Do you like living in Germany?

361 posts in this topic

25 minutes ago, sneaker said:

In 1949, the Free State of Bavaria chose not to sign the Founding Treaty (Gründungsvertrag) for the formation of the Federal Republic of Germany, opposing the division of Germany into two states, after World War II. The Bavarian Parliament did not sign the Basic Law of Germany, mainly because it was seen as not granting sufficient powers to the individual Länder, but at the same time decided that it would still come into force in Bavaria if two-thirds of the other Länder ratified it. All of the other Länder ratified it, and so it became law.

 

Source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bavaria#20th_century

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Bavaria already had own Constitution back then (since 1946).

http://www.gesetze-bayern.de/Content/Document/BayVerf?AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

 

Just because it was adopted before German constitution it still has interesting articles that „German citizens have the same rights and obligations as Bavarian citizens.“ However, the law about Bavarian citizenship was never adopted because the GG came into force in 1949 making these articles obsolete.

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Things that are better here than home:

 

- really mild winters here, if you can call them that at all.

- pedestrian streets

- food generally, especially bread, cheese and beer (the real fourth food group)

- cities that have an end to them, sprawl isn't nearly as bad here

- cities that are more or less attractive, or at least have attractive parts to them.  We've got some too, but most are either boring or flat-out ugly

- a commitment to renewable energy

- returnable bottle system for everything

- crazy number of field and forest paths, so going for a walk in the country doesn't entail sneaking along an 80 kmh road with no shoulder, or driving 80 or 100 kms to a conservation area or other wilderness area.

- bike infrastructure

- right before left intersections, once you get used to them, beats having to stop every 100m

- roundabouts (their existence)

- obviously public transit

- trucks are better, I always had pick-ups at home, here I've got a Doka Pritschenwagen, way more practical, way more payload, and 10L diesel per 100km.

- garden spades have a longer handle - if you use one often, you notice how cool that is!

- oh yeah, paid vacation and holidays, first time in my life I got either was here in Germany

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I find the winter really difficult to take after spending the last 3 years in Spain. Generally I find the people colder and harder to socialise with too. On the plus side, for a variety of reasons my future here seems more certain and stable here. I'm hoping in time I will grow to love it.

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I really loved my 25 years in Germany. Always felt safe. I´m still " in the German system ": company ,postal address,  tax, Chamber of Commerce, (ignoring GEZ letters, though!!:lol:). Made many friends, still have many friends.

 

I´ve been on Crete for three years and feel safe here, too! (So far..).

I appreciate the way Germans are pretty organised in general (I´m pretty chaotic, to be honest , so I feel at home in Greece mostly ).

Bloody, bloody, bloody weather...sorry, babes, Crete wins and wins big.

 

BUT I will return to Germany for several months a year soonish, health permitting. I need to keep up my relationships there..miss some people. That´s the biggie... plus .let´s see what all this Brexit stuff does...the Greeks won´t even bother me  that much, I doubt...I could be a tourist!!!:D

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We came here at the end of 2012, we moved to a small town in the Pfalz that could be called parochial but I love it here. The UK now is not the country I grew up in, people have become more selfish there, it's more about what what you have than who you are, being accepted in a different area to where you come from seems to be more difficult, trying to get your child into a decent school seems to depend on how much you can afford to pay for a house or how well you play the church system if you want your child to attend a C of E school. Life seems to be more shallow and choice is limited. Food shopping, you have to go to one of the major supermarkets, just about every town centre has the same brands, Boots, Greggs, God knows how many mobile phone or charity shops, Wetherspoons and Waterstones. No real choice, just drab.

 

Here, we were accepted near enough straight away, people are so friendly and helpful. Schooling here is definately based on ability not wealth or who you know. Weather if anything I've found the summer too hot, I'm more of a winter person. I feel safe walking around the town, there is not a proliferation of secutity cameras watching your every movement so you can still be fairly anonymous. Public transport is fantastic (compared to what we had in the UK), Here there are around 6 different bakers in the town centre, the only major brands are Muller, DM, C&A and H&M, the majority of shops are small independents.

 

What I don't like is the amount of beggers - I have to work, why can't they. The local Verwaltung in this particular town definately doesn't score highly for friendliness, like everywhere some of the rules and regulations need time to get use to. After 4 years though I'm still not homesick, doubt if I ever will be.

 

It's as if in the UK people value money, here they value people.

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my humble opinion:

 

First have in mind, that difference regions of Germany have different mentalities.

 

I live in Munich ,so this focus on Munich area. 

The worse i find here is actually the people, like many said...

i have to say it twice:

The worse is the people! 

 

People can be grumpy and snobbish here. Cold and unfriendly. Not sociable. 

and sociable is not for me to go a get full of bier one weekend and than not to have any contact till next beer event. 

