Do you like living in Germany?

584 posts in this topic

18 hours ago, kiplette said:

Mine was about 500 quid - I think I may have been the first year of the system (there weren't tuition fees), and as a new teacher earned below the threshold. My husband got bored of the annual proof of income charade and paid it off after about 10 years.

I went to university in 1989 when there was a full grant of about £2300 IIRC; that was for living, you didn't pay anything to the university. The second year (i.e. 1990) was when they introduced loans for the first time, which meant I got the same grant as the previous year + £420 as a loan. Then the third year was £400 loan as it was my final year. So £820, which I think I deferred payment of for the first year I was working, and then paid it for a little while before paying it off. I also ended up with about £2K of overdraft which was a bigger problem. I went to Kent University where it was relatively expensive to live. I remember my friend who went to Hull got exactly the same grant but paid half as much in rent as me.

 

But that was then. I ask myself if I was 18 now and had to face £9K per year for the tuition plus living costs would I do it? Probably not. If I could get in, studying in Germany would seem like an excellent plan.

 

It seems to me, yes someone has to pay, and there's an argument that says where education is free it's also of lower quality and helps fewer people. OTOH poor education standards are responsible for a lot of the problems of the world and more of it can only be good.

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8 hours ago, cacilia_1 said:

It's the middle class in America that royally gets screwed.

So you have kids who live the first 16-18 years of their life in a low income household who then get "free" college and you have kids who live the first 16-18 years in a middle class household who have to pay and they`re getting screwed.

Over 50% of college graduates come from families in the top 20% of earners.

14% come from low income families.

3 hours ago, razorsandroses said:

they give free CARS to welfare recipients

?

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Hi guys, I’m a new member to this Forum. I’m looking forward to moving and living in Germany in a near future (next year). I’m from a country in Eastern Africa. My girlfriend is a German living in Leipzig, currently a university student in another city. 

So am frustrated about 3 things. 

I want to move in Germany for a sake of being close to my girl and living together in one country. I’m graduating from a statistics field next year from a University in my country.

What are the better options for me to move in there?

Is it easier to get a job and work since am not experienced and I’ll just have graduated? What about an internship? Is it possible to get one? What are the hindrances? And lastly someone suggested I should go there and apply for a language school or student visa? Whilst doing German classes I could do a per-time job. How is that? Last but not least there’s this idea of teaching English.. Is it possible? How difficult is it for me a non English native speaker. But when trying to help answer this question please bear it in mind that am a non EU-citizen. Thank you in advance. Cheers!

 

 

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Student visas are difficult to come by, as you will need to have €10.000 set aside in a bank to live on AND be accepted to a university--competition amongst new entrants is cut throat, and you'll need to have some impressive credentials to be considered. Language school visas--possible? Yes. Easy to acquire? Don't waste your time.

 

Work visa--it needs to be a skilled labor job that no average unskilled German with no credentials can easily be hired to do. By this, I mean dentist, computer programmer, carpenter, electrician, etc. AND you need to have the job already lined up with your employer agreeing to hire you.

 

As far as language skills go, you will find that German speakers do in fact tend to take higher priority over non German speakers. 

 

Now...if you don't value your psychological well being, another option would be to marry your German girlfriend. You'll automatically receive a permit allowing you to do any sort of work. After she's driven you up the wall enough and caused you more grey hairs than your grandfather, you can divorce her after 3 years and keep the permit indefinitely.

 

Good luck!

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22 minutes ago, Rommie said:

’m looking forward to moving and living in Germany in a near future (next year).

 

We are still at the beginning of the pandemic and I suspect that many immigration laws will change by next year.

 

22 minutes ago, Rommie said:

I’m graduating from a statistics field next year from a University in my country.

What are the better options for me to move in there?

 

Get some work experience before you consider moving here.

 

22 minutes ago, Rommie said:

Is it easier to get a job and work since am not experienced and I’ll just have graduated?

 

Many foreign students struggle to find jobs here after graduation from German universities. Again try to get a year or two of post-graduate work experience before moving and then post again later.

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

 

We are still at the beginning of the pandemic and I suspect that many immigration laws will change by next year.

What changes are you expecting?

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6 hours ago, razorsandroses said:

Student visas are difficult to come by, as you will need to have €10.000 set aside in a bank to live on AND be accepted to a university--competition amongst new entrants is cut throat, and you'll need to have some impressive credentials to be considered. Language school visas--possible? Yes. Easy to acquire? Don't waste your time.

 

Work visa--it needs to be a skilled labor job that no average unskilled German with no credentials can easily be hired to do. By this, I mean dentist, computer programmer, carpenter, electrician, etc. AND you need to have the job already lined up with your employer agreeing to hire you.

