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Rules for changing your first name in Germany

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Hi guys,

 

 

did anyone succeed in changing the FIRST name in Germany?

 

I am allowed to ''get'' my husband last name, which is very german-friendly but since i also want to change my first name, which they didnt allow me, i end up didnt change it at all..

The reason why i want to change my name is its long, and NOONE here is able to speak it so far. I swear im getting cancer hearing them try ( no offense to their effort but...)

I have been to several office they said they would not do anything about it UNTIL i get a german pass.

It would take years before that happen and im not even sure i want one, but NOW im living in Germany and need to deal with introducing myself . And if later the more i live here, if my circle gets bigger, isnt it kinda late to change my name?

 

I have been mulling website in the internet, they said its possible after the naturalization test, but is there any way to get it done before?

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As I undersatnd it until you become german you use whatever other countries rules for name changes and germany just acepts whateer your country recognises you as.

 

I know nothing about vietnamese (where your profile says you are from)  name rules but I would guess its easier to change your name under vietnamese law and simply tell the germans that you have a new name.  Once you become german it is difficult you are subject to the annoying german rules where "my name is too long" is no reason to change it.

 

Cant you just use a nickname?  When I am introduced to people noone ever questioned if my name matches my paperwork, and I know a few people who go by alternate names for example I know an Andreas who everyone calls Ben, but he is officially still Andreas.

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Agree- does partner use your full name? What do friends call you?

My friends call me by a shortened name.  Use  a shorter version.

No big deal.

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I agree with zwiebelfish in both suggestions. 
You don't have to use the nickname sweetiepie. Use the name yoj intend to change yours to, so that people start calling you that already. Done.

 

My son changed his last name, when he went to live in Guyana. His German name has an Umlaut, and the way English people pronounce it -- well, it sounds a bit rude in English. The German authorities actually acknowledged that in their  explanation.

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1. Zwiebelfisch has it correct: since you are not a German citizen, German authorities are not allowed to change your name. Because they are not allowed to issue you a new passport.

2. Take into account that name change generally is not allowed under German law. Marriage is one of the exceptions where you can take your husbands last name. Naturalization is another exception where you are allowed to make minor changes to your name to germanize it (for example, change Hannah to Anne, Zofia to Sofia or Hyulya to Julia). You are however not allowed to change Margaret to Anna or Ahmed to Günther.

 

Reason for this strict law is not the discrimination of foreigners (as it can be easily seen), but lack of central citizen's identifying number similar to US SSN. There is a social security number and Germany wide tax number, but both at the moment are not used for ID purposes (even when it is possible). That's why German name change law generally forbids name changes at citizen's wish.

 

Change your name before you get German citizenship and get it recognized. Then it may be too late.

 

Name change law:

https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/nam_ndg/BJNR000090938.html

 

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i already tried google everything i can about changing my name under vietnamese law, sadly i cant find any information about changing my vietnamese into a german or an english one.

I guess i cant do it in the internet. I will go to an lawyer when i go back to my country, Thanks everyone

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@diding: we call you Susy for the meantime :). I have 5 Thai colleagues, but they all use nicknames in the office since nobody can pronounce their very long first names.

 

@yourkeau: I never heard about Hyulya. Is that Ukrainian? I know Yulia, Yuliya, Juliya, Iulia and Iuliia. 

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Turkish. Spelling can be a bit incorrect, but it definitely begins with H. The ones you list are different spellings of the same name in Cyrillic: Юлія (Ukrainian) or Юлия (Russian).

 

Hopefully, Vietnamese unlike other Asian languages uses Latin alphabet, so by changing name in her home country OP can get exactly the same spelling she can use in Germany.

 

Edit: correct spelling is Hülya, my apologies. Although Hyulya exists as well, but most probably Bulgarian (=transliteration from Cyryllic).

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9 hours ago, yourkeau said:

You are however not allowed to change Margaret to Anna or Ahmed to Günther.

 

 

 

 

You can - for example, if you take up German citizenship and explain to authorities that you do not want to have a name that would automatically identify you as Muslim. Generally, you can change the name if the name is a "hardship" for you. I do think it is considered a hardship if you have a name that nobody can pronounce - but, as already mentioned, this is for German citizens, as long as you have another citizenship, you have to change your name according to that law.

 

In several countries, changing the name is very easy, so probably it is much easier for you if you do it according to the law in your country of citizenship.

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14 hours ago, yourkeau said:

You are however not allowed to change Margaret to Anna or Ahmed to Günther.

 

 

 

I think you are indeed allowed to do this. At naturalization you are allowed to "germanize" your first and last name, so John Smith can become Johannes Schmidt. But, if there is no German equivalent to your name, you are then allowed to choose a new first name (change of last name is not allowed). So if your first name is Ahmed and since there is no german equivalent of this name, you can choose a completely new first name like Günther. Here is what the law says:

 

Art. 47 des Einführungsgesetzes zum Bürgerlichen Gesetzbuch/EGBGB

 

5. Es kann die deutschsprachige Form des Vor- oder Familiennamens angenommen werden.
Gibt es eine solche Form des Vornamens nicht, kann ein neuer Vorname gewählt werden
(z.B. „Piotr Sajc“ wird „Peter Seitz“). Die Übersetzung von Familiennamen ist nicht zulässig.

 

Information for Munich: Infos zu Angleichung von Namen (PDF, 56 KB

 

Link: https://www.muenchen.de/rathaus/Stadtverwaltung/Kreisverwaltungsreferat/Standesamt-und-Urkunden/Namensaenderungen/Namens-nderung--BGB-.html

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13 hours ago, arunadasi said:

His German name has an Umlaut, and the way English people pronounce it -- well, it sounds a bit rude in English.

 

Was his name Küntz? ;)

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Just wondering if the OP has a middle name, or two?

I know a lot of Germans who generally go by their middle name, as they do not like their first name.

 

I also know somebody who recently got their first name officially changed - it cost a fortune to get every piece of paperwork changed, and she even had to have a chat with a psychiatrist to make sure that she was in a decent state of mind to make such a decision!!!

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17 minutes ago, robinson100 said:

Just wondering if the OP has a middle name, or two?

I know a lot of Germans who generally go by their middle name, as they do not like their first name.

 

I also know somebody who recently got their first name officially changed - it cost a fortune to get every piece of paperwork changed, and she even had to have a chat with a psychiatrist to make sure that she was in a decent state of mind to make such a decision!!!

why everything in this country need to be SO FREAKING complicated?

 

My cousin married an american and get her name from Lan to Joanna without any problem

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1 hour ago, robinson100 said:

Just wondering if the OP has a middle name, or two?

I know a lot of Germans who generally go by their middle name, as they do not like their first name.

 

I also know somebody who recently got their first name officially changed - it cost a fortune to get every piece of paperwork changed, and she even had to have a chat with a psychiatrist to make sure that she was in a decent state of mind to make such a decision!!!

Funny thing here in Greece, Rob: all my official stuff here: bank book, some notary stuff, tax number stuff etc:all comes with my Dad´s first name on it! eg my bank book: John William (all correct so far!!) Ernest ( the dodgy bit, my Dad´s first name !!) Gunn!!

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Same here, they also included it in my prepaid mobile phone contracr and internet connection, mind you he shared your first name so it's not bad, but I do fail to see the relevance particularly as he died almost 25 years ago.

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