Tax deduction from buying laptop for work

15 posts in this topic

Hi. I'm thinking about buying a new laptop for work. I've been reading around here and elsewhere about claiming a tax deduction from that. From what I gather, there are three important points:
1. It is for work.

2. Require for the job.

3. Employer doesn't provide it

 

So here is my situation/question for each point
1. This laptop will be almost always for work. I have a desktop for private use at home and the laptop will be used at my office most of the time. The biggest exception is when I travel, where I'll also use it in my private time. Is this still qualify as "for work"?

2. This is pretty easy I think. My job certainly needs it.

3. This one is tricky. The thing is my department actually give me three options: a desktop, a standard Dell laptop, or a MacBook Air. However, none of those really satisfy my need. And since I will be using this for most of my working time, I'd like to have something I'm happy with. The question is, does this fact disqualify me from claiming the tax deduction from buying my own laptop?

 

Thank you in advance.

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4 hours ago, Hyper said:

3. This one is tricky. The thing is my department actually give me three options: a desktop, a standard Dell laptop, or a MacBook Air. However, none of those really satisfy my need. And since I will be using this for most of my working time, I'd like to have something I'm happy with. The question is, does this fact disqualify me from claiming the tax deduction from buying my own laptop?

 

Yes, sorry.

You don't get to pick and choose and be happy: you're supposed to make do with the laptop/PC your employer provides you with.

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It seems to me that you need to discuss this with your employer! They have given you options of windows or mac; desktop or laptop - They seem like they are quite accommodating but if you need a different machine to carry out your work then you'll need to discuss this with them. If the required machine costs 100 EUR more, but will save you an hours work per week I am sure it would not be a difficult argument to win...

If the laptop will be used at the office, the company might have restrictions on what can access the network. Where I work only company provided equipment can use the network.

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Thank you both for your reply. Sounds like I'm out of luck :(

Indeed, they are quite accommodating, but it is still not quite satisfy my "need". Let me clarify a bit: my work is basically doing research with a lot of data analysis included. I want a fairly powerful system, but also something that I can write on so I can take notes, annotate paper, etc. So I'd like something like a Surface. I don't "need" those features, but I think you can imagine that it'll be very useful for research. It is a set department rule to only have those three options, so I decided to buy my own. I just realized yesterday that maybe I can use tax deduction to help a bit. Looks like I was wrong then...

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You can put it down on your tax, but it might get rejected - however if you don't ask you defiantly won't get.

 

It is allowed to put books, German courses, etc. on your tax as these are things make you a better person. Other expenses related to work (suits, dry cleaning costs) can also be tax deductible. In your case wanting a surface so you can take notes will probably get rejected.

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10 minutes ago, donaby said:

You can put it down on your tax, but it might get rejected - however if you don't ask you defiantly won't get.

 

It is allowed to put books, German courses, etc. on your tax as these are things make you a better person. Other expenses related to work (suits, dry cleaning costs) can also be tax deductible. In your case wanting a surface so you can take notes will probably get rejected.

 

Thanks for the advice. One quick question, if I want to try put it down, which address should I put in my invoice? My office, or my home address?

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5 minutes ago, Hyper said:

 

 

Thanks for the advice. One quick question, if I want to try put it down, which address should I put in my invoice? My office, or my home address?

 

It would be a private expense.

By making an illegitimate claim you are stealing. There is a lot of tax avoidance going on, I just want to say that I don't condone your behaviour.

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1 minute ago, donaby said:

By making an illegitimate claim you are stealing. There is a lot of tax avoidance going on,

 

Tax avoidance is pefectly legal. Tax Evasion is a whole other story however

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3 minutes ago, donaby said:

 

It would be a private expense.

By making an illegitimate claim you are stealing. There is a lot of tax avoidance going on, I just want to say that I don't condone your behaviour.

I am not sure how you come to a conclusion that I am trying to do something illegal. As you said, if I don't ask, I definitely don't get the deduction. So, I simply want to say the truth, both here and will be in the tax form. If I don't get the deduction, it's ok. If I do, great!

 

2 minutes ago, LeCheese said:

 

Tax avoidance is pefectly legal. Tax Evasion is a whole other story however

I think I tried to be clear that I simply want to use the deduction if I'm qualified to. In another word, I just don't want to overpay my tax.

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4 minutes ago, Hyper said:

I think I tried to be clear that I simply want to use the deduction if I'm qualified to. In another word, I just don't want to overpay my tax.

 

Indeed, you were perfectly clear. I am just pointing out that tax avoidance is legal. That is why steurberaters exist.

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I think that we are going off at a tangent here.

 

I was just noting that this is a grey area...

Avoiding paying tax on childcare so that you are able to work - legitimate.

Avoiding paying tax on a computer because you prefer it to the one you have been provided with -> This could be considered evasion.

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1 hour ago, donaby said:

Other expenses related to work (suits, dry cleaning costs) can also be tax deductible.

 

Nope.

Clothing you can also wear privately is never tax-deductible, and neither are its cleaning costs.

 

If you were a butcher who needed a white apron and white wellingtons, those would be deductible, and their cleaning, too, since you wouldn't be caught dead in those in your free time.

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5 hours ago, donaby said:

It is allowed to put books, German courses, etc. on your tax as these are things make you a better person. 

I was under the impression that German courses are never deductible, but that books to learn skills/about topics related to work (at least for self-employed people) are.

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I understood the whole discussion, my question is, how much I will get back from tax if I buy a laptop of cost 1500 Euros ?

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