Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Maximum age for apprenticeships?

9 posts in this topic

Hi all, 

I am moving from Azerbaijan to Erlangen in a few months time for my job, and my husband is considering joining me. What worries him is the prospect of quitting his great job and then not finding anything in Germany. 

He is a Turkish citizen (I am Australian), and a trained medical technician. He has vocational diplomas, certification to work with German machinery, and 10 years international experience. BUT no degree.

We know he needs German language skills, so our best case scenario is that he will learn German full time for one year, and then do a study/apprenticeship program with somewhere like Siemens. I am wondering how likely it is that this will go according to plan? Are there age limits for bachelor degrees and apprenticeships (I have looked and can't find any information about ages. He is 31.) What is the job market like for those with language skills and field experience but no degree? 

He will come with me in July to help me get set up in my new apartment. Is there anywhere we could go to get advice for his employment /study prospects? 

 

Thanks for your help! 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not unheard of to do an apprenticeship at that age but it's uncommon.  Most larger companies would prefer younger apprentices who speak good German but they also complain of a lack of suitable apprentices so sometimes if you can't get what you want, you have to take what you can get.  If he finds that he can't get an apprenticeship with a larger employer, he could try a smaller company.  He can surely get a job doing something but finding a job to suit his skills could be a bit more difficult.  If he does find a place willing to give him an apprenticeship, he will not be making very much money during that time.

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a link explaining the outlook for older apprentices and the legal rights (age-discrimination is in principle not allowed)

https://www.azubi.de/beruf/tipps/ausbildung-ueber-30

 

I was listening to a news programme yesterday saying that there is a huge surplus of apprenticeship places in Berlin. Some employers are very welcoming of older starters who bring experience and life skills to the table. (Siemens were mentioned as offering top quality training) I get the impression that Germany has become more flexible in recent years. 

Of course functional German is important, as there is the school side of the qualfication to cover as well as the practical training.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not recommend anybody leaving their home country if they have a great job "for love". Just not worth it IMO. If I look at how much time I have lost, and how my future looks bleak...I would not have done it. IMO its better to learn the language and find a job before moving.

 

I don't know about Germany, but here in Austria if a job requires a degree, work experience alone does not count. They want a degree/certification for everything. Even what would be considered undesirable jobs like retail at minimum wage, they want a kaufmanche study.

 

I don't know about Germany, but here in Austria you need a photo on your resume and if you are not white, chances of an interview become slim to none.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did an intership when I was 34, I have no degree but I did take a nine month course at the Bavarian academy for television 3 years before I started the internship and spoke fluent German since 1987 (I took my Abitur here.)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Girlonfire said:

 

I would not recommend anybody leaving their home country if they have a great job "for love".

 

 

On the other hand, many people find more life satisfaction through their private lives than through their jobs, so then the move would be an investment worth making. If you end up following someone who is not able/prepared to support the family during a period of readjustment, then the move is ill advised.

 

Why do you feel that it would have been better to learn the language and get a job before moving, rather than the other way round? I would have thought that the language learning would be much quicker in the target country. 

 

Germans also do photos on their resumes, and they can then be a source of discrimination.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, kiplette said:

 

On the other hand, many people find more life satisfaction through their private lives than through their jobs, so then the move would be an investment worth making. If you end up following someone who is not able/prepared to support the family during a period of readjustment, then the move is ill advised.

 

Why do you feel that it would have been better to learn the language and get a job before moving, rather than the other way round? I would have thought that the language learning would be much quicker in the target country. 

 

Germans also do photos on their resumes, and they can then be a source of discrimination.

My situation has been that I have been reduced to teaching ESL a couple units here and there. I make pocket money and not a salary as I would like. I wish I had prepared myself better while in my home country and learnt German while there as well as found a job beforehand. Then living here would be more enjoyable.

 

And the Turkish discrimination here in Austria is really bad. Most Turkish people have to fight against being non white and being Muslim. Not speaking German does not help either. I hope its different where you are.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Girlonfire said:

I would not recommend anybody leaving their home country if they have a great job "for love". Just not worth it IMO.

Well in our case we are both already expats - neither of us are living in our home country and neither of us want to stay where we are long term, so at some point we are both going to have to move somewhere :)

 

I am really sorry to hear that it hasn't worked out for you though. I do see your point completely. That's why we are researching and considering lots of options. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. Certainly gives us something to think about. It looks as though an internship might be difficult but at least is possible. 

 

The big decision is whether to do as Girlonfire suggested and stay put while studying the language and finding a job, then join me. Or take the chance and come with me and enrol full time in a German course. I think it makes much more sense to come now, but ultimately it's hubby's decision to make! (and while I'm happy to support him and have the means, he understandably isn't terribly comfortable with the idea) 

 

It's disappointing to hear that it can be difficult for Muslims to get jobs. I had hoped things would be different around Nuremberg with such a big Turkish population, but it seems it's no different to Australia.... 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0