Supermarket throwing out unsold bread

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I was in my local Netto an hour before closing this evening - saw an employee dumping all the unsold bread into a bin. I had heard this happens but when I actually  saw it happen in front of me, it made me really angry. It's not as if the bread was stale - if I had come five minutes earlier, I could have bought a Brotchen or a loaf. 

 

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One time, a REWE employee literally snatched a baguette out of my hand to throw it out. The baguettes had been on the shelf for too long, she had neglected to remove them and she panicked when she saw me grab one and head for the till. I am pretty easy going and don't mind stale bread but I can imagine some people would have come back and complained. It was one of those skinny baguettes that go hard pretty quickly.

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1 hour ago, pmd said:

I was in my local Netto an hour before closing this evening - saw an employee dumping all the unsold bread into a bin. I had heard this happens but when I actually  saw it happen in front of me, it made me really angry. It's not as if the bread was stale - if I had come five minutes earlier, I could have bought a Brotchen or a loaf. 

 

The Tafel food bank that in my area picks up food from both REWE and Netto.  Perhaps there is no Tafel in your area or they have not approached your Netto market.

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All groceries in developed countries do this, or do you think why the food is fresh every day until late evening? Some throw a lot, some less, but this happens.

 

Bigger cities have food sharing volunteers, who collect this food from supermarket and then share among neighbors/others. This is however, quite a work - you need to collect food, then inform people, then answer calls to give it away, and this every day.

 

If you want more than complaining, you can join food sharing organization in your town, or even start one yourself.

 

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I think there are rules on this in the UK, and the shops get fined for throwing stuff out, so it is actually cheaper for them to sell something for 30c than it is to chuck it out. Tesco does a brilliant reduced area in the fridge which goes down as the day rolls on, proper granny elbow fighting starts up - bread section too. I loved it. We tried out new weird things, and supper was a mystery tour quite often, when you went in for a pack of bacon and came out with 2 bags of scallops for 10p or whatever. 

 

Them were the days...

 

Rewe has caught on, but I am I think the only customer who is not embarrassed to buy the reduced items - even the quite grumpy cashier commented yesterday that all but one item had a sticker (mostly only 30% off, bit crap) in an impressed way. Kid#4 had spotted Softbrod for 50c, teach 'em young...

 

Last week, going through Jolly, Traditionally-Built cashier's till, I realised as she started on the customer in front that one of my three packs of fresh carbonara sauce for 20c had burst over her laufband and the rest of my shopping. Luckily she had kitchen roll handy and found the whole thing proper funny, as we both found more sauce here and there.

 

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20 minutes ago, yourkeau said:

All groceries in developed countries do this, or do you think why the food is fresh every day until late evening? Some throw a lot, some less, but this happens.

 

Bigger cities have food sharing volunteers, who collect this food from supermarket and then share among neighbors/others. This is however, quite a work - you need to collect food, then inform people, then answer calls to give it away, and this every day.

 

If you want more than complaining, you can join food sharing organization in your town, or even start one yourself.

 

I am talking specifically about bread, not food in general. 

 

To reiterate, I was fully aware that it happens.

 

Why can't I complain and have a moan about it? 

 

Finallt, thanks for your response, it was somewhat informative. 

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46 minutes ago, rodisi said:

The Tafel food bank that in my area picks up food from both REWE and Netto.  Perhaps there is no Tafel in your area or they have not approached your Netto market.

Thanks for the info, I appreciate it!

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Well, of course you can :)

 

Not all bread is spoiled quickly, but the one I like most is barely eatable after 24 hours, so if bought fresh it should be consumed the same day or next morning at the latest. I believe thrown bread goes to compost, so it's not wasted.

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Sorry yorkeau, I know you were only trying to inform me, apologies for my pissedoffedness.

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In oooo Great rich Bavaria things are done very different way. One supermarket chain doesn't throw anything but sells the goods which are out of date no problem. The only difference is that they have small orange stickers cowardly/prickerly put on bread from bottom, and if you don't see that it's REDUZIERT, and then see that the date goes back a few day in the past, you can do nothing once you bought it. Some months ago, I had a serious fight with manager of the shitty bavarian supermarket who was supporting this kind of illegal activities.