 

 

People can also be strange in the point they care more about your job.

e.g German people here, before asking my name or where i come from,... they ask me where i work.

 

 

winter is really shit here! its dark very dark, and gray all the time, clouds behave like low altitude fog. always gray.

snow i like, but when it rains....bad again

winter is... depressive.

Munich its even worse for weather,, because there is some kind of weather circulation from the alps that gives people a lot of headaches, dizziness, problems with blood circulation and gives bad mood due to feeling uncomfortable. 

 

Houses are quite small. i hate it...

plus quality of construction is very bad.  

i don consider that quality of life at all.

 i was living  in one room apartment, and i really hated. ..but that is standard here. 

 

and somehow there is a lack of quality in everything (even food ) and very low costumer service for anything.

 but before was worse, much, much worse.i saw a lot of improvements. 

 

good things:

...hm...i have a job here now. if its good paid for German standards...or maybe not...who knows.  

..there are many foreigners here. its interesting to see all the different nationalities. 

(worse is when they get germanized) 

there is Oktoberfest. during that period, all Germans are in happy mood. everybody is happy, smiling, everything is allowed!yeahhh! 

summer time is nice. finally sun!!! ..but than it rains a lot, and there are many clouds too. (that is not good) 

there are biergartens in summer ..(have to drink bier to be happy...lol) 

 

i miss: the ocean, a lot 

the ocean air, fresh light air. very different from Munich. its heavy air. cant really explain it well. 

i miss a good summer, hot.

i miss seeing a lot of people in a real good mood uncomplicated and relaxed, like in any southern country i have been.

i miss seeing happy faces.

i miss seeing happy faces and smiles in the subway!

i miss be able to speak my mind freely. ...here people judge everything. 

i miss the feeling of feeling home and welcomed.

 

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, GER308 said:

I don"t get the whole Germans are unfriendly... I have made great friends here, friends I can actually count on. 

 

Totally agree. My German friends are the ones that have lasted 20 years. Americans...nope.

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2 hours ago, john_b said:

In the 18 months since returning we occasionally wondered whether we were being blinded by a nostalgic memory of how it used to be back in the early 90's, but have managed to resettle very happily. Also in our 9 year absence the overall quality of restaurants in Berlin improved significantly.

 

Thank you for saying this. I worry most that I'm returning out of nostalgia and not accurate memories.

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1 hour ago, jauburn said:

 

 

 

Thank you for saying this. I worry most that I'm returning out of nostalgia and not accurate memories.

I am worried about the same thing.  I'm making my plans to move, and excited but terrified at the same time.  

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Cough, cough, humm,

Not:

Weather, unfriendly people, red tape, weather, weather, people that scream at you for not following the rules but than the do the same, everything is Verboten, no beach, I'm from California and Florida, I use to run every morning on the beach now I ran in the snow haha!, go to pay for water in restaurants, lack of good food I'm Mexican American give a brake, we are the king of tacos, nachos etc... 

 

Yes: Beautiful country, tons of bike pads, medical care I had a 2.5 hour surgery last week, total cost with ambulance 70.00 big ones, we get a month's vacation.

For me, you have to look at it as who gets the benefits other than yourself.

 

 My wife's family are here, grandpa, grandma and other relatives are all here, my parents are gone.

If I was alone I would be in a plane back today!

 

 

 

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20 hours ago, yourkeau said:

 

Things are I love in particular:

1. Food, especially beer (it's officially considered basic food in Bavaria), the culture of bakeries, Bratwurst and recently I also start loving German wines (Silvaner/Weißer Burgunder are the best ones, Riesling is also ok).

 

 

I am happy to see I am not the only one who loves the food here (although that took me a while too - but i realized i just needed to get over a few blocks in my head).  I come from the land of steak, but I've never had such great thick perfectly good steaks as I do around here in some of the restaurants bordering the black forest.  The consistency is astounding.  The sauces (pfeffersoese, cognacrahmsoese) are amazing. Vegetables are always cooked perfectly too as side dishes.  Salads are a bit too vinegary for me, but when they slap a big load of meat on top, I can't complain too much.  

 

And although i dearly miss the 2.99 bacon and egg breakfast diners, I also love the cafe breakfasts here with the tiered platters of breads and cheeses.   

 

As for the unfriendliness that people complain about, I too don't quite understand it so i have to chalk it up to being regional.  Sunny baden is apparently the place to be if you want warm and relaxed germans, so be careful not to group German people all into one sack!  There are a few unfriendly, unwelcoming people where i live, my husband insists that they are just shy and insecure.  The majority are so jolly and so warm.  Its the kind of place where i can slap a post it note on my doorbell that says "Klingel geht net" and they laugh (as intended).   And what i like about them the most is that when they say they want to get together, or they say they are going to do something, they DO IT.  No excuses.  No "i got busy".  This is a huge bonus point over north america for me, where everyone says "we should get together" but won't actually make a date for it.  When i say "we should get together" to a German, all of a sudden the phones and daytimers come out, a date is set, and its a done deal. 

