Do you like living in Germany?

361 posts in this topic

The unpleasantness and officiousness might be partly a generational thing. Most young folk seem friendly and humorous, and the fact that it's frumpy middle aged people who are rude and shouty makes it all the more weird, as they would normally be the ones you expect to be polite and professional.

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1 hour ago, grimmiger said:

[...] and the fact that it's frumpy middle aged people who are rude and shouty [...]

You called ?

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I have mixed feelings about Germany.  I don't plan to stay here forever.  I plan either to go Switzerland or east eventually but comparing Germany to Canada (Toronto in my case), it's obvious the country has some advantages and disadvantages.

 

Advantages:

- It's easier to find a job in Germany than in Toronto, at least for the time being.  Since all immigrants want to come to Toronto, it's makes the job market extremely competitive.

- Jobs are more secure.  I never was a fan of this firing for fun attitude which seems to be somewhat an obsession in North America.

- Better public transportation

- Closer to the Mediterranean

- Mild winters (I hate snow)

- Beautiful spring

- I prefer the German direct no BS attitude to the caker smiley face but stab you in the back attitude.

 

Disadvantages

- Taxes are too high

- Everything has a "3 month notice" period

- Apartments and houses come without kitchens (mostly in certain regions).  My first reaction was WTF?

- Lack of freedom of speech

- Buying a house or even a condo is a lot more difficult than in Canada

- Huge housing shortage

- Non-existent summer

- Too many extremes in politics.  Everyday country has its fanatics but how do the Linke get so much suppor?

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Been here 9 months so far, the jury is still out, in my opinion Berlin is not all it is cracked up to be.

 

Having moved here from Moscow, so far I have to say that I prefer Moscow in almost every way--from the people to the restaurants to the cityscape, even the weather (cold crisp snowy winters instead of the grey drizzle in Berlin).  

 

My next move will probably be back to the US, but I'll stay in Berlin as long as I can stand it.

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12 minutes ago, J0ker said:

- I prefer the German direct no BS attitude to the caker smiley face but stab you in the back attitude.

 

Ha! You nailed one of the bad aspects of our culture there with that one!  Even so, took me a while to work out that our way of speaking in code by beating around the bush just annoys the hell out of the Germans, and doesn't get you anywhere here. 

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1 hour ago, grimmiger said:

The unpleasantness and officiousness might be partly a generational thing. Most young folk seem friendly and humorous, and the fact that it's frumpy middle aged people who are rude and shouty makes it all the more weird, as they would normally be the ones you expect to be polite and professional.

 

Generalisations and offensiveness throughout:

 

I would agree with this. There seems to be a line around 45 years old. Older = dick. Younger = OK.

 

I have experience of Saarland, Baden-Württemberg and now Bayern. Whilst there are regional differences for me it always comes down to individual versus collective. I have many great German friends from each place, and most individuals I meet are lovely. But as a collective they come across as rude and grumpy. i.e. shit service, arsehole drivers, shopping is painful etc.

 

But I found the same in America too. Individually all lovely but the collective culture I really didn't like.

 

So I think my dislikes are the same as most. People, food, shopping variety, driving, TV and in Munich, the living situation and no sea. Which, although they seem like major fundamental things, I can live with. I have great friends, great job, lots going on, GREAT beer, living in central Europe and it's safe...so safe. The most aggressive drunk I have encountered is probably me (embarrassingly).

 

I still say "back in the UK it's not like this". But I've been here nearly 8 years now and I don't think the UK I know exists anymore anyway.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Joanie said:
7 hours ago, Joanie said:

 

Sunny baden is apparently the place to be if you want warm and relaxed germans, so be careful not to group German people all into one sack!

 

 

Very true. Astounded to find how polite and friendly the Baden-Würtemburger are after years in Munich. Completely different breed.

 

6 hours ago, Joanie said:

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, theGman said:

 

 

 

I would agree with this. There seems to be a line around 45 years old. Older = dick. Younger = OK.

 

 

 

My experience is this:

 

Under 30:  generally ok, but sometimes too know-it-all AND naive 

between 30 and 45: 50/50 change of dickery

45-50:  definitely dicks

50-60:  dealers choice

over 60: very lovely, funny, warm and friendly. 

 

Since we are generalizing. :D

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16 minutes ago, Joanie said:

over 60: very lovely, funny, warm and friendly. 

That's the SS generation trying to maintain a low profile.

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ich liebe berlin

 

hoping to move bac to berlin this year or next

 

i'd prefer to live way out the countryside , maybe get a small piece of land, a tractor, a few dogs

 

fav thing about germany is the people and the beer

 

least fav thing is  , actually no complaints i can think of

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45 minutes ago, rasperktos said:

i'd prefer to live way out the countryside , maybe get a small piece of land, a tractor, a few dogs

 

Whilst not wishing to state the obvious, I think you'd find life in Brandenburg very different to life in Berlin...not the city/country difference but the attitudes to outsiders. Of course YMMV, especially if you don't look too different to the natives. Just saying.

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17 minutes ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

@sneaker Some people have problems with mathematics, so I will do it for you:

2017 - 60 = 1957 I did not know that the war ended 1957.

 

A guy who served in the SS and was 20 at the end of the war was born 1925.

