German/American Dual National Looking to Relocate from USA to Ffm.

73 posts in this topic

On ‎11‎/‎18‎/‎2017‎ ‎11‎:‎58‎:‎17‎, john g. said:

Coming as a " returnee " doesn´t seem to further complicate matters! You have  a unique opportunity to get into German public health insurance with no medical exclusions! You wrote earlier you expect to have to have private insurance and that you some pre-existing medical condtions!

The average 60 year old American-only citizen doesn´t have that window of opportunity!

 

That was my point: more choices = more potential missteps = further complications.  Be that as it may.  This is (very good) news to me.  I would welcome the opportunity to further discuss the matter via PMs (unless you think it would be more useful to do so publicly), and I am not averse to engaging a professional in his/her professional capacity--be it you or anyone else--to ensure the protection of my rights in this or any other regard in connection with my contemplated relocation.

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20 hours ago, john g. said:

:P I don´t have any shiilings these days, fraufruit!

 

Perhaps it was a different kind of shilling...? ;) :D

 

shill

 

[shil] Slang.

 

...

 

verb (used with object)

4. to advertise or promote (a product) as or in the manner of a huckster; hustle:

He was hired to shill a new TV show.

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:D I know, wmlgage..thank you! I was only joking!! Feel free to contact me re public health insurance if you wish. I can´t help in the other areas.

 

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Maybe I should come at the question from a slightly different angle.  My understanding of real estate transactions is exclusively "American," insofar as my limited experience has been exclusively in this country.  And by "limited," I mean one transaction wherein I was a party to the sale of real estate, i.e., the sale of my parents' home in Pennsylvania following the death of my father when ownership of the property passed to me as a testamentary inheritance.  In that case, of course, I was the seller, not the buyer; so my experience with buying real estate anywhere is non-existent.  My father resided in the family manse in Pennsylvania, whereas I have lived in New Mexico since late 1993, so the entire transaction was conducted remotely on my part.  I engaged a local realtor in Pennsylvania to pursue the sale and represent my interests therein.  Potential buyers had their own realtor-representative(s), and, other than personally viewing/inspecting the property, they could just as easily have conducted the transaction from a distance as well.  I cannot imagine that such a transaction, where both parties engage with one another through legal representatives, would be unheard of in Germany.  So maybe my only problem here is to find a realtor/representative willing to act on my behalf (for appropriate recompense, of course!)?  (I did email one firm represented online to be experienced/expert in real estate matters ["Immobilienrecht"], and while their response was in the negative, it was nonetheless encouraging because the only reason my request for representation was declined was a stated inability to take on new business in the circumstances.)  Thoughts?  Advice?  Referral(s)?

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It exists: http://hildebrandt-maeder.de/sites/Immobilienrecht.php?pageid=17

However, nobody in his senses would buy a property that way.

 

You should under no circumstances buy a property you haven't seen, by giving power of attorney to somebody you don't know.

That's the easiest way to:

  • worst case: being scammed and losing all your money
  • best case: buying a dud apartment with noisy neighbours and tens of thousands of € of already decided renovation costs for the house that you will then have to pay (these Sonderumlagen are decided on by the owners with a simply majority, and many apartment owners then sell quickly before they have to pay for them, thereby sticking the next owner with these costs). 

If you do choose to go that way, please don't come back here on Toytown to complain afterwards, unless you can cope with a "We told you so!".

CamperMan bought a house at a distance, and it turned into a saga, please read his threads: https://www.google.de/search?q=camperman+site%3Atoytowngermany.com

 

Please also read:

 

 

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I just received a notice from the Techniker Krankenkasse (TK), pursuant to an application I made on December 20th, stating that, "An admission as part of the general compulsory insurance with the Techniker health insurance is possible in your case."  Many thanks to @johng. for his kind referral!  This is a crucial step forward.

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Hi wmlgage! Everyone on this forum already gave you great information! I also agree on the statements that no one will rent anything to you if you are not physically in Germany. I moved to Germany in 2011 and speak from my own experience. I don't know what your total income other then your ssa benefits are, but if in fact you have 1200 dollars/euros a month, it will not be enough for you to live in Frankfurt or any other city in Germany. If you don't rely on transport/commuting and having to go to work you can find places in villages close to cities where you pay 350-500 Euros or approx. 600 Euros for a small house. If you have to work though you have to in most cases spend additional 200 Euros for public transport or car associated expenses, so that eats up additional funds. It is in general for a lot of people now difficult to afford housing here in Germany when they are alone and they have no partner or roommate to split the costs. Anyways, if you have questions about anything, feel free to private message me. Things work a whole lot different here then in the US, I lived there half of my life and it is a huge adjustment on my part to immigrate and handle all the german ways, and I have been here 6 years now. Regarding purchasing an apartment/house in Germany at age 60: I don't know a lot about the requirements purchasing propetty in Germany, but heard of a lot of younger people stating that they need to get a bank loan to build or buy before they turn a certain age, because the bank will not give any loans to older applicants. Maybe someone else can chime in on that one! Sending best wishes for a healthy and happy 2018!

