start date (I think)

 

See example exhibit A:

Untitled.jpeg.dbb11add3850ba6f36b2c3a7c0

 

With regards to the E104 form, that seemed the most proper way of doing things, but even the lady at TK said that potential customers and TK themselves had real problems getting the NHS to issue them.

 

I then came across this post: https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/161057-getting-an-e104-form-for-health-insurance/?page=2 , which is incredibly relevant (and perhaps this post of mine should be folded into that post).

 

This comment https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/161057-getting-an-e104-form-for-health-insurance/?do=findComment&comment=1878934 gave me the idea that maybe my new Foodora employer might just tie everything up nicely and would perhaps negate the possible perilous need to clarify previous health insurance, a tricky problem for UKers at the best of times.

 

So, I phoned up to ask the following:

Q: If I were to let Foodora get my social security number and set-up my health insurance with TK, as they are obliged to by law, would that remove the burden of proof and health insurance would just happen without any back-charges?

Answer from lovely TK woman: By allowing my 1st German social security number and health insurance for my first job in Germany to be set-up by Foodora, the  whole process seems to become compulsory, so there is no need to provide torturous evidence of previous de-facto NHS insurance via E104 directly from the NHS, scan of EHIC card , doctors letter or whatever. So, that's a winner. If I later decide to leave Foodora and just work freelance for Deliveroo (because it pays better and is more flexible), then I would transition to paying roughly half of 15% of gross wage (gross wage = only circa €1000) as an employee, to paying a minimum of ca. €320 as a mandatory contribution for a self-employed person, no matter how little I was earning.

 

The beauty is, that even if I have worked for just 1 day with TK cover for Foodora, then if I do transition to self-employed work, the previous health insurance will be just listed as TK with Foodora: end of problem. If I end up earning more from Deliveroo than I do from Foodora, which is a possibility, then I will actually be obliged to stop getting my health insurance via the Foodora employer and actually have to pay €320 a month as a freelancer. I don't mind paying health insurance if I'm making good money, so that all seems fine.

 

If the above is all correct, then this opens up the interesting opportunity for people to take on a first job in Germany for a few days for the sole purpose of ensuring that back-charges in health insurance don't have to be paid! This only works, of course, if they never had any income in the time they were living in Germany without health insurance.

 

The other way round this catch 22 situation seems to be open to you if you never officially left the UK, in which case you can still prove you were NHS insured (via E104 or EHIC card etc.) until whenever the date is that you choose to start German health insurance.

 

This is a bit of a workaround, but I think it's fair. I don't think it's workable or in the spirit of the European Union to back-charge people for not signing up to German health insurance when they probably didn't even realise they needed it because they were dealing with the catch 22 of getting an address, an Anmeldung, a Schufa and a bank account. Or, they were just wandering around Europe and weren't really settled anywhere, which kind of happened to me.

 

So, I hope this is useful to people. Any thoughts from the experts on the viability of such plans?

You didn´t want to open Pandora´s box this morning but you´ve opened Panda´s box!

Panda is right - backpayments if you sign up as an employee now.

You could go that way and be nicely insured and legal ect - that´s fine.

You could also do a legally acceptable private international insurance for a year, then become an employee and get onto public insurance without backpayments.

 

<_<(By the way, I was awake when you posted early this morning - following the Test Match in Australia!! ) but that excitement took over me...and I have been busy ever since...)

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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Thanks for the reply @PandaMunich.

 

12 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

Health insurances ask for your Meldebestätigung, which lists the date you registered in Germany, and they will then backcharge you to that date.

 

Checking the Meldebestätigung would be consistent with Germany's fun approach to enforcement and obligatory health insurance, but I did ask this specific question several times and the TK lady did confirm more than once that getting the insurance for a 1st employment in Germany via Foodora would definitely not cause a problem with my earlier Meldebestätigung, so she would have to be COMPLETELY wrong, which would be annoying as I've just sent in the TK application form.

