American moving with her EU-citizen boyfriend, advice please!

7 posts in this topic

Hello TTers! I've been lurking around this thread for a while and I think it's about time I ask for some advice/help, even if that means being skewered alive lol.

 

I'm a mid 20's American, still currently in the middle of pursuing a bachelor's in Physics, possibly moving to Berlin with my boyfriend, an Irish citizen with an American Visa. He's an established freelance graphic designer and we've already locked down a sublet for the first three months of our move. Financially we aren't worried about being able to afford to live in Berlin while I secure a job but I'd appreciate any/all advice/help on how to gain a job that could provide me with a letter in order to obtain a residence/work permit. I speak essentially no German (and am currently learning) and I understand what a disadvantage I'm at already. I'd just like any advice on any routes that would allow me to legally stay within the country.

 

Just a little about myself;

 

I've worked as a Paraprofessional with the NYC Department of Education for 3+ years; a job that required me to take several workshops and learn to work with special needs children across a wide spectrum. I've also worked for a nonprofit organization 4+ years that provides young people with employment year round as well as several after-school programs for middle school children. I've been pursuing my bachelor's in Physics in order to hopefully teach high school physics in the future. Is there any hope of turning these job experiences into a vocational qualification (even a partial qualification)?

 

I understand that as an American I need to pass the Vorrangprüfung, I'm taking this very seriously and hoping that there is anything I can do while still in NYC in order to hit the ground running when I reach Berlin.

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I wonder whether a Paraprofessional job qualification would translate into an Erzieher job. In Berlin it seems there is or was an Erzieher shortage. Perhaps someone else knows something more about whether you could get your qualifications recognized to be an Erzieher in a kindergarten, after school program or somewhere else. Of course, jobs would be fewer with not knowing German.

 

I do hope you'll finish your degree. I'd definitely recommend that. Perhaps then in the future you could apply to work at an international school.

 

These are just some ideas. I am sure others will be able to help more.

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I've already begun looking up what an Erzieher is, thank you so much for that bit of information, at the very least it's led to different places with potential positions I can apply to.

 

I also hope to finish my degree though at the moment I'd really like to look into all of my options.

 

Thanks again!

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1 hour ago, Tmndz said:

Is there any hope of turning these job experiences into a vocational qualification (even a partial qualification)?

 

You can have your qualifications evaluated and it is possible that you can do a shortened apprenticeship to become an Erzieher, however, you would require at least B2 German.

 

 

1 hour ago, Tmndz said:

I understand that as an American I need to pass the Vorrangprüfung, I'm taking this very seriously and hoping that there is anything I can do while still in NYC in order to hit the ground running when I reach Berlin.

 

You can try applying at bilingual / English kindergartens. 

 

1 hour ago, Tmndz said:

possibly moving to Berlin with my boyfriend, an Irish citizen with an American Visa. He's an established freelance graphic designer and we've already locked down a sublet for the first three months of our move. Financially we aren't worried about being able to afford to live in Berlin while I secure a job 

 

Have you already looked at the market for freelance graphic designers in Berlin? I would recommend the posts by Limu.

 

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/233635-too-poor-for-health-insurance/

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Thank you for the advice, I'll be sending my CV's to different international/bilingual kitas in Berlin.

 

Having looked at the link you provided, my boyfriend is confident in being able to afford health insurance however he has some questions/concerns, if you could clarify?

 

He owns his own American based company (an S-CORP). He'll be working in Berlin with mostly American clientele (remotely) and wanted to know if the tax laws of one country supersede the other? He wants to know whether he should declare taxes in the United States or Germany. And if he does need to declare taxes with Germany, how would German authorities verify his income? What paperwork would be very important to hold onto (besides invoices and such)? 

 

I also wonder it'd be possible for him to maintain his U.S. green card after registering in Berlin?

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4 hours ago, Tmndz said:

Having looked at the link you provided, my boyfriend is confident in being able to afford health insurance however he has some questions/concerns, if you could clarify?

 

He should make sure that he has sufficient clients willing to work with him remotely; it'll be difficult to find many new ones here.

 

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He owns his own American based company (an S-CORP). He'll be working in Berlin with mostly American clientele (remotely) and wanted to know if the tax laws of one country supersede the other? He wants to know whether he should declare taxes in the United States or Germany.

 

He'll be required to file taxes in both countries.

 

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And if he does need to declare taxes with Germany, how would German authorities verify his income?

 

The Germans and Americans also exchange some info, eventually they'll find out.

 

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What paperwork would be very important to hold onto (besides invoices and such)? 

 

Everything. Read the threads by PandaMunich on filing taxes in Germany. 

 

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I also wonder it'd be possible for him to maintain his U.S. green card after registering in Berlin?

 

He will eventually loose it. He needs to decide whether or not he wants to give up his right to live in the US in order to move to Berlin. He should also look into the financial drawbacks of holding on to a Green Card. As well as if he requires his Green Card yo continue with his corporation. 

 

I think your boyfriend needs to do a lot more reasearch. 

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I can only weigh in on maintaining the Green Card. He can apply for a re-entry permit (https://www.uscis.gov/i-131) which will let him stay out of the country for up to two years without losing her GC. He should continue to file taxes and maintain is financial and other footholds in the US, if possible (bank accounts, credit cards, driver's license, any property, etc.). Before the permit expires, he can travel back to the US and apply for another one, which will likely be granted, but could be limited to one year. In essence, he can keep trying to apply for a re-entry permit, but you normally only get two, maybe three in a row, for a total of about 3-5 years of time allowed outside the US, plus the delay in processing (this gives you de-facto more time if he chooses to receive the permit in Berlin, for example, as he'll already have left the US after his fingerprinting, and the permit could take six months).

 

Best would be to apply for citizenship if he's eligible, of course.

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