Best practices for applying to companies in Germany

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I have had renewed interest in trying to find an internship or a job in Germany, and so I came up with these more specific questions about the German job application process to refine my understanding about the process. For a bit of background about me, I'm a student going to an American university, and studying Finance. I previously studied Mechanical Engineering, but I did not like it. I have gotten EU citizenship, so I would be able to work and live in Germany without any problems. The only issue would be getting my German language skills up to university standards, but since I live in America, I don't have many ways to use/practice or learn a lot of German. I have previously tried applying for jobs in Germany, and have received one phone interview but did not get the job. I put everything into one thread to not spam the forum with a million questions. Below are my questions.

 

 

Is it okay if my curriculum vitae and cover letter are just in English, or does a German copy of my CV and cover letter always have to accompany the English version? For me, it would be difficult to translate everything into perfect German, so I hope that it would be fine not having a German copy.

 

What is the best format for a CV? I used this two paged template (linked below) for my CV. I used a professionally taken picture with a white background for my picture. I translated everything into English, and just filled everything in, until it looked about right.

https://cdn-tolingo.pressidium.com/wp-content/uploads/assets/129/cv_comments.doc

 

What is the best cover letter format? I simply tried using the template below, and translate/wrote everything in English.

https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://cdn-tolingo.pressidium.com/wp-content/uploads/assets/130/cover_letter_comments.doc

 

Is it okay to write the name of a school that you have not attended yet on the CV? For example, I'm going to be going to a new college in Fall, so should I put that as my current school, or just add the school I previously attended?

 

Should only the skills that are listed in the job description be rated in the "Computer Skills" section, or should I add additional rated skills which I believe to be necessary for the application?

 

Is it okay to abbreviate really long words or names on a German CV? For example, United States to USA, or Mississippi to MS. If not, what should be done?

 

What exactly would be best to put for "Hobbies", should only work related hobbies be included? And what can be included for "Other" interests? I included the fact that I have a driver's license, and that I'm an EU citizen in the "Other" section.

 

If I have had successful experience in trading stocks (day trading), and have made money via day trading, would adding day trading as work experience be possible? I suspect, it would help if I'm applying for a financial position, however I'm not sure how seriously German companies take day trading, or if it would better fit as a hobby.

 

If I get an internship or interview for an internship/job in Germany, should I tell the company that I'm going to be attending a German university in the future, even if the current school I attend is an American university?

 

And this is more of a superficial question, but are there any differences in applying for jobs in Germany as opposed to Austria? I was thinking that applying to jobs in both countries would open me up to more opportunities, since if I can't find anything in Germany, maybe an opportunity may come up in Austria. And Austria and Germany both speak German, albeit a different dialect, but I assume both countries have about the same standards.

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These are just IMHO as I am not really an expert in the field but rather based on my experience as an applicant.

 

Yes, you should take the time to have your CV translated to German.  If you can't do it yourself, then pay someone to do it.  Not doing that shows that you are not serious.  Sure, they can probably read it in English, but if you can't even be bothered to do that for your CV, then what kind of employee will you be for them?  The exception would be for a job that specifically mentions that it is an English only position which is really rare.

 

I would not include your hobbies or anything that is not directly related to the position in question.  This is a tendency for American CVs, but not really done in Germany.  For skills that are not related, you would have to be the judge.  For example, it the job description says "Oracle DB" and you know SQL, I would include it.  I probably would not list day trading unless you are applying for a position that is related to stock trading, but that would be your call based on the position.  

 

I would not list the name of the school that you will be attending.  Unless it is Stanford or MIT, the likelihood is that the German employer has never heard of it and the "ranking" of schools is not really a thing in Germany.  Plus, Germans are very exact (usually) and "fudging" an answer would be seen as lying.

 

If you will be attending a German University, however, I would mention that to show that you are serious about living here.  Just don't list it as if it were the current university that you are attending. 

 

I would not use abbreviations for states as these are generally not understood outside the US.  Is "MI" Minnesota, Michigan, Missouri, or Mississippi?  USA is universal, however I don't think you would need to include that at all unless it wasn't obvious.