 

As far as language skills go, you will find that German speakers do in fact tend to take higher priority over non German speakers. 

 

Now...if you don't value your psychological well being, another option would be to marry your German girlfriend. You'll automatically receive a permit allowing you to do any sort of work. After she's driven you up the wall enough and caused you more grey hairs than your grandfather, you can divorce her after 3 years and keep the permit indefinitely.

 

Good luck!

Thank you for your concern and help.

Well, I think German language course and a student visa for that can work better.

Maybe I didn’t say it before with the previous post; But am currently doing a bachelor degree in statistics. I was primarily thinking of doing a masters degree in statistics. Could a degree from my country translate?

Well, my girlfriend and I are not planning to mary this soon. So this plan won’t work I guess. She’s doing studies with a bachelor degree. And I can’t divorce her Haha! We came a long way and am going there for her. Unfortunately German laws don’t allow this reunification (as UK) until marriage.

 

So what I think is a German language school and student visa. After this, probably when I’ll be there I can plan well for my masters program and i might’ve earned and saved money for it. Any ideas guys??

Cheers!

 

 

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6 hours ago, engelchen said:

 

We are still at the beginning of the pandemic and I suspect that many immigration laws will change by next year.

 

 

Get some work experience before you consider moving here.

 

 

Many foreign students struggle to find jobs here after graduation from German universities. Again try to get a year or two of post-graduate work experience before moving and then post again later.

What immigration laws do you think will change? And what makes you think so?

Do you think the pandemic has changed immigration motives?

 

I wish I stayed here for a year or more to get a work experience but I said my moving to German is to join my girlfriend. Had it been that I wasn’t studying, I could probably have joined her already. I need to first graduate next year.

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9 minutes ago, Rommie said:

But am currently doing a bachelor degree in statistics. I was primarily thinking of doing a masters degree in statistics. Could a degree from my country translate?

 

Look it up on anabin.

 

9 minutes ago, Rommie said:

So what I think is a German language school and student visa. After this, probably when I’ll be there I can plan well for my masters program and i might’ve earned and saved money for it.

 

You need at least 10,000 €. Do you have 10k saved?

 

4 minutes ago, Rommie said:

What immigration laws do you think will change? And what makes you think so?

Do you think the pandemic has changed immigration motives?

 

The pandemic has proven that certain curtain immigration policies are not a good idea and will need to be changed. It is too soon to speculate exactly what will happen. Ask again after you graduate.

 

 

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Tough.  I would not recommend English teaching (crappy pay) or anything like that.

The only exception I could see is if she lives near Trier or would be willing to relocate: https://www2.daad.de/deutschland/studienangebote/international-programmes/en/detail/4679/

That actually sounds like pretty cool Master's program!  Do that.  If she doesn't want to move to Trier, then find another girlfriend. :)

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On 4/11/2020, 5:23:29, engelchen said:

 

We are still at the beginning of the pandemic and I suspect that many immigration laws will change by next year.

 

 

Get some work experience before you consider moving here.

 

 

Many foreign students struggle to find jobs here after graduation from German universities. Again try to get a year or two of post-graduate work experience before moving and then post again later.

Hello @BradinBayern thank you for your help and concern. Maybe I didn’t say it but my girlfriend is studying at a university in Kassel. So it’s so unfortunate that she can’t move to Trier.

I’m a little worried about the master’s program. The costs, the competition of the DAAD scholarships and the grades they need. I’m a very average student.

This pushes me to think of plan B.

 

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Hey @BradinBayern Additional information: Well, am studying a Bachelor’s degree in Statistics with an ambition to work as a data analyst or data scientist or any equivalent job (I’m not limiting).

I’m wishing and expecting to move to Germany in the last quarter of 2021 from around September. This is when I will have completed and graduated my 3 years Bachelor at a university in my country.

I’m currently learning German level A2 (I did A1 already).

My biggest plan is to stay closer and live near to my girlfriend. We both agreed of me moving to Germany and we can live there after 3 years of visiting each other. She is studying at Uni till 2023.

We had many options at hand to make this possible, varying from taking a masters degree there and working afterwards to doing an internship. So many thoughts and each seems difficult.

Some suggested marriage but this is not our plan this sooner.

What can you suggest?

I thought getting a job with a degree from my country would be difficult since I don’t have any experience. Could a degree from my country translate?

What about an internship? How hard could it be?

