Had a bad experience at gynecologist during routine pregnancy check-ups

75 posts in this topic

15 minutes ago, New in DE said:

To clarify, what I meant by that sentence, was the reason why certain doctors and clinics are more popular than others, because they have the edge - empathy. 

 

And, as you wrote...

 

 

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Giessen is a smaller town and not many staff in clinics speak English.

 

 

...none of them "more popular" seem to be located in Giessen. Bummer.

 

If you continue vociferating how wrong they doctors/nurses in Giessen are and how they ought to be now that you're living there, this thread is soon going to die.

 

If you change your strategy to the "Ok, I've got to make the best out of the situation" approach and ask for tips and hints to cope/survive/accept, you might get help...

 

Seriously, you won't get around adjusting your attitude.

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Franklan tries to portray the image of Germany as „don't complain, do what the boss says“ country. The chief doctor in Bamberg also thought so. 7 years jail.

 

And discussing the patients record in public is the violation of Schweigepflicht,  you can go to the police and press charges. Even when this will not bring the doctor to a court, the investigation alone will learn them to keep the mouth shut.

 

Someone has to be an asshole and fight for their rights and the rights of everyone else.

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3 minutes ago, yourkeau said:

Franklan tries to portray the image of Germany as „don't complain, do what the boss says“ country. The chief doctor in Bamberg also thought so. 7 years jail.

 

Are you out of your mind? The bloke in that article anesthetised and raped patients...

 

Someone has to be an asshole and fight for their rights and the rights of everyone else.

The only right the OP has to fight for is the is the right to be healthy of that little person in her womb. Listening to what nurses and doctors say is her only choice, is her chances of finishing her studies in medicine within the less than 9 month left are rather slim...

 

 

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@yourkeau, if you tried to take every doctor to court where the Arzthelferin mentioned something in the waiting room, in response to a question no less, you'd be out of doctors soon. An incident like that won't stick.

 

I live in the UK and in every practice/surgery I've ever been to it said, if you want to speak to the receptionist in confidence you need to let them know beforehand, implying that non-confidential is the default. So if I ask whether if there was something dodgy in my blood test, the whole waiting room can potentially hear it.

Germany is similar, it just doesn't get spelled out on a poster.  The Hebamme comment was probably well meaning, they assume that if you go to an OB/GYN you want to stick with straight forward "Schulmedizin", i.e. the standard(ized) treatment.

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21 hours ago, lisa13 said:

Now, I have to admit I was a bit perturbed the first time I went to my hausarzt for a standard checkup and he told me to take off my clothes, then just stood there waiting...not what I have ever experienced before!  I wasn't so much embarrassed as just taken by surprise and wasn't sure what to do - should I take the time to fold my clothes or just leave my pants and socks (should I leave those on?) laying on the floor so as not to waste the doctor's time?  Yes.  Deep questions indeed.  Not too long after that I was in the hospital for a week and had to do this several times a day for all kinds of people (doctors, students, nurses, ffs photographers?) so I got used to it, and actually came to enjoy it as it does seem less "shameful", and more honest, do just strip down and let them do their thing, without all the puritan rigmarole.

 

But I can totally understand it might not be an easy adjustment for everyone.  It's *very* different.

 

On 8 May 2017 at 12:47:13 PM, Kalifornierin said:

I had experiences which were similar, but not related to pregnancy.  My first gyn visit was a nightmare, but really just because I expected things to be the same as in the US and was just clueless.  The Dr. said to take off my trousers and get on the table, but there was no paper gown to put on. It was totally uncomfortable and no one explained what was happening.  Afterwards I spoke with some Austrian women who said that's totally normal here (they are much more comfortable with nudity than I am).  

 

Thanks for sharing your experiences @lisa13 and @Kalifornierin

. I was lucky to have read about this on some blogs before my first visit at the doctor, and was kind of prepared.. and yes, it wasn't easy to adjust.. haha!

 

On 8 May 2017 at 12:47:13 PM, Kalifornierin said:

For sure it would have been a lot better if I had known ahead of time.  I  recommend to find someone who has been through pregnancy visits in your area already and could really tell you what to expect. If you aren't suprised, it will be a lot easier to relax and cope.