 

18 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

Which is why I suggested the de-registration game to EU citizens

 

The problem with this novel staregy is that I am Angemeldet since the purchase date of the property I own and have lived in since purchase. As you might remember from earlier fun tax questions in another topic, this may be very important if I get fed up of Germany and just sell up and leave I.e. Not having to pay capital gains tax. If I deregister and then reregister at a more recent date, then I am losing the capability to sell without capital gains tax for selling a property I have lived in since purchase.

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The TK lady is completely wrong...

I am currently dealing with a number of such cases and - in each case - a major stumbling block is registration and backpayments...

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Thanks for the reply and insight @john g.

 

39 minutes ago, john g. said:

You could also do a legally acceptable private international insurance for a year, then become an employee and get onto public insurance without backpayments.

 

Coudl you explain why/how a legally acceptable private international insurance allows me to avoid backcharges, when German insurers don't achieve that?

Specifically:

- How much would such international insurance cost roughly? (Earnings from the one or two delivery courier jobs will be a maximum of €2000 per month and probably more like €1000)

- Why does it need to be a YEAR of internatonal insurance/?

- Would I have to be freelance during that year? That is significant because being an employee will only cost me roughly €75-€100 a month to get health insurance (half of 15%), whereas if I had to be freelance and pay a mimimum of €320 per month for a year, that would represent an extra amount spent which is roughly half the bill that I may get lumped with in back-charges I.e. €320-€100 = €220 extra paid per month if I am freelance.

(I expect that the worst case back-charge scenario would be that I would have to pay ca. €180 per month as an unemployed person for the two years I've been in Germany without insurance. Correct? And how could I prove this no income? I have zero income tax returns from UK, for instance.

 

- Do you have a good international insurance company you could suggest? (and maybe make a referral comission from as it's your job) I can give you a call if you like.

 

P.s. Hope you enjoyed the cricket. I couldn't sleep stressing about this debacle.

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 For those  UK citizens who read this and think about moving to Germany to live and work, Please- read the UK  Gov. website. This clearly outlines what is needed for tax, registration and Health care coverage.  I really wonder at those who blithely take off without due research.  Thankfully, people like john g, Panda, Starshollow, Engelchen help to explain these issues.

 

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Private international insurers are not travel insurances but are usually considered legal " currency " if switching later from one to eg TK. I do this very often with clients who have to start with a non-German insurance first before they eg at some stage get into the KSK as " employed artists " - and there´s never a problem with backpayments..

The point is NOT being insured at all means German companies either won´t accept you or charge backpayments. In the case of German public insurance, you cannot apply to them as a freelancer/self-employed if you have been registered in Germany for over three months already. 

International contracts are yearly, renewable, because they are NOT travel insurances! Yes, not for employees...only German insurances are acceptable if you have a German work contract. 

 

Private insurance (whether international or German ) is NOT dependent on income but on age, health, chosen tariff etc.

Please feel free to PM me with an email address if you wish! No problem.

 

(cricket was great and will be up at the crack of dawn tomorrow again for the finale!!)

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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I find it hard to believe that you are only now capable of doing all this research about health insurance, yet claim "total ignorance" for the years prior.

 

come on, man.  You sound like you were more than happy to fly under the radar but now you're out of cash and looking for a way out

 

if john can get you out of this I certainly hope you will send him a fabulously expensive give in thanks.

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5 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

if john can get you out of this I certainly hope you will send him a fabulously expensive give in thanks.

 

Perhaps a Yogamonkey would be appropriate.  Sure @johng  would love one.

yoga.jpg

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To anyone with either problems in the visa v health insurance Catch 22 or for people struglling with potential back-charges or Krankenkasse refusals to insure those who have lived without health insurance, @john g. has a collection of clever and legitimate solutions, including using international insurance allowed in Germany, which could have worked out as cheap as €112 per month for me. For any self-employed people facing potentially high minimum monthly payments of €300+, this could really be a winner. John was kind enough to call and talk me through this.

 

I again called TK and a seocnd operator confirmed that getting my insurance through Foodora as an employee would remove any possibility of back charges. John continues to refute this based on many cases of personal experience helping people, so that's all quite baffling.

