Job rules in Bremen

6 posts in this topic

Hi Good people

I need some information...

I am doing a job (PhD contract) in the university (Bremen). Which is 26.74 hours in a week (66% work time). 

Is it possible for me to work a part time or mini job (450 euro)? Am I allowed to work more? 

Do I need to pay more tax if I do a mini job?

I am not an European Citizen but I have Masters degree from Germany.

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12 minutes ago, Black Panther said:

Is it possible for me to work a part time or mini job (450 euro)? Am I allowed to work more? 

 

What does your permit say?

 

 

 

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If you have a working permit for Germany, you can basicly take a 450 Euro mini job. But you would have to make sure your contract with the uni allows it, too. It could be that they don't since the rest of your working week ought to be dedicated to your studies.

Tax wise it's no problem, the 450 Euro job includes already all taxes.

 

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1 hour ago, Hannoverian said:

If you have a working permit for Germany, you can basicly take a 450 Euro mini job.

 

Not necessarily! If his permit is tied to his job, he needs special permission to start a minijob.

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On 9/17/2017, 2:44:36, engelchen said:

 

 

Not necessarily! If his permit is tied to his job, he needs special permission to start a minijob.

I talked to the HR (Alfred Wegener Institute, Bremerhaven). As a PhD student, I am enrolled in Uni Bremen, but I do research and get salary from Alfred Wegener Institute. The HR people told me to inform them which type of job I am going to do as minijob..No problem with the work permit...Just wanted to be confirmed that do I need to py more tax if I have a 450 euro basis mini job.

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OT - Wegener is one of the heroes of geography, the man who first formulated the theory of continental drift; another is Harley Bretz, who first realized the origin of the Channeled Scablands in Washington State.  In both cases the men were scorned and ridiculed by their peers for many years.  Bretz survived, to be lauded by his peers and awarded the Primrose Medal, American geology's highest honor, at the age of 96.  It was 70 years after he first discussed his theory that the scablands had been created by a series of massive floods, and he said to his son, 'All my enemies are dead, so I have no one to gloat over.'

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