 

In Germany, it is expected that you include a picture and information about your  marital situation.  This is odd for Americans since it is illegal to ask for such information in the States, but it is expected here.  There is some discrimination according to race and against women who are in child-bearing age and for older people.  This is terrible, I know and not officially sanctioned, but it happens.  However, in a hot market this might be less relevant.

 

Your biggest challenge is to show them that you are serious about the move to Germany and that you can speak enough of the language to get by.  EU citizenship, acceptance to a German University, any sort of proof of language skills, are all things that I would include.  Also the exact date that you intend to arrive in Germany if that is in your plans.  Also bring along EVERYTHING.  I was floored when asked to show my original High School diploma - which I got much longer ago than I care to admit or think about. 

 

You will also be considered much more seriously once you are already in the country.  It would be nice to have a job waiting for you and it is really a pain to move here then get a job in some other city and then move again, but that might be the way it works.

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5 hours ago, Domarx said:

Is it okay if my curriculum vitae and cover letter are just in English, or does a German copy of my CV and cover letter always have to accompany the English version? For me, it would be difficult to translate everything into perfect German, so I hope that it would be fine not having a German copy.

 

Depends on the company, and the industry.  And whether the role is english speaking.  i would say that for Finance in Frankfurt english is probably ok, for a family business deep in the black forest probably not.  Also bear in mind that if they are willing to hire someone who doesnt speak german, they will tpyically be ok with an english language application.Hard to say if its worth translating the CV, it certainly would not do any harm, but I doubt in your field that it is necessary.  In some fields (IT for example) I regularly see germans apply in english, Id say around 15% of them, presumably because they think its an international field and they wish to demonstrate their english skills

 

5 hours ago, Domarx said:

What is the best format for a CV? I used this two paged template (linked below) for my CV. I used a professionally taken picture with a white background for my picture. I translated everything into English, and just filled everything in, until it looked about right.

 

That looks about right. 

 

5 hours ago, Domarx said:

Is it okay to write the name of a school that you have not attended yet on the CV? For example, I'm going to be going to a new college in Fall, so should I put that as my current school, or just add the school I previously attended?

 

It is ok to say something like expected start and end dates.  But Im not sure what you expect them to read into that.  Perhaps just say in the cover letter that you are looking for a praktikum in the time before you go to University. 

 

5 hours ago, Domarx said:

Should only the skills that are listed in the job description be rated in the "Computer Skills" section, or should I add additional rated skills which I believe to be necessary for the application?

 

If you have relevant skills, then add them. You can rename the section to relevant skills or something else if you think it doesnt fit.

 

5 hours ago, Domarx said:

Is it okay to abbreviate really long words or names on a German CV? For example, United States to USA, or Mississippi to MS. If not, what should be done?

 

Abbreviations are fine as long as they are either understandable (ie USA) or not very important.  If the person reading the CV doesnt know what MS is it doesnt really matter if they think its Missouri or whatever.If its something they might not know like a qualification then Id make it clear.

 

5 hours ago, Domarx said:

What exactly would be best to put for "Hobbies", should only work related hobbies be included? And what can be included for "Other" interests? I included the fact that I have a driver's license, and that I'm an EU citizen in the "Other" section.

 

I would delete the section.  Noone gets a job because they wrote "I like reading and going to the movies".  If you keep it then keep it useful if you can, being a sports team captain shows leadership skills, qualified sailor shows some motivation and drive etc.

 

5 hours ago, Domarx said:

If I have had successful experience in trading stocks (day trading), and have made money via day trading, would adding day trading as work experience be possible? I suspect, it would help if I'm applying for a financial position, however I'm not sure how seriously German companies take day trading, or if it would better fit as a hobby.

 

 

I think either would be ok. If it were me I think Id put it separately maybe just in the cover letter and use it as evidence of my interest in the subject area.

 

5 hours ago, Domarx said:

If I get an internship or interview for an internship/job in Germany, should I tell the company that I'm going to be attending a German university in the future, even if the current school I attend is an American university?

