Why do you want to send your children to private school in Germany?

84 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, topcat 1 said:

This is all a bit of bollocks tbh.

 

Please don't talk about your bollocks, fella. It's too much information here on Toytown. :o

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9 hours ago, PandaMunich said:

You don't have to convince me of the merit of engineering ;)

I had an 1.0 Abitur and could have studied anything I wanted and still chose engineering :D

 

9 hours ago, PandaMunich said:

Taxes are my hobby

 

Our Panda is a genius. :)

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"... simply cannot speak English...If I magically dropped them in Manchester they would not survive.

 

I can empathise, despite being here ten years, and trying to speak German I am always answered in pigeon English. I acquiesce, speak English and then they cannot understand me..."

 

There is that whole thing.

 

I learned my German largely from books and some exceptionally good teachers and fellow students in the UK, following the example of European English parents who spoke great French and bad German ;-)

 

Coming here for work I found I just needed to pick up the workaday formulas and mannerisms and I could pass for a typical German pretty quickly. There's a weird working life jargon in the UK and USA too.

 

Now I appreciate the bilingual primary schooling because languages, especially English, are living things, you don't just pick them up as high school subjects.

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Portugal has mandatory English lessons from 1st grade till 11th grade. Not bilingual, forced Portuguese and English.

 

Like it or not, English is the business/travel/programming/international language. I don't advocate bilingual teaching, I advocate local language + English.

I don't think state should pay for bilingual classes where Portuguese or Arabic is taught. Second language should be English, period.

If parents want a third language, they should pay for it.

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24 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

Portugal has mandatory English lessons from 1st grade till 11th grade. Not bilingual, forced Portuguese and English.

 

Like it or not, English is the business/travel/programming/international language. I don't advocate bilingual teaching, I advocate local language + English.

I don't think state should pay for bilingual classes where Portuguese or Arabic is taught. Second language should be English, period.

If parents want a third language, they should pay for it.

 

In Gymnasium here, you have to do 2 foreign languages, and in many Realschule you can opt for it.     My daughter did 3.  Why should I have to pay for this?  All the state bilingual  schools I have looked at, English is also compulsory, at least to year 10/11.

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19 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

 

In Gymnasium here, you have to do 2 foreign languages, and in many Realschule you can opt for it.     My daughter did 3.  Why should I have to pay for this?  All the state bilingual  schools I have looked at, English is also compulsory, at least to year 10/11.

The scope of my statement was grundschüle and bilingual, not trilingual in Gymnasium.

 

We also have to 2 compulsory foreign languages (everybody!), but English must be one of them. And the 3rd language is only compulsory from the 5th till the 9th grade, compared to English, which goes from 1st till 11th grade.

Although you can choose the 3rd language, in practice you are limited to French and very rarely, to Spanish.
 

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Back to the main topic.

 

Many families move to Germany for 2 - 4 yr. job assignments and don't think it is worth putting their children through trying to fit in and learn at German schools, especially if the children are young. Private schools may be the best choice for them. There were many kids at BIS when my son was there who were just "passing through". They all managed to leave speaking and writing in German and many continued German back in their home countries. A lot of companies paid their tuition.

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27 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Back to the main topic.

 

Many families move to Germany for 2 - 4 yr. job assignments and don't think it is worth putting their children through trying to fit in and learn at German schools, especially if the children are young. Private schools may be the best choice for them. There were many kids at BIS when my son was there who were just "passing through". They all managed to leave speaking and writing in German and many continued German back in their home countries. A lot of companies paid their tuition.

 

This is the normal route here in Frankfurt.

 

after a year here I was #really# tired of being asked "are you still here?"

 

I guess many people would consider me naive for buying the European dream of actually belonging in Europe.

 

we came here intending to stay indefinitely, and even with all the political garbage, that's still plan A.

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On 1.3.2017, 10:39:56, MikeMelga said:

I think BIS average was also around 34-35, I can check it at home. Unsure why you don't find it that impressive, as the global IB average is around 30.