He would be 92 now! Or most probably dead and buried. May be that#s what you call low profile.

 

Sneaker's comment still made me chuckle though.  Maybe its the former Stasi, trying to keep a low profile, or people hiding from the Stasi. 

 

My kid's music teacher was in Hitler Youth.  For all he went through as a child, he was the friendliest best german I ever met.  Although he has a few mental issues regarding his parents (they were ardent Nazis).  

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I have been living in Munich for 1.5 years now and before coming here I lived in Leeds for about 5 years. Still I am frustrated with some of the systems in Germany, few things which were so easy in UK are bit tough here. For first 6 months I was even thinking to move back to UK. However, now I feel like Munich is a good city to live and one has lots of things to explore here-


 

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I've been here for 2 years. I really enjoy the food, bier, summer here. 

The people are quite okay, and I have friendly neighbours. It really depends where you live as my last town Wasserburg was quite touristy and I think because of that the people are very unfriendly there. And my neighbours would never talk or say hi, or anything.

Ebersberg is not so touristy, and so for example if you go to a restaurant they will assume your a local and treat you as such. I think this vibe rubs off on people in general, and it's pretty normal (or at least to strange) to say 'servus' to somebody passing in the street.

 

I have no plan to go back to Australia yet. I don't really care for the beach, I like the Alps much more.

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37 minutes ago, kiplette said:

Cheating, managed to find my old post on this theme, still feel the same.

 

Red squirrels.

Teenagers waiting for the Green Man.

Kids walking/biking to school.

The possibility of spotting a wild boar in the woods. The woods that stretch on and on (from a UK perspective).

Strong social contract.

Trains that are clean and run on time. The fact that most Germans seem to think DBahn is crap. Hello?

Not having the car nicked regularly (previously lived in Sunderland).

Posh people using local schools.

Oldies out on their zimmers and trikes until they drop dead.

Sausages with meat in. Surprisingly delicious.

Landlust magazine.

Christmas markets. The gorgeous ones and the local tatty ones.

Bulk rubbish.

 

Couldn't make the quotation magically appear from one ancient pre-Change thread to this one. Probably my ineptitude, but I will blame it on the Change.

I went to Uni in Sunderland and while I was there (1997-2003) SR1 and SR2 were the two highest category areas for House insurance in the country.
The guy at my insurance said that they assume that your house will be broken in to and your car will b stolen or damaged.

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There are good and bad. I spent a large portion of my life living in Singapore, and I couldn't help comparing the two most of the times.

For starters, Germany has better work life balance. In Singapore we talked about work life Balance all the time but the fact is people (at least I) worked until midnight every so often until I dropped out of burnout. Granted, I was single when I was working in Singapore, perhaps that's why they thought it's ok to exploit me to the last drop. But my married colleagues weren't much better off either.

Here they walk the talk. I could really clock off at 5pm to be on time for dinner with my family. And I could even work part time, do regular home office and take long parental leave, all so that my family don't suffer. That's probably one thing that I appreciate the most here. Plus the much longer holiday.

The food, however, is much better in Singapore or elsewhere in Asia than here. Of course, who am I kidding? You love the food you grow up with. But in general the variety of spices, fresh seafood and culinary creativity make Asian food taste better than the food here. 

I've been living here for more than 7 years and have developed local circle of friends, but it can't compare with the kind of familiarity and closeness with friends I grew up with. Sadly after many years overseas, I've also realised that my old friends have drifted away and the bond that we have is only part of my nostalgia. It makes me feel rather lonely to think about it.

My husband is my only close friend now. Well, as it should be I guess.

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8 hours ago, desdemona said:

There are good and bad. I spent a large portion of my life living in Singapore, and I couldn't help comparing the two most of the times.

For starters, Germany has better work life balance. In Singapore we talked about work life Balance all the time but the fact is people (at least I) worked until midnight every so often until I dropped out of burnout. Granted, I was single when I was working in Singapore, perhaps that's why they thought it's ok to exploit me to the last drop. But my married colleagues weren't much better off either.

Here they walk the talk. I could really clock off at 5pm to be on time for dinner with my family. And I could even work part time, do regular home office and take long parental leave, all so that my family don't suffer. That's probably one thing that I appreciate the most here. Plus the much longer holiday.

The food, however, is much better in Singapore or elsewhere in Asia than here. Of course, who am I kidding? You love the food you grow up with. But in general the variety of spices, fresh seafood and culinary creativity make Asian food taste better than the food here. 

I've been living here for more than 7 years and have developed local circle of friends, but it can't compare with the kind of familiarity and closeness with friends I grew up with. Sadly after many years overseas, I've also realised that my old friends have drifted away and the bond that we have is only part of my nostalgia. It makes me feel rather lonely to think about it.

My husband is my only close friend now. Well, as it should be I guess.

 

Very nice post. Thank you.

 

On 1/18/2017, 1:55:23, john_b said:

In the 18 months since returning we occasionally wondered whether we were being blinded by a nostalgic memory of how it used to be back in the early 90's, but have managed to resettle very happily. Also in our 9 year absence the overall quality of restaurants in Berlin improved significantly.

 

Thank you for saying this. I worry most that I'm returning out of nostalgia and not accurate memories.

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