 

At some point you will need to tell them "I can work from X to Y" and you will probably end up telling them why those dates are relevant. Being accepted into a university might be a positive, especially in finance.

 

5 hours ago, Domarx said:

And this is more of a superficial question, but are there any differences in applying for jobs in Germany as opposed to Austria? I was thinking that applying to jobs in both countries would open me up to more opportunities, since if I can't find anything in Germany, maybe an opportunity may come up in Austria. And Austria and Germany both speak German, albeit a different dialect, but I assume both countries have about the same standards.

 

 

I dont know for sure, but I can say that the applications I have seen from austrians or people living in austria are identical to the german ones. I expect the main difference is the job market, what skills are currently in demand, importance of language skills maybe... But as I said I dont have experience.

 

55 minutes ago, BradinBayern said:

Also bring along EVERYTHING.  I was floored when asked to show my original High School diploma - which I got much longer ago than I care to admit or think about.

 

Absolutely.

 

55 minutes ago, BradinBayern said:

You will also be considered much more seriously once you are already in the country.  It would be nice to have a job waiting for you and it is really a pain to move here then get a job in some other city and then move again, but that might be the way it works.

 

Also true.  The fact you have a place in a university here perhaps shows that you are serious about moving, but for a junior role many companies will seriously wonder if its worht hiring someone everseas.  Just the time difference for telephone interviews for example is annooying.

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May I also suggest creating a Xing profile?  Xing is a German Linkedin (you do have Linkedin, right?) I have my Xing profile in English and still get contacted by German headhunters in German. 

When I first looked for a job in Germany I did take full advantage of my hubbie being native speaker and sent applications in German, but I made it clear what my proficiency was at that time. Also, I didn't have the somehow still prevailing number of documents needed. I simply sent my CV (with pic but drew the line at the marital status) and explained in a cover letter that I don't have the usual-in-Germany official job reference, but my previous employers wrote a line or two on my LinkedIn profile, to which I've linked. It sufficed, but then I work in a rather progressive field (or one that like to sees itself as such) where Denglish is spoken on a daily basis and have very relevant work experience. If you don't have much to show, it may be wise to include a note from your professor or mentor. 

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The first link you referred to is 3 pages. My resume, even after 15 years of job experience, is only 2 pages. This is my 3rd job in Germany. My first job application was in German (I had very basic German, which my then bf looked over, but I insisted he left the 3rd grade level of German in there because I didn't want to give anyone any false impressions) - I had the whole "mappe" thing. Gosh,what a waste of paper and materials. The last 2 jobs I applied via email/online with PDFs of my documents. I did not add my marital status, but I used a picture (I figured it couldn't do any harm) AND I included that I was allowed to live and work in Germany, that I had permanent residence and work permits. 

 

Now, my resume would be 3 pages, which includes a cover letter.

 

IMO, if you cannot speak German, then don't bother translating your application. They might expect you can speak German. Nothing worse than showing up for an interview and not understanding a word they're asking you, right?  

 

About hobbies, personally, I would make sure you have 1 line of space at least for that at a end. For the job I have now, at my interview, my then boss questioned me about oneof my hobbies I had listed. It threw me off, but we had a nice talk for about 5 minutes. It actually helped me to relax and I think it helped him remember me, so...

 

Good luck.

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My thoughts is that even if you cannot speak German you should still have your CV translated, in case the application process gets automated and it's looking out for certain keywords.

 

This might not be the case if the keywords are universal (ie SQL).

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On 7/27/2017, 10:02:57, azures said:

My thoughts is that even if you cannot speak German you should still have your CV translated, in case the application process gets automated and it's looking out for certain keywords.

 

This might not be the case if the keywords are universal (ie SQL).

 

That's a good idea, I have not thought of the application process being automated. But I should be able to do the CV in German, and if there's something I don't know, I usually get my friend who speaks German to help translate.

