Studying Law in Germany

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I think you can also be proud of yourself as a 15-year-old. You make plans for the future, you have ambition and are motivated. Well done! I was mainly outside playing football as a 15-year-old :). 

 

PS- If you have no clue what to do later on, you can always get into IT, haha.

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@kiplette

by less mainstream I mean that in Germany in Gymnasium is something that generally everyone knows about and has access to one, whilst in Britain they're not as common as in Germany as it's currently illegal for more to be set up as a selective education isn't something favoured in Britain, I'm not sure why as I think the system works a dream. 

Grammar schools are quite uncommon and therefore when there's one nearby they seriously drive up house prices and parents get very competitive over them, a friend of mine was tutored for 6 years to pass the entrance exams. But my school isn't 'less mainstream' in the sense it's different, it ranks extremely highly in national league tables, but that they aren't as accessible as in Germany.

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Aha. Gotcha. Unless you live in Kent, of course.

 

One of the difficulties of the system is that youngsters with access to tutoring have an advantage, so it does not work like a dream for all, and also failing the 11+ (which is taken mostly by 10 year olds) can be quite a scarring experience.

 

Having said that, if you are happy with it and doing well, then that's great! Good luck with the GCSEs (I was in the GCE/GCSE swop over year group for some of my subjects - like ancient history to you guys now).

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22 hours ago, futjurastudent said:

I am planning on doing a language camp for teenagers during a holiday in Berlin next year.

 

Take the opportunity to visit German universities and speak with law students. Have a look at offices of lawyers; what you can read in the post Panda drew your attention to is correct -- they are generally not posh.  

 

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According to your link non-EU students will pay €1,500 per semester. This is still cheap and below cost level. I'm not happy with financing non-EU students as a German tax payer. These students nor their parents haven't paid anything into the system and many leave the country after they completed their free studies.

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@Feierabend @LukeSkywalker

 

Yes that's right I'm a Polish citizen and because it's unclear what's happening in relation to UK tuition fees as they're rising anyway but whether they'll go to what current non-eu students pay isn't clear right now, my parents are very supporting of me wanting to study in Germany. It's also not clear whether i could get a student loan and whilst my parents could probably afford to send me to a uni in the uk without the loan (along with me living very sparingly), i have a twin sister and this therefore would double the price making it impossible for my parents. I might end up getting dual citizenship but right now I'm only a Polish citizen.

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2 hours ago, LukeSkywalker said:

These students nor their parents haven't paid anything into the system and many leave the country after they completed their free studies.

 

Yes, but enough of them stay to make up for that by paying taxes. At least the numbers were still working out a few years ago. I posted a link to an article mentioning this in some other thread about university education. 

 

Currently debating with myself if it would make sense to have lower fees in Regelstudienzeit and higher afterwards. 

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@LenkaG

 

what's is your general opinion language schools and University Pathway programs which supposedly prepare your German language to University level and sometimes give you a conditional offer letter to universities?

 

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I'm too tired to give good advice just now, but wanted to say the OP is a nice young man who is intelligently researching what to do in life. Way better than I did (but worked out in the end)! Carry on. :)

 

And yes, do language camps, maybe an international internship or Praktikum.

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@Metall

Thanks, yeah i'll be doing language camps and having private lessons in addition to what i have at school, and once I'm old enough i'll try and do an internship

 

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1 hour ago, futjurastudent said:

what's is your general opinion language schools and University Pathway programs which supposedly prepare your German language to University level and sometimes give you a conditional offer letter to universities?

 

I have written about this, so first I will quote from one of my posts: 

 

Quote
On 6.1.2017, 19:46:10, carareandreea said:

I am wondering if it is possible for me to learn the language this year in order to go to university.

 

Yes, it is, but consistent work is required throughout. If you sign up for a preparatory course at a university, you will see that it should take you 2 semesters to pass the DSH exam. I did this when I first came here even though I did not want to study again. The course had 20 scheduled hours a week and then I spent about another 20 on homework and preparing for classes and let's say another 20 doing other activities in German. In the second semester I started working part time so I only worked on my German about 40 hours a week. For you, the other activities should involve using vocabulary relevant to what you want to study. Note that even state universities charge some tuition fees for these courses. 