 

Thanks @john g.  and @PandaMunich for your assistance. I'm gonna let the options sit with me. In the meantime, I've cancelled the Foodora employed job with associated TK health insurance to give me some breathing space. I still have the Deliveroo freelance contract to earn some money, with the option of @john g.'s international insurance + a Gewerbeschein + paying relevant income taxes, which I could live with.

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Hello YogaMonkey! I had an email today from someone who had a low paid  employee job from sometime in 2016 till January 2017, obviously with public health insurance. He has not paid health insurance contributions since then.  He has now been offered a job which would include compulsory public health insurance based on his salary but TK has asked him to backpay to February 2017.- 4,000 euros...

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Hi @john g. 4000 euros is not cheap. So, in a situation like that, is that person now on the radar and its officially known that they must have to pay the €4000 euros, or is there a way for them to get out of that by one of the following:

1, Just go with another public insurer, e.g. AOK, and tell them they just arrived, hoping they don't check the Meldebestätigung;

2, Using a strategy of getting insured with international insurance, e.g. ALC, and then listing ALC as the 'last insurer' when signing back on to compulsory health insurance;

3, Playing the deregister/re-register game and then presenting the new Meldebastätigung to a new insurer;

4, Presenting proof of ongoing NHS insurance - for instance an EHIC card, a letter form GP confirming registration until recently ,or the elusive E104 form - and then just claiming you are freshly arrived in Germany and hoping they just don't check the Meldebestätigung.

 

I had an interesting chat with another insurance broker recently, who suggested that 9 times out of 10 the Krankenkasse people (TK, AOK etc.) don't check the Meldebestätigung anyway, so they just go on what you tell them. He also suggested that there is no international insurance that is actually 'allowed' to replace German public health insurance. If that were the case, then this would mean that the main purpose of the international insurance would be to be able to provide a 'previous insurance' when signing up to a Krankenkasse. If that is accurate, then, in my case, could I not just provide a current EHIC card as proof of previous insurance?

 

In any case, the potential actual employment and obligatory health insurance with Foodora is now ancelled and I am freelancing. I don't intend to ever be 'employed' by a German company, so that may simplify things. I am not prepared to be forced to pay monthly health insurance for periods when I am not in the country. My whole life is about being upwardly mobile and being able to move between countries as and when I choose. Germany seems, sadly, to be a bad choice for me. Britain is much simpler for this kind of thing, but who knows how Brexit will change that!

 

Thanks for all the great insights!

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15 minutes ago, YogaMonkey said:

My whole life is about being upwardly mobile and being able to move between countries as and when I choose.

 

Not looking good for you then.

Campaigns for UK citizens in Europe and EU citizens in the UK have branded today’s deal “a double disaster”. Jane Golding, the chair of British in Europe, said:

This deal is even worse than we expected. After 18 months of wrangling, the UK and EU have sold 4.5 million people down the river in a grubby bargain that will have a severe impact on ordinary people’s ability to live their lives as we do now.

This is a double disaster for British people living in Europe. At the moment, not only is it unclear whether we keep our automatic residency rights, but it looks like we can also kiss goodbye to continuing free movement beyond any agreed transition period – which so many of us who work across Europe rely on to support our families.

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Why are people surprised-the vote was to leave  the EU.  The UK will be clamping down on  workers, why should  the EU be any different?? Now Brits may be treated in  the same way  as other non EU citizens. That may include  no 3 month coverage with NHS card.

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On 05/12/2017, 17:48:42, john g. said:

The TK lady is completely wrong...

 

 

It should be noted that TK has in other instances been audited before and following that scrambled to get their things in order - and that means retroactive. A couple years ago on student insurances for example, for which TK originally never demanded to see proof of enrolment.

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5 hours ago, kato said:

It should be noted that TK has in other instances been audited before and following that scrambled to get their things in order - and that means retroactive. A couple years ago on student insurances for example, for which TK originally never demanded to see proof of enrolment.