 

On 7/27/2017, 7:10:41, Elfenstar said:

The first link you referred to is 3 pages. My resume, even after 15 years of job experience, is only 2 pages. This is my 3rd job in Germany. My first job application was in German (I had very basic German, which my then bf looked over, but I insisted he left the 3rd grade level of German in there because I didn't want to give anyone any false impressions) - I had the whole "mappe" thing. Gosh,what a waste of paper and materials. The last 2 jobs I applied via email/online with PDFs of my documents. I did not add my marital status, but I used a picture (I figured it couldn't do any harm) AND I included that I was allowed to live and work in Germany, that I had permanent residence and work permits. 

 

Now, my resume would be 3 pages, which includes a cover letter.

 

IMO, if you cannot speak German, then don't bother translating your application. They might expect you can speak German. Nothing worse than showing up for an interview and not understanding a word they're asking you, right?  

 

About hobbies, personally, I would make sure you have 1 line of space at least for that at a end. For the job I have now, at my interview, my then boss questioned me about oneof my hobbies I had listed. It threw me off, but we had a nice talk for about 5 minutes. It actually helped me to relax and I think it helped him remember me, so...

 

Good luck.

 

Oh, wow, that must have been troublesome, I couldn't even imagine having to send out or apply with actual paper to lots of companies haha. I agree with not getting a whole portfolio professionally translated so the hiring managers won't get any false impressions. On my first phone interview, I was interviewed by two staff, and one of the staff couldn't speak English very well, so I have a feeling they expected me to speak German fluently. But at the time, I thought they got false impressions. However, to not make any mistakes and to sound professional, I spoke English for the interview.

 

I also like using PDF files because they always come out really clean and neat, no matter what computer they are opened on.

 

Should I keep the fact that I'm an EU citizen and also have a driver's license in the hobbies section? Since, they might see that my location is in America and they may assume I won't be able to work in Germany because I'm not an EU citizen, and throw my application out

 

On 7/27/2017, 6:23:28, Meerschweinchen said:

May I also suggest creating a Xing profile?  Xing is a German Linkedin (you do have Linkedin, right?) I have my Xing profile in English and still get contacted by German headhunters in German. 

When I first looked for a job in Germany I did take full advantage of my hubbie being native speaker and sent applications in German, but I made it clear what my proficiency was at that time. Also, I didn't have the somehow still prevailing number of documents needed. I simply sent my CV (with pic but drew the line at the marital status) and explained in a cover letter that I don't have the usual-in-Germany official job reference, but my previous employers wrote a line or two on my LinkedIn profile, to which I've linked. It sufficed, but then I work in a rather progressive field (or one that like to sees itself as such) where Denglish is spoken on a daily basis and have very relevant work experience. If you don't have much to show, it may be wise to include a note from your professor or mentor. 

 

That is a good idea to create a Xing profile, I will do that. And yes, I do have a Linkedin, but I wasn't able to find many jobs in Germany on it. I'm not really bothered by sending my picture or my marital status, I suspect that it might be a good thing to send that information to the employer because they might know that I'm transparent and honest? As if, I'm not hiding anything and am committed to working there.  

 

May I ask what field you work in?

 

About the note, how exactly would that be done..? I imagine, I would go up to a professor at my school and ask him for a reference. But, how exactly would that be done if I'm applying via the internet to a company in Germany?

 

On 7/27/2017, 3:21:48, BradinBayern said:

Yes, you should take the time to have your CV translated to German.  If you can't do it yourself, then pay someone to do it.  Not doing that shows that you are not serious.  Sure, they can probably read it in English, but if you can't even be bothered to do that for your CV, then what kind of employee will you be for them?  The exception would be for a job that specifically mentions that it is an English only position which is really rare.

 

Most of the jobs which I have been applying to said that only English or English and German was required. I think that is good advice to use a German CV for English and German positions, and to use an English CV for English only positions.

 

On 7/27/2017, 3:21:48, BradinBayern said:

If you will be attending a German University, however, I would mention that to show that you are serious about living here.  Just don't list it as if it were the current university that you are attending. 

