Trump's Presidency: Is this the next domino to fall?

4,907 posts in this topic

But what do Hunter Biden's actions have to do with Trump's presidential and personal failings? 

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, AlexTr said:

But what do Hunter Biden's actions have to do with Trump's presidential and personal failings? 

 

It's called whataboutism, a favorite method of distraction from the question at hand... a common tactic on the lunatic fringe. *cough* :D

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Metall said:

 

It's called whataboutism, a favorite method of distraction from the question at hand... a common tactic on the lunatic fringe. *cough* :D

 

Not only is it the favorite of nutters and know-nothings, but it is also favored by authoritarian cocksucking shitsquibs everywhere.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, AlexTr said:

authoritarian cocksucking shitsquibs

But enough about Loretta.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, the other day I posted about the judge's order in the Flynn case. You remember the one, right? The one that said every portion of the Mueller report involving Flynn has to be unredacted AND the judge wants to hear Trump lawyer John M. Dowd's voicemail message left for Flynn. (Seriously, what kind of halfwit must he be to leave a voicemail that is not protected under any confidentiality agreement?) Today, I awoke to the news that Republican Congressman Justin Amash has stated publicly that Trump's actions are obstruction and certainly provide a basis for impeachment. How many more GOP Senators and Congresspeople will join him before the judge's order makes all of these things public and they have to scramble not to look like the wildly unpatriotic partisan hacks they are?

 

Quote

U.S. Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan on Saturday became the first congressional Republican to conclude that President Donald Trump has engaged in "impeachable conduct."

 

His conclusion came after he read special counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, he tweeted in a widely circulated thread.

 

"President Trump has engaged in impeachable conduct," he tweeted.

 

He also said Attorney General William Barr "deliberately misrepresented Mueller’s report" with a four-page summary sent to Congress in March before the release of the full, redacted report.

...
 

Amash tweeted, "Contrary to Barr’s portrayal, Mueller’s report reveals that President Trump engaged in specific actions and a pattern of behavior that meet the threshold for impeachment."

 

"In fact," he said, "Mueller’s report identifies multiple examples of conduct satisfying all the elements of obstruction of justice, and undoubtedly any person who is not the president of the United States would be indicted based on such evidence."

 

 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But that's not the only illegal activity in the White House right now. Complaints grow that Trump staffers are campaigning for their boss.

 

Quote

A Trump appointee displayed a “Make America Great Again” hat at her Housing and Urban Development office.

 

A top official at the Office of Management and Budget used his official Twitter account to promote President Donald Trump’s campaign slogan.

 

And White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway delivered a scathing and unprompted attack on Trump’s potential opponent, Joe Biden, during a TV interview.

 

Those three instances — all in the last few months — are just a few of the growing number of complaints since Trump took office that federal employees are using their platform to campaign for the president or his allies, a violation of the Hatch Act. In Trump’s first year on the job, formal complaints to the government office that oversees compliance with the 80-year-old law jumped nearly 30 percent.

 

Such sloganeering would once have startled lawmakers and even the public. In an early executive order, Thomas Jefferson admonished government employees for trying to “influence the votes of others,” calling it “inconsistent with the spirit of the Constitution.” Nearly a century and a half later, Congress made it official with the Hatch Act, hoping to quell concerns that the powerful Franklin D. Roosevelt-era Democratic machine was using government workers to sway elections.

 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now