Would like to move and work in Germany, particularly in Schleswig-Holstein

56 posts in this topic

Hi, Germany has some beautiful views and it is worth a few years to hang in here and travel Europe. It is hard to jump through all the hoops again. You seem younger so you may have the tolerance to do that. I am in the North. Germans can be more strict and inflexible the farther north you go, so you will have to go to the authorities in your area to get the right facts on transferring your nursing licence.  I read you will need the B2 language proficiency. You might get a nursing assistant job with the A2 level you mentioned. You will still need some training and certification to do even that.  I am a US nurse but not working here. The general incompetence of the medical staff might be the worst part of working here, once you jump through all the hoops. The farther away you are from a University or good private hospital the worse it gets. When you go to the smaller doctors offices don't let those reusable glasses and community bottle of mineral water that needs the lid removed and put back by each patient again and again, while you sit in observation in the waiting room shock you. Hand washing and gloves are optional when giving injections. lol  Scary.. that whole blood born pathogen chapter must not be included in the education process.   They have a very strong hierarchy here among staff. Lots of posturing and self importance. Nursing historically is looked down on.  I know some people like to post stats about how great the medical care is here in Germany etc. It is a political topic especially in America, everyone on the left likes to point to Germany, few have experienced it first hand.  Everyone is covered (Everyone has to  pay in is more like the reality).The fact is the accountability documentation of negative outcomes is suspect or non existent.  I can only go by personal experience of about 35 years of cringe worthy observation.   People are right to point out the issues of moving here. No respect. The pay is way less, your pension will be less. That whole stay at home with your kids while they are young sounds so wonderful, but for women, it is an old age poverty trap. You may get some pension years credit if you are married and he has kids. You need about 20 years in the second half of you work life to qualify for retirement medical benefits. Even then you will still have to pay something for them unless you are at the poverty line and have your twenty years in.  Canada is the better professional choice but you should check out Europe. Be prepared eating out ...Asian food is just horrible here. You will have to cook at home sometimes. lol  Wiki has some info. You will probably have a good chance to work in doctors office, aim for the eye specialist. They always need people to run the patients through their little money making machines. They have to mark up the bill somehow.   They always have a big turnover in the smaller offices. Most are part time jobs. If you have computer or programming skills you may find something in research. This "wiki" bit is regarding UK nurses who want to work in Germany, but the process is the same. " In Germany, all nurses who want to work in their nursing profession have to have their qualification recognized by applying for an "Anerkennung". This is through the official administrative body responsible for licensing health care professionals which varies from state to state. Requirements include: language proficiency of level B2 in German, registration with the Nursing Midwifery Council (NMC), evidence of nursing education (including an academic transcript and degree certificate which may need to be translated into German), evidence of current residence, evidence of allowance to work in the EU, and evidence that your Nursing education meets the "EU Berufsanerkennungsrichtlinie/2005/36/EG" standards. "  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nursing_in_Germany

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On 19/09/2017, 08:02:25, Bogs said:

Greetings!

 

Im 31 years old from the Philippines and currently residing in Alberta Canada. I wish to move and work in Germany. Im a registered Nurse in the Phil. And i tried going online to find out how to get a job and where to start but im overwhelmed with the information im getting from the internet. 

 

I know i have to learn the language so I enrolled and will start classes at the end of the month. I thought trying and looking for a job or an employer will take me few months running and so it will work out with the schooling for language at the same time. 

 

I hope to hear from you guys about what you know that can help in my situation here. Thank you so much and every bit of information you will provide will be much appreciated.

 

Kat

 

As much as it is important to learn the language, I think you should also take some self defence classes before coming over.

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I'll echo others here in saying to try and get your Canadian citizenship before moving to Germany. Do you know what visa you plan on applying for? Since you're 31, you could apply for the Youth Mobility Visa, which would give you a year to see if you and your boyfriend will mesh as well living together as you do long-distance. That way, if you really don't like it here, or it's just not working out job-wise, love-wise, etc. it's only a year. It's a good way to "dip your toe" in the water without screwing yourself completely in either Canada or the Philippines. 