 

I agree with that. I was going to go through a list of every university in Germany, and then I would make a list of every school I liked, with the schools location. Then, I would tell the employer the name of the school closest to the job, and say that I would be interested in going to that school.

 

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It didn't let me edit this into my above reply, so I posted it as a separate post.

 

On 7/27/2017, 3:21:48, BradinBayern said:

Your biggest challenge is to show them that you are serious about the move to Germany and that you can speak enough of the language to get by.  EU citizenship, acceptance to a German University, any sort of proof of language skills, are all things that I would include.  Also the exact date that you intend to arrive in Germany if that is in your plans.  Also bring along EVERYTHING.  I was floored when asked to show my original High School diploma - which I got much longer ago than I care to admit or think about. 

 

You will also be considered much more seriously once you are already in the country.  It would be nice to have a job waiting for you and it is really a pain to move here then get a job in some other city and then move again, but that might be the way it works.

 

That is true. It may be tough, but I can do it. My original plan was to tell the employer that I am going to take online classes at an American university, and then I would transfer to the closest German university to the job site. However, I would not be able to get a university acceptance letter, since I don't live in the area, and there would be other jobs in other parts of Germany which I would be applying to.

 

I agree about giving them the date which I would move to Germany on. Would saying that I have visited Germany in the past a few times, or that I have friends/family in Germany help as proof that I am serious about moving there?

 

On 7/27/2017, 4:21:54, zwiebelfisch said:

Depends on the company, and the industry.  And whether the role is english speaking.  i would say that for Finance in Frankfurt english is probably ok, for a family business deep in the black forest probably not.  Also bear in mind that if they are willing to hire someone who doesnt speak german, they will typically be ok with an english language application.Hard to say if its worth translating the CV, it certainly would not do any harm, but I doubt in your field that it is necessary.  In some fields (IT for example) I regularly see germans apply in english, Id say around 15% of them, presumably because they think its an international field and they wish to demonstrate their english skills

 

Abbreviations are fine as long as they are either understandable (ie USA) or not very important.  If the person reading the CV doesnt know what MS is it doesnt really matter if they think its Missouri or whatever.If its something they might not know like a qualification then Id make it clear.

 

Also true.  The fact you have a place in a university here perhaps shows that you are serious about moving, but for a junior role many companies will seriously wonder if its worht hiring someone everseas.  Just the time difference for telephone interviews for example is annooying.


I was thinking that Finance is a more international field which doesn't require a fluent knowledge of German too. Which is why it may be easier to find a job in finance without a full knowledge of German over other fields.

 

I mainly wanted to include the abbreviations because some of the school and location names were really long and didn't fit too well on the page. I put a parenthesis around the first time I abbreviated something, so they'd know that's what the abbreviation means the second time I'd use it. For example, Connecticut (CT) and if I'd use that state again I'd just type "CT".

 

I think that would definitely help as well. But how would I select a location that I would move to first? Would I simply select the town/city that I like the most and try my luck there? And then once I find a job in another part of Germany, I would move out.

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Are you applying for CS related jobs, like data science, developer, ops, Product Manager etc? Then you can just ignore customs in Germany and do it in US/UK style. That means things don't have to be chronological, and you can get creative with style (by creative I don't mean colorful or stylish or something like that, I mean you can organize things in a way that showcases you best).  

 

Even big companies like DB, Siemens, BMW are used to get these sorts of resume so they won't bat an eye. For tech companies like Rocketfuel it's pretty much expected that you submit in English, because so many employee's native language isn't German to start with. I just used my UK CV for all applications, and almost all companies called me for an interview. I doubt the remaining ones rejected me because of the style of the CV.

 

At least in UK/US style resume, nobody cares what the detailed style choice are etc. Do not be constrained by German CV samples. Just get standard UK/US style resume advice and rely on that.

 

Note: I substituted company names for privacy reasons so I'm not talking about these particular companies based on personal experience, but I have personal experience with some other, comparable companies.