 

Another thing I did was to make a "vocab" list with a friend in German of the common topics that might come up.  My Dr. speaks a little English, but sometimes forgets words.  I suggest a word in German, then it makes it easier to say yes or no to my questions.  Getting medical care in a foreign country is not easy, but you can do things to prepare yourself, and help the Dr. and nurses help you. 

 

Great idea! - I just started on some pregnancy yoga yesterday and met some really nice ladies who gave me many awesome tips. Really if I had known, I would encourage all first-time mums-to-be to join some form of support group.. 

 

I second your idea too - I had this list of vocabulary words that has to do with pregnancy, so it did helped me to get through the visits with a little 'Denglish' whenever the doctors/ nurses were unable to explain terminologies in english. 

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21 minutes ago, franklan said:

Are you out of your mind? The bloke in that article anesthetised and raped patients...

And why do you think how he came up to this „brilliant“ idea? The „shut up“ mentality made him think nobody would ever complain... After all, he is a Chefarzt, he is a king.

 

16 minutes ago, Marianne013 said:

@yourkeau, if you tried to take every doctor to court where the Arzthelferin mentioned something in the waiting room, in response to a question no less, you'd be out of doctors soon. An incident like that won't stick.

So far the number of doctors or helpers who mentioned my diagnosis in the waiting room is zero. I have never sued anyone in Germany, I have time and money, don't worry about my health.

 

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Germany is similar, it just doesn't get spelled out on a poster. 

Nope, Germany is not similar. I don't know maybe it's a bit different in the Communist parts of Germany, but in Bavaria the Schweigepflicht is followed strictly: not even my dentist talks anything about my teeth in public (not that I would object), we always discuss my treatment in a closed room. The waiting room here in Bavaria is used... for waiting only. The reception is used for appointments only. No talking about patient's business ever.

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45 minutes ago, franklan said:

...none of them "more popular" seem to be located in Giessen. Bummer.

 

If you continue vociferating how wrong they doctors/nurses in Giessen are and how they ought to be now that you're living there, this thread is soon going to die.

 

If you change your strategy to the "Ok, I've got to make the best out of the situation" approach and ask for tips and hints to cope/survive/accept, you might get help...

 

Seriously, you won't get around adjusting your attitude.

 

Seriously @franklan, I know you have your opinions about medical care and all since this is your country. But I find your posts neither helpful or useful. 

 

I had a bad experience with a clinic in Giessen and would like a change in the clinic, period. As much as I have done my part to learn the language and have a vocab list on hand doesn't make me a pro in German - and I have to accept that as I continue to improve it. Therefore, I have preference for english-speaking doctors and nurses, and that is my preference. I've never stated that the doctors/ nurses here are wrong in anyway, so I don't know where you get the idea.

I've done my hw and rung clinics up. I don't know if you are aware (or whether you have a wife who went through this), but it is not easy to get appointments at OB/GYN and Giessen also has much less OB/GYNs as in Frankfurt. Since I'll be in Frankfurt anyway, I wouldn't mind seeing one there; which is why I'm asking for recommendations.

 

I hope your next post would be more constructive. 

 

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On 5/8/2017, 6:58:09, mavericck said:


If you've got freedom of movement with the Schengen zone, then expect millions of people who don't speak German to be travelling through and also living in Germany who don't speak German (the same applies to Italy, France, Greece, Spain, Denmark, etc.and their respective languages). Also, what is one supposed to do if one finds one's self, as a non-German-speaker, as a patient at a hospital in Germany? Just expect to be treated like a horse?

 

 

Why English? With the UK leaving there are only 2 very small countries within the EU with English as their first language. Since inception, French has been the official language of the EU.

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3 minutes ago, Atrag said:

 

 

Why English? With the UK leaving there are only 2 very small countries within the EU with English as their first language. Since inception, French has been the official language of the EU.

In case you were sleeping for the last 50 years, English is the world's first second language used in science, technology, business. It is the 21st century equivalent of what was in earlier centuries reserved for French or Latin. The only other language so widely spoken as English is Spanish, but due to lesser economic importance of Spanish speaking countries it will not going to replace English in international communication within the next 100 years.