 

Hi Kato,

 

That's certainly interesting, and leads me to a question I've been wondering about ghis whole thing; Where does the buck stop? I.e. TK and other Krankenkasse are private companies as far as I understand, and so it's not necessarily in their interest to be stringent in enforcing policy like back-charges, Meldebestätigung dates and, as you've mentioned: student enrolments. So, the TK may ask for back-payments, or they may not, but you can just go to another Krankenkasse, such as AOK, for instance, and change your story (international insurance, NHS, register/re-register, only just arrived in Germany) to avoid back-payments.

 

These are the key questions:

 

Q - Do TK and other Krankenkasse actually have access to local Amt records to check Meldebestätigung dates etc?

Q - Is there actually a government agency somewhere which can cross data boundaries and check Bürgeramts' Meldebestätigungs records, social security records, Gewerbeschein dates for freelancers, university records, residency/visa rights and other records and put it all together to legally make you pay back charges? So far, I've just heard about Krankenkasses asking for back- charges in order for you to be insured by them.

 

Any insights to this are appreciated.

 

 

 

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On 8.12.2017, 15:20:09, YogaMonkey said:

Hi @john g. 4000 euros is not cheap. So, in a situation like that, is that person now on the radar and its officially known that they must have to pay the €4000 euros, or is there a way for them to get out of that by one of the following:

1, Just go with another public insurer, e.g. AOK, and tell them they just arrived, hoping they don't check the Meldebestätigung;

2, Using a strategy of getting insured with international insurance, e.g. ALC, and then listing ALC as the 'last insurer' when signing back on to compulsory health insurance;

3, Playing the deregister/re-register game and then presenting the new Meldebastätigung to a new insurer;

4, Presenting proof of ongoing NHS insurance - for instance an EHIC card, a letter form GP confirming registration until recently ,or the elusive E104 form - and then just claiming you are freshly arrived in Germany and hoping they just don't check the Meldebestätigung.

 

I had an interesting chat with another insurance broker recently, who suggested that 9 times out of 10 the Krankenkasse people (TK, AOK etc.) don't check the Meldebestätigung anyway, so they just go on what you tell them. He also suggested that there is no international insurance that is actually 'allowed' to replace German public health insurance. If that were the case, then this would mean that the main purpose of the international insurance would be to be able to provide a 'previous insurance' when signing up to a Krankenkasse. If that is accurate, then, in my case, could I not just provide a current EHIC card as proof of previous insurance?

 

In any case, the potential actual employment and obligatory health insurance with Foodora is now ancelled and I am freelancing. I don't intend to ever be 'employed' by a German company, so that may simplify things. I am not prepared to be forced to pay monthly health insurance for periods when I am not in the country. My whole life is about being upwardly mobile and being able to move between countries as and when I choose. Germany seems, sadly, to be a bad choice for me. Britain is much simpler for this kind of thing, but who knows how Brexit will change that!

 

Thanks for all the great insights!

Good evening, YogaMonkey!

I was unfortunately incommunicado from yesterday afternoon till sometime this morning...technical issues...

1. Someone would have to be lucky to get away with that

2.Yes, ok, if moving forward and later becoming an employee but not to sort out an existing backpayment issue. Someone posted on here a few months ago that they´s been written to 5 years later re a backpayment...

3. Maybe but this could still go wrong...someone has you on their records somewhere...

4. Can work..but the E104 form no longer exists in the UK and the UK won´t issue you proof of insurance..that´s up to the German insurance company to get the proof

 

I don´t know how often insurers check the Anmeldung..in my experience, especially with TK, always...

No one I know now switches a client from German public OR private insurance anymore...doesn´t work. I once had a 4 or 5 month to and fro to get a client out of a big German private insurer and into international insurance. BaFin helped out and even sent me a copy of a grovelling letter from high up at a German private insurer (who had their own lawyer and who was arrogant and " kaltschnäuzig "  to me on the phone ) confirming " of course the client can leave us and sign up at international insurer bla bla." It was a pyhrric victory for me (though I enjoyed the outcome ) because it took a lot of time and I took no fees and it was stressful.

 

I can´t go through that again.

Your last point: usually, a copy of the EHIC card is not enough..it doesn´t say where you are currently living or since when....

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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