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I remember seeing something about this on TV a while ago in regards to bakeries and the Tagel.

In many parts of Germany there is something in the tax laws that if a baker throws out bread he pays no tax but if he gives away the bread to the Tafel then he has to still pay some tax on it.

This may be out of date by now or may be just a load of bollocks that I have totally falsely remembered.

7 hours ago, stormwatch said:

The only difference is that they have small orange stickers cowardly/prickerly put on bread from bottom, and if you don't see that it's REDUZIERT, and then see that the date goes back a few day in the past, you can do nothing once you bought it. Some months ago, I had a serious fight with manager of the shitty bavarian supermarket who was supporting this kind of illegal activities.

Bakers round here but especially supermarkets always have a bin with yesterdays bread in it which they sell cheap and it is well marked as bread from yesterday.

I have never seen a shop here sell out of date foodstuffs and tbh I didn't think they were actually allowed to do that nowadays.

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9 hours ago, pmd said:

Sorry yorkeau, I know you were only trying to inform me, apologies for my pissedoffedness.

No problem. Was a misunderstanding.

 

8 hours ago, stormwatch said:

In oooo Great rich Bavaria things are done very different way. One supermarket chain doesn't throw anything but sells the goods which are out of date no problem. The only difference is that they have small orange stickers cowardly/prickerly put on bread from bottom, and if you don't see that it's REDUZIERT, and then see that the date goes back a few day in the past, you can do nothing once you bought it. Some months ago, I had a serious fight with manager of the shitty bavarian supermarket who was supporting this kind of illegal activities.

In less so rich Franconia the Reduziert labels apply to products expiring tomorrow. But maybe you are right, I will check if they also sell expired products.

 

Technically this is legal because MHD doesn't mean the product cannot be consumed, but by selling these products they are liable for possible food poisonings. And insurance will not pay.

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There used to be(?) a shop in my hometown where you could buy Backwaren von gestern (IIRC that was even the name of the shop). You could get loaves of bread, Danish pastries, Zwiebelkuchen, cake, Hefezopf, etc. for less than half price. It was really popular, sometimes the queue would be out the door. All the shops belonging to a local chain would deliver their goods and nothing was wasted. Must check if the shop is still there next time I visit my parents.

For good number of years there was a second shop belonging to a different local chain that was just as popular, people would queue up outside before it opened at 10 am. But then again, maybe that's just Swabians for you :lol:

 

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I thought that some places cut up the old bread, bag it and sell it on as Knödelbrot. There are bags of this in almost every shop.

 

That's what we do with all of our end pieces or half eaten Brezen, etc. and keep it in the freezer for the next Knödel making.

 

We also slice our fresh bread, whether bought or homemade, bag it and put in the freezer. Himself just takes a slice out each day (I don't eat bread) and pops it in the toaster oven for 2 minutes to thaw out and then puts his butter, cheese and processed meats on it.

2 hours ago, yourkeau said:

but by selling these products they are liable for possible food poisonings. And insurance will not pay.

 

I don't think that one can get poisoned from day or two old bread.

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3 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

I don't think that one can get poisoned from day or two old bread.

Normally yes, but once I discovered mold on a bread. Depending on one's health, it can cause bad effects. I am not a medical person, though.

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15 minutes ago, keroleen said:

There used to be(?) a shop in my hometown where you could buy Backwaren von gestern (IIRC that was even the name of the shop).

 

There are shops like this in Karlsruhe and in Goeppingen (Kauderers Cleverle, Marktstr. 3) and Hamburg and many more cities.

 

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7 minutes ago, keroleen said:

Ah, maybe you know, @someonesdaughter: Is the shop still on Weibermarkt (behind the Marienkirche)? :)

 

"Altbrotladen" – I'm not sure, need to check when I'm 'downtown' next time. 

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Our local supermarket actually appears to sling the bread in the rubish bin... but its actually collected by the local vets that mix it with other food for the animals in the area... 

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