 

Other economic strongholds in Asia use too complicated languages for others to learn (Chinese, Arabic, Japanese), so even within Asia the language of communication is English. And will be.

 

Brexit will not change the fact that most mainland Europeans learn English as their second language, not French or Spanish.

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24 minutes ago, Atrag said:

 

 

Why English? With the UK leaving there are only 2 very small countries within the EU with English as their first language. Since inception, French has been the official language of the EU.


I'm not sure if you've been living under a rock for the last 50 years, but Esperanto is highly unlikely to dethrone the English language as the "world's language" anytime soon.
 

"Through the worldwide influence of the British Empire, modern English spread around the world from the 17th to mid-20th centuries. Through all types of printed and electronic media, as well as the emergence of the United States as the global superpower, English has become the leading language of international discourse and the lingua franca in many regions and in professional contexts such as science, business, commerce, navigation, and law."

"Modern English, sometimes described as the first global lingua franca, is also regarded as the first world language. English is the world's most widely used language in newspaper publishing, book publishing, international telecommunications, scientific publishing, international trade, mass entertainment, and diplomacy. English is, by international treaty, the basis for the required controlled natural languages Seaspeak and Airspeak, used as international languages of seafaring and aviation. English used to have parity with French & German in scientific research, but now it dominates that field. It achieved parity with French as a language of diplomacy at the Treaty of Versailles negotiations in 1919. By the time of the foundation of the United Nations at the end of World War II, English had become pre-eminent and is now the main worldwide language of diplomacy and international relations. It is one of six official languages of the United Nations. Many other worldwide international organizations, including the International Olympic Committee, specify English as a working language or official language of the organization."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language#English_as_a_global_language

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1 hour ago, Atrag said:

 

 

Jeez..this quote system will be the death of me----Atrag: French is not the official language of the EU. It´s ONE of the useful idiot languages of the EU::D People sometimes talk as if all citizens of this and that land are fluent in this or that foreign language. Mostly not. And there is SUCH a difference between being a fluent speaker of a language and a native speaker...

I remember there was a debate in Brussels and the interpreter had to put up with the following:

UK member: that is a case for Norman Wisdom ( a British comedian from the 60s/70s and unknown elsewhere except in Cuba and , I think, Albania ) but , anyway,  I digress:

 

A French-speaking interpreter translated it as " sagesse normande "..and got applause from French delegates..egos massaged and patriotism massaged...:D

 

PS: bloody, bloody quote system...:o

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On 5/9/2017, 3:37:08, optimista said:

In my personal experience of both Singaporians and Germans I would be so bold as to make the following sweeping statement. Singaporians are diametrically oppositely opposed to Germans on the empathy and kindness scale (even moreso than your average Anglo-Saxon, who I imagine the Singaporians perhaps also find rather cold generally?). German healthcare professionals in general are startlingly lacking in empathy. Just seems to be part of the national make-up. Exceptions can always be found. Comments about horses and robots above are spot on.

 

This. I miss Singapore already.

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On 5/8/2017, 2:36:11, Tap said:

One thing is for sure, all dignity goes out the window when having a baby, but you'll get over that when the little bundle is there. 

Lol...so very true. @New in DE, if you can't handle regular obgyn visits now, wait until childbirth. You don't want to hear my horror stories ;-) relax, enjoy the pregnancy, it won't be too long!

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1 hour ago, desdemona said:

Lol...so very true. @New in DE, if you can't handle regular obgyn visits now, wait until childbirth. You don't want to hear my horror stories ;-) relax, enjoy the pregnancy, it won't be too long!

 

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I do wish @New in DE all the best for  imminent babe.

There is a reason nurses specialise- we pick and choose what we like and dislike.  Obs/Gynae is   often chosen by those nurses who do love babies and children. ( Does not mean they love the mums!!)  Those of us who resist the siren call of new babies, often do so because we  prefer to nurse sick people!   Pregnant mums can be very demanding, and   often do not think of this as a natural process.

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