My previous thought was taking german language classes at Volkshochschule for integration but also preparing for a master’s degree of which I could do it in German after a year or 1.5yrs at Volkshochschule. But grades could be an hindrance again and affording education might be expensive and that’s why I thought of working first. So Bradin (and maybe anyone else reading this) y’all can see what’s running in my head. Nothing is clear. I’m open for your ideas guys. Cheers!

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Moving to Germany is a big step, perhaps bigger than marriage.  If you are not ready for marriage, then maybe you are not ready to move for her?   Getting a job here under normal circumstances without being able to speak the language fluently and without job experience would be rough. Not to mention without a valid work permit. Looking for work during the coming economic downturn is going to be horrible. Many of us are already hoping to keep the jobs we have and are already dependant on government programs for Kurzarbeit or unemployment benefits for which you would not qualify.  You could not have picked a worse time to come.  I would highly not recommend that you just come and hope to work things out.  This would be overly optimistic and will end in tears.  A Master's program would give you the right to live in the country, would give you time to learn the language and the culture, and would give you additional qualifications.  However, you would also need a means to support yourself, which would again be tough.  

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38 minutes ago, BradinBayern said:

Moving to Germany is a big step, perhaps bigger than marriage

What? Don´t let that read your wife. She might get doubts about your commitment to her.

 

38 minutes ago, BradinBayern said:

A Master's program would give you the right to live in the country,

and also to work

5 hours ago, Rommie said:

Could a degree from my country translate

As engelchen in her kind ways already postet you can check on Anabin

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1 hour ago, jeba said:

What? Don´t let that read your wife. She might get doubts about your commitment to her.

What about her commitment to me (or her to him)?  Reading between the lines from the OP, I am guessing that it is the girlfriend who is not willing to relocate or marry. So it would be on him to take all of the risk and effort to be with her so that she can kick him to the curb if things don't work out?  If she is not ready to commit or sacrifice then he should rethink his plans.  

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1 hour ago, BradinBayern said:

But with restrictions...

Yes, but it would enable him to make a living and -that´s what I actually had in mind- after graduation he´d have 18 (?) months to find a job in his field and would be entitled to a work permit for it. At least that´s what I gathered from a lot of different TT threads (being German I never had reason to investigate that question).

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2 hours ago, jeba said:

What? Don´t let that read your wife. She might get doubts about your commitment to her.

 

and also to work

As engelchen in her kind ways already postet you can check on Anabin

Marriage is much more important than moving to Germany. Four years together can’t rise her doubts. Infact we’re doing all this to stay or live closer to each other (even together). 

Marriage can make things easy but that’s not the intention. It could be a year later.

A master’s degree remains to be the only option then :(

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19 minutes ago, jeba said:

Yes, but it would enable him to make a living and -that´s what I actually had in mind- after graduation he´d have 18 (?) months to find a job in his field and would be entitled to a work permit for it. At least that´s what I gathered from a lot of different TT threads (being German I never had reason to investigate that question).

Possibly, I am actually not sure what the restrictions currently are.  I think it is 120 days or something like that.  Don't quote me on that though.  Can one earn enough in 120 days to live on?  At least you won't have tuition to worry about.  

 

During my time, it was unrestricted over the breaks so I would work 2-3 jobs over the breaks to try to earn enough to get me through.  I am pretty sure you cannot do that any more.  I agree though that the education route would be the best one for the OP although I question it when he says that he needs work on his German which is why I directed him to an English-only program.  Of course he says he also needs work on his grades which would also disqualify him from a Master's program in any language.  

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3 minutes ago, Rommie said:

Marriage is much more important than moving to Germany. Four years together can’t rise her doubts. Infact we’re doing all this to stay or live closer to each other (even together). 

Marriage can make things easy but that’s not the intention. It could be a year later.

A master’s degree remains to be the only option then :(

Marriage makes things MUCH easier.  You will struggle to live here and work legally until you are married and then at least those problems disappear like magic.  Of course that was also only part of the point.  The point is also that the #1 reason you are considering this move is because of the relationship and whether you are sure that the commitment is mutual.  Believe me, unfortunately I speak from experience.  It is much easier to tell your boyfriend/girlfriend that they are allowed to come and live with you then it is to pack up your things. leave your family and culture, learn a new language, deal with culture shock, be unemployed for extended periods of time, etc. etc. Has she ever considered moving to YOUR country to be closer to you?  Relationships also tend to change once one person becomes dependent on the other because of challenges in language and culture (or income).  But that of course is your decision, and being young and in love you will probably ignore me anyway.  

 

Yeah, I would say that your chances of finding legal work in your situation and the current economic climate in Germany are between very slim and none.  You still have time to get your grades up and improve your German so that you can get into a Master's program - which should be your focus, IMHO.  

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