 

If you hate the weather where you are, i highly recommend moving here.  We can grow banana trees, so that says something.  We also have good mexican (in Karlsruhe).  

 

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@Joanie, I defintely get the same impression from the Badeners, way more laid back, open and friendly.  Ask the Badeners about my local group, the Swabians, and you get rolled eyes and a 'na ja, so sind sie halt'.  We do a yearly vacation on a farm in the Kinzigtal, and it is so nice, not just because of the amazing scenery, but also the friendly atmosphere there.  Strangers make eye contact, smile and say hello... Crazy!
 

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22 hours ago, Metall said:

Spring, summer, fall are great here.

Winter is miserable.

 

The pedantic rules are starting to look real good compared to the chaotic red tape I've encountered in the US, especially with it all getting much much worse exactly now. I am currently drowning in American bureaucracy... even the various official departments don't know why it's this way.

 

This just came up at our house when I recently had to do business with an American firm. I got routed around phone calls and emails till I gave up. Fine with me if they don't want my business. I thought they were all friendly enough. My wife (a German) told me that I had forgotten how it was to do business with Americans. It sort of took me back because I remembered doing business that way more often than not when I was back in the States.The attitude does seem a littlemore abrupt and colder here but you generally have efficient transactions happening. I do, after 13 years, like it here. The summers are great with lots of different cultures to experience only a day away by car or train.

 

I like the people here fine except for the occasional German who thonks they need to explain the rules to mein a strict tone of voice.

 

I took a few years but I like the food here now. 

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25 minutes ago, kapokanadensis said:

Strangers make eye contact, smile and say hello... Crazy!
 

 

Haha right. When I drop the kid I look after at Kindergarten every morning and say hello to other people dropping of the kids  many of them don't reply and look at me like: "are you talking to me?? Why???". It might actually be the same in the UK - I can't remember - but after living in Spain for three years it feels very harsh.

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58 minutes ago, Joanie said:

 

As for the unfriendliness that people complain about, I too don't quite understand it so i have to chalk it up to being regional. 

 

Have to agree with you there. Before moving to Germany my wife, who comes from N. Bavaria said basically we're not moving there, it would be too difficult to be accepted there, they don't like foreigners.She suggested RLP because of it's friendliness and acceptance of people from differnt countries. We actually live on the edge of the Pfalzwald and I find here so relaxed compared to NRW when I was there in the mid 80's. I love the way people here can actually take the mick out of themselves, just look how many self deprecating books and pictures there are in the Pfalz. I would say though that if you do venture into the forest valleys then there can be a totally different attitude, some of them can be really backward and from the dark ages in attitude.

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10 minutes ago, NathanInGermany said:

 

Haha right. When I drop the kid I look after at Kindergarten every morning and say hello to other people dropping of the kids  many of them don't reply and look at me like: "are you talking to me?? Why???". It might actually be the same in the UK - I can't remember - but after living in Spain for three years it feels very harsh.

It is the same in some parts of the UK. We lived in a town in the south Midlands. Talk about ignorance, a lady who lived on our street, who's daughter was in the same year at school as our daughter, wouldn't even acknowledge us even though we were practically neighbours. I hated the place and the shallowness of the people. Living here is a paradise in comparison but I have to say my hometown of Leicester is very friendly, probably comes from it being so multicultural.

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15 minutes ago, French bean said:

Have to agree with you there. Before moving to Germany my wife, who comes from N. Bavaria said basically we're not moving there, it would be too difficult to be accepted there, they don't like foreigners.She suggested RLP because of it's friendliness and acceptance of people from differnt countries. We actually live on the edge of the Pfalzwald and I find here so relaxed compared to NRW when I was there in the mid 80's. I love the way people here can actually take the mick out of themselves, just look how many self deprecating books and pictures there are in the Pfalz. I would say though that if you do venture into the forest valleys then there can be a totally different attitude, some of them can be really backward and from the dark ages in attitude.

 

Oh yeah, the Pfalz is very very nice.  I have friends there, we both lived in Stuttgart together and my poor Pfalz-friend felt like a foreigner and couldn't wait to get back to her RLP. I didn't find Stuttgart so bad, but she said the people were very different and she wasn't used to being stared at on trains like that. 

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27 minutes ago, NathanInGermany said:

 

Haha right. When I drop the kid I look after at Kindergarten every morning and say hello to other people dropping of the kids  many of them don't reply and look at me like: "are you talking to me?? Why???". It might actually be the same in the UK - I can't remember - but after living in Spain for three years it feels very harsh.

 

Kapo was referring to Kinzigtal.  Is that where you live?

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