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3 hours ago, Domarx said:

Should I keep the fact that I'm an EU citizen and also have a driver's license in the hobbies section? Since, they might see that my location is in America and they may assume I won't be able to work in Germany because I'm not an EU citizen, and throw my application out

Citizienships should be listed in the personal data section (where you state date of birth, place of birth, maritial status and so on) at the very beginning of the CV.

 

3 hours ago, Domarx said:

About the note, how exactly would that be done..? I imagine, I would go up to a professor at my school and ask him for a reference. But, how exactly would that be done if I'm applying via the internet to a company in Germany?

Scan it. Usualy you also scan ALL of your transcripts and diplomas, too, and either email it together with CV and Anschreiben. Or, if there is a webinterface for the application there is usually the option to upload additional documents at the end.

 

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I would not try any tricks with listing a university you intend to attend.  This will not work.  Either you have been accepted to the university and intend on going there or not.  You could potentially throw an interview by not being totally honest, and believe me, the Germans will catch it.  They will start grilling you on when you intend to start, when you sent your application in, what you intend to study,  which professors you have spoken to, where you will live, etc.  Even when being totally honest I had some trouble answering all the questions that they had for me.  

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4 hours ago, Domarx said:

I was thinking that Finance is a more international field which doesn't require a fluent knowledge of German too. Which is why it may be easier to find a job in finance without a full knowledge of German over other fields.

 

It is one of the more international fields and most of the people I have met (Commerz, Hypo Banks mostly but a few others too) have been fully conversant in English.

 

4 hours ago, Domarx said:

I mainly wanted to include the abbreviations because some of the school and location names were really long and didn't fit too well on the page. I put a parenthesis around the first time I abbreviated something, so they'd know that's what the abbreviation means the second time I'd use it. For example, Connecticut (CT) and if I'd use that state again I'd just type "CT".

 

That is a normal way of representing abbreviations and would be fine.  But as I think I wrote elsewhere I doubt anyone will be too bothered which state a particular school is in.  Unless they know the place, Yale for example.  So Id say you can use abbreviations like that liberally.

 

4 hours ago, Domarx said:

I think that would definitely help as well. But how would I select a location that I would move to first? Would I simply select the town/city that I like the most and try my luck there? And then once I find a job in another part of Germany, I would move out.

 

If its finance then you almost certainly want to be in frankfurt (am Main).  Thats just where almost all of it is.  Sure there are companies and banks in other cities, but all the real action is frankfurt.

 

4 hours ago, Domarx said:

That is true. It may be tough, but I can do it. My original plan was to tell the employer that I am going to take online classes at an American university, and then I would transfer to the closest German university to the job site. However, I would not be able to get a university acceptance letter, since I don't live in the area, and there would be other jobs in other parts of Germany which I would be applying to.

 

Just say something like planning to study from Winter Semester 2018, and say whether you want to work as a Werkstudent while you study.

 

4 hours ago, Domarx said:

I agree about giving them the date which I would move to Germany on. Would saying that I have visited Germany in the past a few times, or that I have friends/family in Germany help as proof that I am serious about moving there?

 

Yes, at least in the companies I have worked.  One of the main concerns we have had is the idea that people are just randomly spamming eurpean (or worldwide) companies with applications with no clear intent.  We dont want to invest in interviewing someone that is just as likely to end up in australia or canada.  Showing that you are really serious about the country (or better the city) is one of the huge hurdles for international applications.  In my experience.

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20 hours ago, dampstew said:

Are you applying for CS related jobs, like data science, developer, ops, Product Manager etc? Then you can just ignore customs in Germany and do it in US/UK style. That means things don't have to be chronological, and you can get creative with style (by creative I don't mean colorful or stylish or something like that, I mean you can organize things in a way that showcases you best).  

 

I'm mainly applying for anything at an office, but focusing on jobs with my major (while I'm still studying) which is Finance. I don't think I'd be able to do a manager position in Germany because I believe a manager would have to speak/write fluent German?