 

Many people fail at least one semester because they spend too much time talking in other languages and do not prepare for the specific course they will do (these language courses are general). Universities tend to limit how long you can study, e.g. here it is 3 semesters.

 

I got a place on the DSH course through the Dual Careers Service at the university rather than as a student. I think it was the most cost effective way for me to learn the language. My course was excellent. In the second semester (once I was at about B1 level), I was reading a lot of articles in Die Zeit because they have a good HE section and I worked at the university. The DSH course on its own, regardless of how great yours might be, would not be enough for you to be able to walk into a law lecture and follow all that is said. You need to make sure that you have the basic vocabulary required. You could/must learn some of that by reading some texts beforehand, and you can find some info on what could be useful in the module book, for example, and you can also ask students in the law Fachschaftsrat (LMU, sort of like the student union) for recommendations. I am not sure what lawyers read online, but the LMU has listed some links (their course materials are password-protected). Once you'd be a regular student, you would need to prepare ahead of your lectures by having a look at what will be covered and making sure you have the vocabulary for that. 

 

I am not sure what you mean by saying that the language school gives you a conditional letter. Most people come to university DSH courses by applying for a regular place with inadequate language skills. Is that what you meant? Do bear in mind it is only possible to start studying law at LMU in the winter semester. (Have you already spoken to some of their advisors?) Also, if someone needs to repeat a semester on the DSH course, it is very likely their language skills are not good enough to study law.         

 

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@LenkaG

http://www.gls-german-courses.de/fileadmin/pdf/pathway1_b.pdf

http://www.gls-german-courses.de/3300_university_placement_german.html#c43314

this is an example program at the GLS school in Berlin and it talks about getting a conditional letter at a partner uni, I've seen this at a few of these programs but I don't believe these unis rank that highly and probably wouldn't offer law anyway.

I haven't spoken to any advisors as of yet because I still think its quite early as I am still 15 and if i would take a year out to learn German i would be 19/20 when the semester would start due t my september birthday, so in essence i have around 4 and a half years left.

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3 minutes ago, futjurastudent said:

this is an example program at the GLS school in Berlin

 

I have no experience with these, but can tell you my course was significantly cheaper. I know that some other universities charge more, but those I have looked at were also more flexible with block courses and I guess took also students who did things at the last minute (and some of the students who failed my course paid them to have another shot at passing the exam :)).

 

8 minutes ago, futjurastudent said:

i have around 4 and a half years left

 

I understand. Those who work with freshers, though, are usually used to speaking to students of your age as well. There are plenty of students asking general questions to help them decide what to study or even if studying at a university is a good choice for them in the first place.  

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@LenkaG

 

Thanks, i will probably try to email some of the international offices at quite a few universities. I know that a-levels are considered equal to the Abitur when certain subjects have been completed for your studies of choice. for law i've read that I would need maths, a science, a foreign language and a related subject. I have no problem with the first three but what would you class as a relevant subject, would politics be one?

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2 minutes ago, futjurastudent said:

would politics be one

 

I have worked with science and occasionally engineering students, so I don't have any experience with law admissions, but that does sound reasonable to me. Thinking back to my school days, the relatively small international school did not offer politics and those interested in law took history.  

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@LenkaG

I have considered history but i'm doing it now for GCSE and whilst it is very interesting it definitely isn't a strong point of mine and it only gets harder at A-Level and i think that i'd need the best a-levels as possible and i think politics would be better as i have quite an interest in it.

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Economics.

 

In Germany, we have the combined subject "Wirtschaft & Recht", i.e. "Economics & Law" in school.

Please see here for sample Bavarian Abitur questions (including solutions): https://www.isb.bayern.de/gymnasium/leistungserhebungen/musterabitur-2011-gymnasium/wirtschaft-und-recht/

 

Here are the questions&solutions from the other subjects: https://www.isb.bayern.de/gymnasium/leistungserhebungen/musterabitur-2011-gymnasium/

and here (no solutions): https://www.isb.bayern.de/gymnasium/leistungserhebungen/abiturpruefung-gymnasium/

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