Database recommendation

21 posts in this topic

Hi wise people,

Has anyone got a recommendation for a database (could be cloud based) for itemising company hardware? More specifically for a construction company to itemise it's kit (from Bohrhammers to Baggers etc...)

The company is open to a custom type database that could be specifically designed and tailored for their needs.

What are the free and paid for alternatives?

Would anyone be interested in a job designing something and putting it together?

 

Look forward to replies.

 

TG.

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This is a difficult question, most importantly it should fit in with the other tech you have, otherwise it will turn into a unsupportable millstone around your neck.  If you are a small business doing everything in MS office then please choose something similar like MS-SQL, you dont want to be beholden to a student who built something in whatever exotic tech and then leaves.

 

Im guessing you want an online database with decent security (something role based), a web interface, search etc maybe integration with other systems (the purchasing system should maybe add items?).  Maybe the accounts guys want access so they can get up to date values of the items you own?  Other reporting?

 

Assuming this is a mid-largish company with money to spend Id suggest something like LAMP as a starting point.  Could obviously be done with java/oracle/tomcat or any number of other alternatives.  One major advantage of LAMP is that there are millions of people who can do it and more importantly you should be able to find people who can help in the future when you need changes/fixes/etc.

 

If you have IBM gear then yes as Gwaptiva says DB2 is the obvious choice.

 

Im sure people like SAP have off the shelf solutions for this kind of thing, and Oracle and friends would love to talk to you as well.  Have you thought about 

http://www.jonasconstruction.com/features/construction-inventory-management/ 

http://toolhound.com/industries/construction/ etc?

 

But on the other hand maybe all you really need is MS-access which at least has a kind of path to SQL-Server if you want a "real" database later.  And it is more or less free in comparison to the investments you would  be making for any of the others. 

 

 

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I think that when the OP says "DB" he does not mean just the DB engine, I think he is expecting some sort of small Inventory solution. Correct me if I am wrong.

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Just now, Krieg said:

I think that when the OP says "DB" he does not mean just the DB engine, I think he is expecting some sort of small Inventory solution. Correct me if I am wrong.

Would be my guess as well.

Is there actually a free solution for what the OP is looking for?

Even if they find a free DB/software offer, it will still have costs unless their business model/setup fits really well with the default out of the box setup of the software.

Looking further, upgrades could still cause costs if the software changes. Granted, they may not be software costs, but having to redesign process es etc can also be costly.
As also said above, if the software has to be customised,then this brings sustainability in to the question, who makes the changes, what happens when the software changes and everything has to be re-done.

Can't really say much more without knowing exactly what the OP is looking for.

 

 

 

 

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Some questions:

 

1. How many users

2. How many concurrent users

3. How much data

4. How many changes per workday as a percentage

5. Do you have a tech support staff

6. Can you afford to lose data changes

 

If you have a few users and they are not using the DB concurrently, and the database is small with few changes which can be re-entered,  then use MS Access.  

 

Otherwise use something that fits with the rest of your infrastructure.

 

Good luck

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@zwiebelfisch The Community Edition is freely available and can be run (as far as I have been able to determine from the woolly IBM website and language - IANAIPL) free of charge. It runs on pretty much any hardware and operating system, including common-or-garden PCs with Windows or Linux.

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Sure. But i wouldnt recommended db2 to anyone that isnt an ibm place.  Not that its a bad database, it isnt. 

But why db2 when you could just as well use postgresql mysql or any others? 

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20 hours ago, SA618 said:

Some questions:

 

1. How many users

2. How many concurrent users

3. How much data

4. How many changes per workday as a percentage

5. Do you have a tech support staff

6. Can you afford to lose data changes

 

If you have a few users and they are not using the DB concurrently, and the database is small with few changes which can be re-entered,  then use MS Access.  

 

Otherwise use something that fits with the rest of your infrastructure.

 

Good luck

 

 

1. How many users - 1,000

2. How many concurrent users circa 300

3. How much data - 1TB should do it - with pictures  & documentation

4. How many changes per workday as a percentage - not sure how to calculate this but it would not change that much on a day to day basis - lets say 15%

Tracking tools when they need to be sent from one site to another or when they need to be sent to a testing company for annual check.

 

5. Do you have a tech support staff - Yes

6. Can you afford to lose data changes - Not really, would like to avoid if at all possible.

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33 minutes ago, LostInEurope01 said:

Off the top of my head the more well known "free" RDMS:

MySQL (open source)

PostgreSQL (open source)

DB2 (free to use AFAIK)

... uno momento ...

Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_database_management_system

 

For the record, are you looking for the full package (User Application + RDBMS + Schema) or just a DB? 

 

The full monty...

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20 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

Sure. But i wouldnt recommended db2 to anyone that isnt an ibm place.  Not that its a bad database, it isnt. 

But why db2 when you could just as well use postgresql mysql or any others? 

 

Because the more I work with mysql, the more it starts being an annoying heap 'o shite. But that's maybe mainly because my corporate customers that use it, use it because they think they can save money using it, meaning there's no proper DBA support... and then they moan at us for having a slow system

 

 

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3 hours ago, TallGuy said:

1. How many users - 1,000

2. How many concurrent users circa 300

3. How much data - 1TB should do it - with pictures  & documentation

4. How many changes per workday as a percentage - not sure how to calculate this but it would not change that much on a day to day basis - lets say 15%

Tracking tools when they need to be sent from one site to another or when they need to be sent to a testing company for annual check.

 

5. Do you have a tech support staff - Yes

6. Can you afford to lose data changes - Not really, would like to avoid if at all possible.

 

It is not a desktop system and it sounds like you definitely cannot afford to lose data.   I would not go with a cheap or free solution.   There are many possibilities.     

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3 minutes ago, SA618 said:

 

It is not a desktop system and it sounds like you definitely cannot afford to lose data.   I would not go with a cheap or free solution.   There are many possibilities.     

 

I'm not specifically looking for cheap or free. I am open to offers and suggestions of what is available (preferably in German) Zwiebelfisch had a couple of suggestions but it looks like they are based in the US.

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Most of the large IT vendors are American, but they have offices in Germany.  

 

Oracle, DB2, MySQL (with support) + a commonly used app server + standard tools like java should work.     If you have Software Developers at your company, consult with them.   If you choose a development tool that is new to them, then you will get stuck hiring contractors and post implementation support might not be as easy.

 

If you don't have a Data Center and you don't want to hire System Administrators, Application Engineers and Database Administrators,  Amazon or another hosting service might be a good way to go.    If those people are already in place then it would be worthwhile to consult with them. 

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Obviously, data centers from American companies are usually not based in Germany or the EU and this might prevent their use for data storage (I know it does in my company)

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