German/American Dual National Looking to Relocate from USA to Ffm.

74 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, wmlgage said:

 

That is, in fact, my expectation, i.e., using my remaining assets to supplement my limited income in order to buy whatever is required to live day to day over and above such things as food, shelter (Nebenkosten u. Miete [oder Hausgeld]), and other "necessities" (such as insurance). (I know, under the law, health insurance could be characterized as a "necessity," but not so necessary as food or shelter.) The only thing I can count on going forward is my Social Security benefits; my assets are finite, and will ultimately be depleted, more or less quickly depending on how much such additional "necessary" expenses prove to be. Not being able to determine ahead of time what private insurance would cost me--or whether, in fact, I could actually obtain such coverage--is a distinct hindrance to any number-crunching, however. In any event, finding a place to live, whether short- or long-term, is my principle focus at the moment, because, until then, everything else is purely academic.

Not just "could be necessity under law", but a legal obligation. Health care coverage is as essential as food and shelter as

an immigrant to Germany or any country. Or are you expecting any health  needs to be covered or free,  though you may be thinking of a travel insurance to cover you until you  sort out German coverage.?

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't read every word here but my unasked for advise would be to sit down with a reputable finance adviser and let her/him crunch all the numbers and tell you how much money you will have to spend each month to cover all of your expenses and then go from there. MIne was conservative and estimated that I will live to 90 which is highly unlikely and I gave her conservative estimates on weekly, monthly and annual costs. My situation changed a bit this year so she did a recalculation. It is comforting to know how much/little I can afford to spend on a monthly/yearly basis.

 

That may determine where you can afford to live.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, RedMidge said:

Not just "could be necessity under law", but a legal obligation. Health care coverage is as essential as food and shelter as

an immigrant to Germany or any country. Or are you expecting any health  needs to be covered or free,  though you may be thinking of a travel insurance to cover you until you  sort out German coverage.?

 

I fully intend to meet each and every legal obligation that living in Germany may entail.

 

(I would not be coming as an "immigrant," however; rather, as a "returnee," which seems to further complicate matters.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

I haven't read every word here but my unasked for advise would be to sit down with a reputable finance adviser and let her/him crunch all the numbers and tell you how much money you will have to spend each month to cover all of your expenses and then go from there. MIne was conservative and estimated that I will live to 90 which is highly unlikely and I gave her conservative estimates on weekly, monthly and annual costs. My situation changed a bit this year so she did a recalculation. It is comforting to know how much/little I can afford to spend on a monthly/yearly basis.

 

That may determine where you can afford to live.

 

I do not consider any advice offered here by anyone as "unasked for"; it is, in fact, "asked for" by definition. That said, I thank you for your two cents, so to speak :D. I am certainly leaning in the direction of seeking professional advice/assistance with regard to all matters involved in this endeavor, and would gladly accept any referrals, particularly as it relates to the primary topic of this thread. The sooner I can establish legal residency, the sooner I can address all these ancillary matters.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, wmlgage said:

 

I fully intend to meet each and every legal obligation that living in Germany may entail.

 

(I would not be coming as an "immigrant," however; rather, as a "returnee," which seems to further complicate matters.)

Coming as a " returnee " doesn´t seem to further complicate matters! You have  a unique opportunity to get into German public health insurance with no medical exclusions! You wrote earlier you expect to have to have private insurance and that you some pre-existing medical condtions!

The average 60 year old American-only citizen doesn´t have that window of opportunity!

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, jeba said:

Given that you´re looking for (cheap) short term accommodation you might want to consider being a housesitter. You might even be paid for it. Fyi: http://haushueter.org/

 

I appreciate the input, but, unfortunately, it misses the point. Of course, I am looking for inexpensive ("günstig") and short-term (< 1 year), but the key concept here is "residence"--i.e., an address that I could use for all intents and purposes, such as setting up a mobile phone account, or registering with the Bürgeramt/Meldeamt, etc. This would exclude, I believe, all "transient" living arrangements, such as (long-term) hotel rooms, Airbnb rooms/apartments, etc. I would need a lease or sub-lease agreement.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On November 18, 2017 at 11:03:27 AM, wmlgage said:

 

That is, in fact, my expectation, i.e., using my remaining assets to supplement my limited income in order to buy whatever is required to live day to day over and above such things as food, shelter (Nebenkosten u. Miete [oder Hausgeld]), and other "necessities" (such as insurance). (I know, under the law, health insurance could be characterized as a "necessity," but not so necessary as food or shelter.) The only thing I can count on going forward is my Social Security benefits; my assets are finite, and will ultimately be depleted, more or less quickly depending on how much such additional "necessary" expenses prove to be. Not being able to determine ahead of time what private insurance would cost me--or whether, in fact, I could actually obtain such coverage--is a distinct hindrance to any number-crunching, however. In any event, finding a place to live, whether short- or long-term, is my principle focus at the moment, because, until then, everything else is purely academic.

 

We used a holiday flat, arranged  discount with owner for 4 months. Used it for Anmeldung, Krankenkasse, mobile phone, bank account. Insurance etc. Then, when we found a place- address changes easy, and set up post forwarding with Deutsche Post.