 

18 hours ago, BradinBayern said:

I would not try any tricks with listing a university you intend to attend.  This will not work.  Either you have been accepted to the university and intend on going there or not.  You could potentially throw an interview by not being totally honest, and believe me, the Germans will catch it.  They will start grilling you on when you intend to start, when you sent your application in, what you intend to study,  which professors you have spoken to, where you will live, etc.  Even when being totally honest I had some trouble answering all the questions that they had for me.  

 

Would it be okay to tell them that I am planning on transferring to a German school in the future? Or, what would be the best? I feel like if I don't say anything about eventually attending a German school, they might not take me as seriously.

 

18 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

If its finance then you almost certainly want to be in frankfurt (am Main).  Thats just where almost all of it is.  Sure there are companies and banks in other cities, but all the real action is frankfurt.

 

Yes, at least in the companies I have worked.  One of the main concerns we have had is the idea that people are just randomly spamming eurpean (or worldwide) companies with applications with no clear intent.  We dont want to invest in interviewing someone that is just as likely to end up in australia or canada.  Showing that you are really serious about the country (or better the city) is one of the huge hurdles for international applications.  In my experience.

 

Would it be more difficult to get into a school in the Frankfurt area? I'm mainly thinking that it could be, because Frankfurt is a big city with a lot of people, so schools have more choices. And I've read (in this thread or another thread) that German schools don't have rankings, so I'm assuming people simply go to the school that's closest to where they live.

 

I was assuming people from other countries did that, so I was thinking that I might not appear as serious because of that. Is there any way to show them that I'm serious about living in a certain city or town? 

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I think it would be fine to say that you intend to attend a German Uni, just be ready to answer questions about exactly what you have done to research and apply to the Uni.  The likelihood that the person that you are interviewing with actually have attended that Uni themselves is probably high.  Just don't make stuff up.

 

There are some attempts to rank Universities, but I know of no one who really pays much attention to that.  It is more based on reputation and word of mouth.  Maybe that is changing?  I don't know.

 

Here are some examples of rankings but I am not sure what stock I would put in them:

http://news.efinancialcareers.com/de-de/164580/ranking-die-besten-unis-fur-angehende-finanzprofis-in-deutschland-und-der-schweiz

http://www.che-ranking.de/cms/?getObject=2&getLang=de  

 

I would also recommend Munich.  I disagree that everything is only happening in Frankfurt in finance. Frankfurt is number one, but not the only one.  

 

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On 8/1/2017, 4:46:36, Domarx said:

 

That's a good idea, I have not thought of the application process being automated. But I should be able to do the CV in German, and if there's something I don't know, I usually get my friend who speaks German to help translate.

 

x2 with getting a good translator since what you have in mind will not necessarily translate well with Google Translate, or it's not in the 'common work vocabulary'.

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9 hours ago, BradinBayern said:

There are some attempts to rank Universities, but I know of no one who really pays much attention to that.  It is more based on reputation and word of mouth.  Maybe that is changing?  I don't know.

 

Here are some examples of rankings but I am not sure what stock I would put in them:

http://news.efinancialcareers.com/de-de/164580/ranking-die-besten-unis-fur-angehende-finanzprofis-in-deutschland-und-der-schweiz

http://www.che-ranking.de/cms/?getObject=2&getLang=de  

 

I would also recommend Munich.  I disagree that everything is only happening in Frankfurt in finance. Frankfurt is number one, but not the only one.  

 

 

When I was researching schools in Germany, I found out about something called KIT, and it seemed like they were the better funded schools, therefore higher ranked?

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Universities_Excellence_Initiative

 

However, would that mean that schools with a higher reputation be more difficult for someone who doesn't speak fluent German? And also more expensive to attend?

 

Do you think that it would be more economical to start off in a smaller city/town at first? Because without a job, living expenses in a bigger city may be too costly, and a lesser expensive apartment in a bigger city may be in a bad area?

 

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1 hour ago, Domarx said:

 

 

However, would that mean that schools with a higher reputation be more difficult for someone who doesn't speak fluent German? And also more expensive to attend?