 

If you do come as a Canadian citizen, you're allowed to stay in Germany for three months, and look for a job in those three months, and apply for a visa in country. Now, I don't know very much about nursing in Germany (other people have provided great info from the looks of it) but I do know German work visas aren't exactly the easiest to get. You basically have to prove that your employer needs you because he/she can't find a German or an EU citizen to do the same job. It's extremely hard to prove with lots of paperwork and require a lot of cooperation with your prospective employer. So, if you're serious about working here, I'd start looking around now at jobs, or get your boyfriend to. 

 

And though I don't doubt you and your boyfriend have a good relationship, I gotta agree with everyone else about really thinking about this. I also moved here from Canada not too long ago and though I love my husband dearly, there are many times I wish I hadn't done it, and all the sacrifices I made weigh heavily on me. Fraufruit is right about being upfront with each other about your expectations. 

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2 minutes ago, Arctic Circle said:

I'll echo others here in saying to try and get your Canadian citizenship before moving to Germany.

 

I second that too. And don't tell the Germans that you are Canadian. Just tell them you are Filipino. That way, if you ever decided you want to naturalize German, you won't have to give up your Canadian citizenship.

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7 minutes ago, Smaug said:

 

I second that too. And don't tell the Germans that you are Canadian. Just tell them you are Filipino. That way, if you ever decided you want to naturalize German, you won't have to give up your Canadian citizenship.

though that is kind of tricky as they ask where your were born. And sometimes where your parents were born too.  Is it really a good idea too lie, or are there possible nasty consequences?  Or is t?otally cool and OK  to do this?

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The OP is from the Philippines. I assume she was born there.

 

The only nasty consequence I could think of if she naturalized German and was found out to be secretly Canadian later on is that her German citizenship could be revoked. That's assuming they bother to do that. I'd run the risk, but of course, that would be the OP's decision which would be at least 6 years away assuming she moves to Germany.

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26 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

though that is kind of tricky as they ask where your were born. And sometimes where your parents were born too.  Is it really a good idea too lie, or are there possible nasty consequences?  Or is t?otally cool and OK  to do this?

Well,  they do ask if you hold other citizenships, . So lying is not a good idea.

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4 hours ago, RenegadeFurther said:

 

As much as it is important to learn the language, I think you should also take some self defence classes before coming over.

 

Perhaps she should take a self-defense class before coming to TT because you said yesterday on this thread the German taxpayers will be the losers because it doesn't need more freeloaders to come here.  But then you immediately deleted your post because you weren't brave enough to let it stand. 

 

 

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The op should find work and a visa easily. She needs to learn German, and organise recognition of qualifications. 

Agencies in Canada and UK post ads for German hospitals. 

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It's easy for people to give advice to her not knowing her or her entire situation. Perhaps doing what she feels is best for her considering or not considering the anonymous advice here.

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I think it should stay open so you can spread your infinite narrow minded wisdom about how freeloaders are trying to get to

Germany taking over.  :lol:

 

Always pointing a finger but never taking any responsibility for your own behavior. 

 

#your typical sophomoric behavior

 

 

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I will add a bit about getting expectations clear before you come. One of mine was that he not expect for me to work here. No brainer. I had no idea if I could learn the language enough to work or what kind of job I would be able to get when I would spend a lot of time in the U.S. - especially when my parents got old. I did clarify that I had investments and would continue to invest in order to contribute to the pension. It all worked out well.

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14 hours ago, Smaug said:

 

I second that too. And don't tell the Germans that you are Canadian. Just tell them you are Filipino. That way, if you ever decided you want to naturalize German, you won't have to give up your Canadian citizenship.

 

oof that does not sound like a good idea :)  Kinda sorta full on fraud?

 

my thinking is:  she should get canadian citizenship, I think this would expand her options 

 

Regarding German citizenship, she can take many years to decide if she even wants to do that.  Maybe she never does.  She will be in good shape in Germany with marriage and permanent residence so no pressure on that front.

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She'd also need a visa to come to Germany in the first place as a citizen of the Philippines, whereas she can enter visa-free and later adjust her status as a Canadian.

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