 

For reference - a score of 34 on IB is equal to a 2.3 Abitur.

 

I.e. their results are somewhat similar to, possibly slightly worse than public Gymnasiums (as should be expected).

The minimum 4.0 Abitur grade is equal to a a 24 score IB, that 30 score "global IB average" is a 3.0 Abitur.

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@PandaMunich: Does It matter if Abitur is from Hessen or Bw State?

or from a private school?

planning for a private Gymnasium with G9 for my child moving from an international school with little German.Pondering on Goethe (But g8)in Bensheim or EI (G9)Heidelberg!

any advice?

much appreciated

thanks

 

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The Abitur is a state exam, which is set by each Bundesland individually, no matter whether the child attended a public or private school before sitting this state exam. 

Universities do not care from which Bundesland the Abitur is, they only care about the mark - which isn't very fair, since the Abitur in some Bundesländer is much easier than in others

What percentage of pupils in a year manages to get the Abitur, the Bundesländer with higher percentages have an "easier" Abitur (source):

5a861fe002589_Screenshot2018-02-16at01.0

 

Bavaria and the East-German Bundesländer have very high standards in the Gymnasium, so only the best pupils actually survive the Gymnasium to get to the Abitur, which means that best&brightest pupils from these Bundesländer end up getting better results (= better marks, i.e. nearer to the best mark 1.0) even though the Abitur in these Bundesländer is harder than in the other Bundesländer, please see the round chart from here:

58b69d0ea3724_2017-03-0111_05_24-DERSPIE

 

 

1 hour ago, tanindia said:

planning for a private Gymnasium with G9 for my child moving from an international school with little German

 

However, you should also consider is that putting a child with little German into a Gymnasium is very ambitious - you are looking at additional high expenditure every month for a German tutor to bring your child's German up to par, please see here for @emkay's experience:

 

You may profit from reading the following threads in their entirety, to understand why in Germany an expensive private school that is only "staatlich genehmigt" (for an explanation of what that is, read my answer in the first thread below) is the exact opposite of a British private school (= Public school):

  • in a British Public (= private) school you pay high school fees so that your child will learn more than in a UK state school.
  • in Germany, it's the other way round, you pay high fees to a "staatlich genehmigte" school so that your child isn't pestered by being obliged to learn something.

To be fair, a "staatlich anerkannte" school, like, for example, the schools run by the Catholic church, are the complete equivalent of the state schools, i.e. there your child will get an education, just like in a state school:

and:

and:

Regarding G8 or G9, the East-German Bundesländer have always been G8 and have had success, while Bavaria has abandoned the experiment with G8 and has returned to G9: http://www.zeit.de/gesellschaft/schule/2017-04/abitur-bayern-g9-reform-wiedereinfuehrung

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9 hours ago, tanindia said:

@PandaMunich: Does It matter if Abitur is from Hessen or Bw State?

or from a private school?

planning for a private Gymnasium with G9 for my child moving from an international school with little German.Pondering on Goethe (But g8)in Bensheim or EI (G9)Heidelberg!

any advice?

much appreciated

thanks

 

 

Wait, why would you move a child who doesn't speak German into an exclusively German-language school at this late stage?!

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I assume you have lived a very sheltered life and you never struggled with harsh reality. I can tell you a gazillion reasons why someone might have to take such move, the obvious one would be, the person comes from a third world country, came here with a good expat package which included education for the kids in a private international school. Now things changed, the person lost the job, the company is cutting expenses, the school is only a primary school and there is no alternative or the company does not pay for the alternative, etc. The person can't afford to pay a private school from his own pocket, so they have to either put the kid in a normal school or go back to their third world country, but time has passed and the kid would actually struggle even more over there, and a struggle in Germany is first world problems compared to struggling over there.

I don't know man, I am just guessing. Do you think the person wants to put his own kid through that struggle just for fun?

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