Why do you want to send your children to private school in Germany?

84 posts in this topic

Just a practicality. They are already bilingual (well, trilingual but let's keep it simple) and only the "private" schools continue this in a meaningful way (I put "private" in quotes because compared to the UK it's so incredibly cheap there's no real comparison in English - and I assume e.g. USA is even more alien).

 

Once we checked them out it emerged that one of them has a really nice model of education and offers IB, so, plus they are German run and have that nice sense of a decent amount of order, not so chaotic as some Anglosphere schools I checked out, so what's not to love?

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Is the private school "staatlich anerkannt" or only "staatlich genehmigt"?

 

For an explanation of what these terms mean, please see in here:

 

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5 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

My son came here with no German and his dad's company paid for it. They also had IB program. No brainer.

Don't you end up paying taxes and social security on that?

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8 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

Is the private school "staatlich anerkannt" or only "staatlich genehmigt"?

 

For an explanation of what these terms mean, please see in here:

Is there some other good website reference for these categories other than Toytown? :-D

 

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11 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

Is the private school "staatlich anerkannt" or only "staatlich genehmigt"?

 

For an explanation of what these terms mean, please see in here:

 

 

If they offer Abitur and/or IB, isn't that fine? German vocational schools and/or universities will accept an Abi or an IB, right?

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An IB will only be accepted for entry into university if the child has done a certain combination of subjects, for details please see here: http://www.kmk.org/fileadmin/Dateien/pdf/ZAB/Hochschulzugang_Beschluesse_der_KMK/IB_Diploma_11.pdf

 

And how do know whether that school can really keep its promises of getting your child to reach the IB?

Do they have a record, i.e. how many of their pupils have already passed the IB?

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4 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

And how do know whether that school can really keep its promises of getting your child to reach the IB?

Do they have a record, i.e. how many of their pupils have already passed the IB?

 

Can you expand on this? How would you rank BIS or MIS on this subject?

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11 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

An IB will only be accepted for entry into university if the child has done a certain combination of subjects, for details please see here: http://www.kmk.org/fileadmin/Dateien/pdf/ZAB/Hochschulzugang_Beschluesse_der_KMK/IB_Diploma_11.pdf

 

And how do know whether that school can really keep its promises of getting your child to reach the IB?

Do they have a record, i.e. how many of their pupils have already passed the IB?

 

That standard doesn't seem very tough.

 

Never rely on a school to "get your child to do X". Parents are the ones responsible for their kids' education.

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35 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

Don't you end up paying taxes and social security on that?

 

His dad worked and lived in Shanghai at the time.

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1 hour ago, MikeMelga said:

Can you expand on this? How would you rank BIS or MIS on this subject?

 

You would have to ask them.

 

I couldn't find anything on the IB statistics on the BIS web site.

 

On the MIS web site, I could just find a short mention of a 34.5 average IB score:

58b6935c5bc75_2017-03-0110_23_58-Home_Mu

 

Which, since the maximum score in the IB is 45 points, doesn't sound that impressive to me.

 

For overall IB statistics (from 2014) please see this document: http://www.ibo.org/contentassets/bc850970f4e54b87828f83c7976a4db6/may-2014-stats-bulletin.pdf

 

****************************************************************************

 

The problem is if a child wants to go to university in Germany: if that child finished school in Germany, he/she doesn't get one of the reserved places for people with non-German schooling, but competes for places with German pupils.

 

For example, in Munich the numerus clausus (= the mark a pupil has to have to get into the course) for medicine is 1.1 (with 1.0 being the best possible mark, and the last mark with which you still pass the Abitur being 4.0): http://www.target-medizin.de/bewerbung/nc-uebersicht-medizin.html

 

For the statistics of how many pupils reach the mark 1.0 in the Abitur in Germany, please see here: http://www.spiegel.de/lebenundlernen/schule/abitur-in-deutschland-hier-haben-schueler-die-besten-noten-a-1063405.html

 

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So, my school's website uses the phrases "staatlich genehmigt' and "staatlich anerkannt" at different points... is it possible a school can be both?

 

Is there really a black and white cut-off here? Is there a source other than Toytown to refer to on this question?

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Well, here's the updated link to article from the Bayerischer Rundfunk from which I cited in the other thread: http://www.br.de/themen/wissen/privatschule-privatschulen-schulen-100.html

 

And if you want a state source explaining the difference, here's the state of Saxony with its web site: http://www.schule.sachsen.de/1786.htm

 

7 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

So, my school's website uses the phrases "staatlich genehmigt' and "staatlich anerkannt" at different points... is it possible a school can be both?

 

Yes, for example, their Grundschule (= elementary school) may be staatlich anerkannt, but when it gets to the nitty gritty of secondary school (Realschule, Gymnasium) they may only be staatlich genehmigt.

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5 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

I couldn't find anything on the IB statistics on the BIS web site.

 

On the MIS web site, I could just find a short mention of a 34.5 average IB score:

58b6935c5bc75_2017-03-0110_23_58-Home_Mu

 

Which, since the maximum score in the IB is 45 points, doesn't sound that impressive to me.

 

I think BIS average was also around 34-35, I can check it at home. Unsure why you don't find it that impressive, as the global IB average is around 30.

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7 minutes ago, sos-the-rope said:

So, my school's website uses the phrases "staatlich genehmigt' and "staatlich anerkannt" at different points... is it possible a school can be both?

 

Is there really a black and white cut-off here? Is there a source other than Toytown to refer to on this question?

 

Yes its possible.  With a new school, it obviously takes a while for children to work through to final classes.  Here is an article about Phorms:

 

http://www.taunus-zeitung.de/lokales/hochtaunus/vordertaunus/Phorms-Gymnasium-ist-jetzt-anerkannt;art48711,1584946

 

So the children reaching final Abitur exams in 2018 will be taking their exams in another school, and have to have extra exams too.

 

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24 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

I think BIS average was also around 34-35, I can check it at home. Unsure why you don't find it that impressive, as the global IB average is around 30.

 

Because I see no reason to pay 18,000€ a year (source) at MIS for something you can have for free at a state school.

The IB has no advantage over the Abitur, the Abitur gives you worldwide access to all universities.

 

And a 1.0 in Germany means that you had to have more than 95% in all subjects.

What mark in the IB system corresponds to 95%?

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