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13 hours ago, germanyherewecome said:

the bank will not give any loans to older applicants.

You might try to find someone who provides "Eigentümerfinanzierung", i. e. someone who accepts that you will only pay part of the purchase price in cash and the remainder in installments as you´d usually pay to a bank for a mortgage. Or purchase "auf Leibrentenbasis" i. e. you agree to pay the seller a lifelong pension. If he get´s 100 yo you´ll have paid too much, if he dies the following day you´ll have made the bargain of your life.

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@jeba Do you know of any instances where such an arrangement has been made? I’d think it’d be next to impossible to find a seller who would agree to something like that. I certainly wouldn’t.

 

Although the older older one is, the harder it gets to get a mortgage; it also makes more sense to rent rather than buy in advanced years. It’s cheaper to pay rent for 10 or even 20 years, than to buy a property that can only be used for that long and that you cannot take with you when you die. 

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I would expect to pay cash for any apartment I may be able to buy, so there is no issue vis-a-vis getting a mortgage. As for the question of renting vs. buying, I think it's more a question of preference or comfort than money. After he retired and moved to New Mexico, my late husband chose to buy -- first a condominium, and then a house (where I now reside) -- rather than rent, which he'd been doing all his life up to that point in time. He was older then than I am now, and he still was able to get a mortgage loan. I also have a friend in Germany who just this year purchased a two-room apartment after years of paying rent, and he's just three years younger than I. For my part, I guess I just feel more comfortable owning rather than renting. In the end, we take nothing with us when we die, but if we die owning property, at least then we'd have something to leave our heirs/beneficiaries.

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so, if I'm not mistaken, you're still concerned about finding a temporary place to live whilst sorting out/finding a permanent place? it is possible to simply stay at an extended stay hotel, fill out a form (yes, always with the forms :) ) whereby the hotel confirms you're a guest there until (x) day and will allow you to register here in Germany, get a bank account, handy, etc...

 

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I have finally determined that one more short-term, round-trip foray into Germany will likely be required as a first step in this process. At the moment, I am looking at long-term rentals with Airbnb, as well as one particular hotel I found that offers what seems to me to be an affordable monthly rate. I would use that as a base from which to look for a short-term rental (up to one year) that I could then use as a legal address while looking for more permanent digs. I would then return to the States, sell the house and wrap any remaining loose ends, and then return to Germany for good.  This is the first I've heard about using a hotel as a legal address... I'm not entirely sure that that would be feasible, but I'm open to investigating all options... Is there a way to find such hotels? (The one I have discovered I found completely serendipitously.)

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9 hours ago, Smaug said:

@jeba Do you know of any instances where such an arrangement has been made? I’d think it’d be next to impossible to find a seller who would agree to something like that. I certainly wouldn’t.

I´ve done it myself (but only for a fraction of the purchase price). I´m also considering buying the usufruct of the place I´m currently renting (for an upfront lump sum payment). I´d also be happy to consider selling my own property in Germany that way once my son won´t be living there anymore (once he´ll be finished studying). Offering it might make it more easy to find a buyer.

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@PandaMunich, having reviewed the earlier thread you referenced, I am now even better informed. At the moment, the hotel is my "Plan B," with Airbnb being my primary focus. I'd be willing to pay a bit more for the comfort and other advantages inherent in staying with a resident as opposed to hotelier. Receiving mail won't be an issue, and the duration of my anticipated stay would be at least four weeks (or a calendar month). I wasn't planning to register with the Bürgeramt unless I actually found a place to rent, but since that's the whole purpose of the trip, knowing what I need to do in that event is immensely helpful.

 

As to the rest, there's nothing on TripAdviser relating to the hotel I have in mind (I'm deliberately not identifying it), but I have read some reviews on other sites from previous guests, both recent and from years past, and it's a mixed bag. Regardless, I'm not easily discouraged by others' negative opinions. I tend to go for cheap when I travel (Motel 6, e.g.). I just need a place where I can keep my stuff and lay my head on a very short-term basis. Short of a bedbug, rodent or other critter infestation, I'm not very picky.

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Hallo zusammen!

 

Well, everything's gone pretty much according to plan. While spending the month of April in Frankfurt, staying in an Airbnb room in Preungesheim, I found a room to rent within the first two weeks. Upon my return to the States on May 1, scheduled an estate sale and put the house on the market immediately thereafter. Returned to Frankfurt with my "senior" cat on June 23. Now I'm on track to close on the house by the end of July. Information and advice received here was extremely helpful, and I just wanted to say "Thank you."

 

William Gage

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On 7/3/2018, 7:19:01, wmlgage said:

 

Well, everything's gone pretty much according to plan. 

We are in the midst of pursuing the "right of returnee" option as well. Very excited for your success in all of these endeavors. 😃

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Just to add.  I moved to Germany when I was 58.  I was absolutely not able to get on the public health insurance (we tried everything, even filing an official appeal) even though my wife is German and is on it.  I was told that I was too old and I never paid in, so my only option was to get private insurance.  It should also be noted that private insurance after the age of 60 will be very expensive.

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