So much is available to do on-line. In fact, I am amazed how easy life can be in these times!

(Anyone else remember having to book an international call with operator??)

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

Then look in the "Wohnen auf Zeit" section on Immscout24.de: https://www.immobilienscout24.de/wohnen/wohnen-auf-zeit.html

 

I'm already there. But that brings me back to my initial posting regarding property owners'/landlords' apparent preference for commuter-renters (some even state in the listing, "Nur für Wochenendheimfahrer" (in italics or all-caps), or other words to that exclusionary effect). Frustrating doesn't begin to describe it. (Other problems with the site include an apparent "bug," whereby I get listings for properties which have a listed daily rental price that is below my monthly threshold, but which would be way out of my budget when calculated on a monthly basis. Also, there are the listings where the Kaltmiete is within my budget, but it gets out of range when the Nebenkosten are added.) I did once get what appeared to be a positive response to an inquiry, but that turned out to be a fraudulent listing, which I duly reported to the website.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would recommend first booking for a week or two through AirBnB and once you are here look for a suitable sublet for a few months.

 

How much is your monthly budget For accommodation?

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, wmlgage said:

Frustrating doesn't begin to describe it.

 

Sorry, but if that already frustrates you, you need to up your tolerance to frustration, since life in Germany holds much more capacity for frustration...

 

The problem is that you're not already here.

German landlords expect the would-be renter to call them, and to then appear in person to see whether you look trustworthy, i.e. like the kind of person who will always pay his rent on time, and to inspect all your financial documents (in your case, the Rentenbescheid, i.e. the official piece of paper issued by whoever pays your pension stating how high your pension is) and any rental references (= letters from your past landlords giving you a clean bill of health, i.e. you always paid on time, you didn't trash the place) you may have.

 

If you remember, I told you a few posts back that being a landlord in Germany is a risky business since they cannot just throw out a tenant even if the tenant stops paying (the eviction process takes years and costs north of 10,000€).

So they try to get it right from the start by being very picky in whom they rent to.

 

You have no chance of renting while still being in the US, I suggest you take @RedMidge's advice and simply rent a Ferienwohnung (= holiday rental) since these landlords are used to tourists from other countries, and only start looking for a more permanent rental flat or a flat to buy once you're in Germany.

 

Look for a Ferienwohnung (holiday rental) here: 

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And I still think you need to get with a financial adviser in the U.S. and figure out how much you can spend each month/year. If you don't do that, you won't know where you can afford to live which includes rent, insurances, etc.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, wmlgage said:

I appreciate the input, but, unfortunately, it misses the point. Of course, I am looking for inexpensive ("günstig") and short-term (< 1 year), but the key concept here is "residence"--i.e., an address that I could use for all intents and purposes, such as setting up a mobile phone account, or registering with the Bürgeramt/Meldeamt, etc. This would exclude, I believe, all "transient" living arrangements, such as (long-term) hotel rooms, Airbnb rooms/apartments, etc. I would need a lease or sub-lease agreement.

 

no it's not that hard.

 

In general, you can claim any address as your starting residence.  It does not have to be long term.  Once you are registered at a given address, you will have your anmeldung paperwork, which is what you need to get a bank account or what have you.    

 

If you have a short term rental, you sure as heck should have a contract to show for it.  Even via air-bnb.

 

you can search the board for topics on anmeldung.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

German landlords expect the would-be renter to call them, and to then appear in person to see whether you look trustworthy, i.e. like the kind of person who will always pay his rent on time, and to inspect all your financial documents (in your case, the Rentenbescheid, i.e. the official piece of paper issued by whoever pays your pension stating how high your pension is) and any rental references (= letters from your past landlords giving you a clean bill of health, i.e. you always paid on time, you didn't trash the place) you may have.

 

A statement of benefits from the U.S. SSA is easily obtainable online. (It remains to be seen how a German landlord would receive such a document.) As for rental references, I haven't lived in rented living quarters for more than 20 years now. I own my home, free and clear.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We also had owned, and not rented for years. Use common sense- what would you want to see as a landlord?

We showed copies of ownership of properties and mortgage statement. Also pension statements.

As noted- landlords want to meet prospective tenants.

You have not said what your budget is, but all rentals come with the split costs of rent and nebenkosten. At the end of the  year, you may have to pay more or get a refund from these costs.

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, fraufruit said:

And I still think you need to get with a financial adviser in the U.S. and figure out how much you can spend each month/year. If you don't do that, you won't know where you can afford to live which includes rent, insurances, etc.

:PDon´t you mean a financial adviser in Germany?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, RedMidge said:

 

You have not said what your budget is, but all rentals come with the split costs of rent and nebenkosten. At the end of the  year, you may have to pay more or get a refund from these costs.

 

I fear there will be more frustration for wmlgage, considering the 1/3 rule of thumb and the landlords disregard of fundings the budget is somewhere slightly over 400€ (with 40%) or even less (with 30%). Not much for Frankfurt. 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, john g. said:

Don´t you mean a financial adviser in Germany?

 

I live in Germany but I needed my advice from the U.S. where my money is.

 

Stop shilling. :lol:

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now