 

 

Not necessarily.  I was accepted to two of those schools, because they both had programs offered partially in english (the understanding was that they would fund by german language courses so that i could also take german subject courses - i ended up taking a fluid mechanics course in german, which worked out ok.  the final exam was oral, so the professor switched to english - was an interesting experience).  The school i ended up at offered me a research scholarship from the BMBF that had some sort of foundation in wanting to foster international studying relationships. So take it with a grain of salt, but my understanding of both those schools was that they had good access to funding and therefore has the benefit of being able to bring in some international students.  

 

 

 

 

 

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Smaller towns certainly are less expensive.  But I think you want to be in a larger city if you are studying Finance. 

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4 hours ago, Domarx said:

However, would that mean that schools with a higher reputation be more difficult for someone who doesn't speak fluent German?

 

Possibly, if the standards are higher. On the other hand, they might offer more courses in English. 

 

Quote

And also more expensive to attend?

 

Not necessarily.  You need to realise that the German educational system is very different from the American one. There are many private schools that will accept anyone who can pay. Since public universities usually have very low fees, many Germans assume that grads of expensive private schools were not good enough for a public school. 

 

Quote

 

Do you think that it would be more economical to start off in a smaller city/town at first? Because without a job, living expenses in a bigger city may be too costly, and a lesser expensive apartment in a bigger city may be in a bad area?

 

 

Again, you need to realise that transferring schools during a degree is not common for most majors in Germany  (an exception is Theology). Very often it is only possible to receive credits for a fraction of the courses completed at another institution.

 

You should choose a school where you'd want to complete your degree.

 

18 hours ago, Domarx said:

Would it be okay to tell them that I am planning on transferring to a German school in the future? Or, what would be the best? I feel like if I don't say anything about eventually attending a German school, they might not take me as seriously.

 

I think your biggest obstacle to be taken seriously is not being currently enrolled at a German university. Companies pay lower social security contributions for Werkstudenten, making them cheaper than regular part-time employees. 

 

Have you looked into a Dualstudium?

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On 8/2/2017, 2:24:22, Joanie said:

 

Not necessarily.  I was accepted to two of those schools, because they both had programs offered partially in english (the understanding was that they would fund by german language courses so that i could also take german subject courses - i ended up taking a fluid mechanics course in german, which worked out ok.  the final exam was oral, so the professor switched to english - was an interesting experience).  The school i ended up at offered me a research scholarship from the BMBF that had some sort of foundation in wanting to foster international studying relationships. So take it with a grain of salt, but my understanding of both those schools was that they had good access to funding and therefore has the benefit of being able to bring in some international students.  

 

How much English did the classes use? I was E-mailing someone from TU Braunschweig last year about English engineering classes, and they said that it was in German with a few English modules. It didn't seem like a lot.

 

On 8/2/2017, 4:19:25, engelchen said:

 

Not necessarily.  I was accepted to two of those schools, because they both had programs offered partially in english (the understanding was that they would fund by german language courses so that i could also take german subject courses - i ended up taking a fluid mechanics course in german, which worked out ok.  the final exam was oral, so the professor switched to english - was an interesting experience).  The school i ended up at offered me a research scholarship from the BMBF that had some sort of foundation in wanting to foster international studying relationships. So take it with a grain of salt, but my understanding of both those schools was that they had good access to funding and therefore has the benefit of being able to bring in some international students.  

 

That is different. Is it possible to choose your own classes at a German university? For example, you may choose a class at 2 PM and another at 4 PM from your course of study, or do you have to go to college every single day with the same pre-planned classes every day (like at an American high school.)

 

Would that make it easier to get a Werkstudent position? Since they might think that a foreigner will do the job no matter what, and won't complain since that's all they could get.

 

I also read in another thread that most Germans don't really complete their university education; Is this true? 

 

I have not heard of Dualstudium, what exactly is that?

 

And also, does anyone know what an "Ausbildung" is? I heard someone talking about it a couple of months ago, and it escaped my mind until now. Would it be possible to do an Ausbildung with something related to/in finance; and would it be more beneficial than being a Werkstudent and attending a university?

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