As EU citizen can I be a freelancer and have a mini-job?

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I want to start working as a freelance English teacher in Berlin. Whilst I'm waiting for work to pick up can I do a mini-job? Would I just add the income to my tax return at the end of the year? I have registered and I'm in the process of applying for a freelance tax number.

 

Also, I've just filled in an E101 from the UK to have my health insurance covered for one year. Is my health insurance still valid if I do 'employed' work as well as self-employed.

 

Thanks for your help. I'm new to the German system!

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Yes, go ahead.

A mini job does not come with health insurance, so it does not affect the health insurance situation at all.

Nor is it mentioned in a tax return, in fact the employer pays all the income tax for you in a mini job.

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Are you self-employed in the UK, catmancan? I think the E101 form is for self-employed moving to Germany to continue as self-employed.

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-insurance-application-for-form-e101-if-self-employed-in-european-economic-area-ca3837

 

:rolleyes:Plus: incidentally, I got off my sick bed to post a thread which may or may not be useful for you ( in case you take up a non-minijob as an employee ):

 

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/374153-freelance-and-employedpublic-health-insurance-implications/#comment-3614358

 

Disclaimer: I´m an independent insurance broker and an official advertiser on Toytown.

 

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Hi John! Thanks for replying, from your sickbed no less :( hope you're feeling better soon! I read your post. Wowzers, what a minefield! It's cleared a lot of things up.

 

I am self employed in the UK although not as an English Teacher. Do you know if the E101 will cover me if I do freelancing and have a mini-job? If not it might be advisable for me to only look for freelancing work as health insurance is so expensive! God bless the NHS. Or alternatively look for full-time work, although I can't speak German very well yet and I've looked high and low for English Teaching jobs to no avail.

 

Thanks again for your help :)

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Hi PandaMunich. Thanks for replying. Why wouldn't you you write your earnings from a mini-job in your tax return? Doesn't it contribute to your total income? I also thought that neither you or your employer paid any income tax on a mini-job. I thought that's why they were so popular with employers - cheap labour!

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Hi PandaMunich. Thanks for replying. Why wouldn't you you write your earnings from a mini-job in your tax return? Doesn't it contribute to your total income? I also thought that neither you or your employer paid any income tax on a mini-job. I thought that's why they were so popular with employers - cheap labour!

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Hello again, catmancan! (listening to Indian mantras and relaxing.)...

 

The mini-job is irrelevant for health insurance issues in Germany. Just forget that.

I am not sure but I don´t think your self-.employment as a non-English teacher in the UK will be covered by the E101 as an English teacher. I think ( but not sure ) it has to be job-relevant. 

Freelance health insurance in the public system is expensive..normally, the minimum is over 300 euros a month (but it depends )..prices in Germany in the public health system depend on income and not on health issues, age etc. NO NHS, yep.

Most English teaching jobs in Germany ARE freelance, though. The language schools don´t want the hassle of employing people- that costs them  money if they have to pay a part of your health insurance, pension etc if you are an employee.

 

How to health insure yourself? It depends greatly on how long you plan to stay in Germany...if very long term, public insurance has its benefits/advantages If short term, eg 1-3 years or whatever, private insurance might be beneficial but it all depends. . 

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30 minutes ago, catmancan said:

I am self employed in the UK although not as an English Teacher. Do you know if the E101 will cover me if I do freelancing

 

The E101 covers you when your 'second' yourself as a freelancer from GB to Germany. I doubt that a change in your profession will be covered. 

 

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and have a mini-job?

 

Forget the mini-job, the mini-job doesn't affect your health insurance at all. 

 

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If not it might be advisable for me to only look for freelancing work as health insurance is so expensive! God bless the NHS. Or alternatively look for full-time work, although I can't speak German very well yet and I've looked high and low for English Teaching jobs to no avail.

 

Sorry, but maybe you rethink your plans of moving to Berlin – the economic black hole of Germany with already too many desperate expats looking for freelance work as English teachers ... 

 

23 minutes ago, catmancan said:

Why wouldn't you you write your earnings from a mini-job in your tax return? 

 

Because it is irrelevant.

 

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Doesn't it contribute to your total income?

 

No.

 

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I also thought that neither you or your employer paid any income tax on a mini-job.

 

The employer has to pay a a flat-rate of 31,29% for health insurance (it comes without health insurance for you anyway), pension, accident insurance, allocations and income tax.

 

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Hi Someonesdaughter. Thanks for replying. Yes I've been wondering that myself about Berlin. I have seen English Teaching jobs advertised in Frankfurt so maybe that's the better option. Probably better for my German learning too! It wouldn't be a career change, it's just that my English Teaching work in England has been employed not self-employed. I'll have to see what they say.

 

So hypothetically if I get granted the E101, I can do both freelancing work and a mini-job and won't need to pay health insurance at all as it will be covered by E101 for one year; and the mini-job has no effect on my tax rate when doing my self assessment at the end of the year. If I am lucky enough to find any work whatsoever! :wacko:

 

If I don't get granted the E101 then full-time employment is my only option because 300€+ before I have any clients will wipe out my savings pretty quickly. Is it true I legally have to have health insurance? Somebody told me it's only that once I've got it I can't not have it, but before I get anything it's fine!

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3 minutes ago, catmancan said:

If I don't get granted the E101 then full-time employment is my only option because 300€+ before I have any clients will wipe out my savings pretty quickly.

 

There is more bad news: As a teacher you have to contribute to the state pension scheme, too. 

 

And, btw, if the minimum contribution for health insurance (actually it's 381,53€ in 2017; only in certain cases of hardship or state sponsored entrepreneurship it can be as little as ca. 250€) will wipe out your savings soon – then how do you plan to pay for accommodation etc.?

 

3 minutes ago, catmancan said:

Is it true I legally have to have health insurance?

 

Yes. Health insurance is obligatory, once you register you have to have it. 

 

 

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I have an income from my business in the UK. It's not much but it covers my rent. I make jewellery and sell it online mostly in the UK and USA. I've got a load of it already made and someone is posting it out for me in England. I've spoken to the UK tax people and they say if it stays on British soil than I pay tax to the UK on my earnings from it.

 

So ultimately I don't really need to earn that much money, just enough to keep me fed and watered. I'm pretty accustomed to living without a lot. But with the health insurance dilemma I need to work full-time just to pay for it! I could live just about with a mini-job, but not when paying health insurance. I am also doing an intensive German language course in the afternoons at the moment, but I think that's a luxury I can't afford right now and it's hard to fit employed work around it. The old catch-22! I'll have to go back to duolingo!

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http://harry.dw.com/landing/en/index.html

 

This will get you German up to B1 or 2, I forget which. It is good, free, and in short chunks which is great for the modern person with no attention span. The character Harry is an irritating git, who starts off rubbish and then suddenly has an epiphany and picks up German more quickly than any real person could, but it is definitely worth doing.

 

If you can land yourself a midi-job, then there is health insurance included and the employer pays half, but it does go on your tax return. Panda will come back on and tell you if that is a plan worth pursuing or just a red herring from me.

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Hi Everyone,

 

Okay, so a tricky situation for me. I'm from the UK and registered here in Berlin last June. I was fully employed and registered in Berlin and got my tax number as an employee. 

 

I then left my job last week. 

 

I wish to set up my own freelancing service, but wondered if the following was possible, or how best to go about this transition, feeling overwhelmed!

 

1. Can I register in the UK as a freelancer and do all my taxes via the UK AND be registered at an address in Berlin? 

 

I'm not sure how the system works, if better to register in Berlin as a freelancer, a link to how to go about this would be amazing!

 

Thanks Everyone,

 

David 

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