Do you like living in Germany?

584 posts in this topic

6 minutes ago, Namu said:

 

Yeah, as long as you find the aggressiveness of Germans shocking and not the high murder rate in your city I think Germany is not for you.

 

Lol. I think you misunderstood me, sarcasm is usually strong with me so sorry if that was not a clear "only". But I never said I don't find the high murder rates in Orlando shocking or that it isn't terrible, surprisingly we are higher here than Miami which is unbelievable to me still. I wasn't the one who started to use the word 'shocking' in this thread and I think 'offputting' is better for what that person was describing - like being snapped at by store associates, random elderly German men telling you to get out of the way etc. 

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Offputting and being shot or even seeing someone else being shot are two totally different things. I prefer offputting, thank you. That's why I'm here at least for one reason. The other being, of course, "free" and excellent health care.

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4 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Offputting and being shot or even seeing someone else being shot are two totally different things. I prefer offputting, thank you. That's why I'm here at least for one reason. The other being, of course, "free" and excellent health care.

 

I agree. I was more commenting on the fact that someone liked Miami and then someone said something about being shot. Since the murder rate had just come across my Facebook feed literally moments earlier, I relayed that. I feel a little attacked right now and/or misunderstood for what I said. I've only been back online like 2 days :blink:. Again, I DID NOT say anywhere that it's the same, that guns are awesome, that being shot is wonderful, or anything like it. Jesus. 

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7 hours ago, BethAnnBitt said:

Lucky You! What a gift.

 

Thanks Beth. It's a blessing and a curse ;) . It has opened a lot of opportunity and experiences for me. But it also has resulted in me being a very torn individual. To bring this back 'on topic' - I liked and disliked living in Germany for many reasons. I like and dislike living in the US for different reasons. I'm currently once again weighing these and will have to make some final decision. 

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Sorry, LBC. Wasn't attacking. Just sharing my thoughts as one is wont to do on a chat forum. 

 

I've often wondered how so many Germans go retire in Florida and how they manage their health costs. It is normal for Americans to include an extra mil or so in retirement planning for unforeseen health costs. Not so much here.

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Just now, LostBetweenCountries said:

 

Thanks Beth. It's a blessing and a curse ;) . It has opened a lot of opportunity and experiences for me. But it also has resulted in me being a very torn individual. To bring this back 'on topic' - I liked and disliked living in Germany for many reasons. I like and dislike living in the US for different reasons. I'm currently once again weighing these and will have to make some final decision. 

I get it. My husband moved with his parents to the US when he was 6. He‘s never felt totally part of either culture and has had similarly conflictual feelings.  To top it off his parents were actually ethnic Germans from Serbia who were badly mistreated and then relocated as displaced persons to Germany after WW II.  So Germany wasn’t their home either.  These experiences give people like you all a wider cultural understanding, but they can also affect a sense of belonging.  
 

Stay strong and keep working on your health.  Sounds like you are going through a lot right now.  I wish you the best.

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2 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

Sorry, LBC. Wasn't attacking. Just sharing my thoughts as one is wont to do on a chat forum. 

 

I've often wondered how so many Germans go retire in Florida and how they manage their health costs. It is normal for Americans to include an extra mil or so in retirement planning for unforeseen health costs. Not so much here.

 

All good. I am going to blame it on the whole 'interwebs' and misinterpreting. 

 

Oh, I don't know how people retire here and not hold jobs that give them some sort of medical benefits. But I do know of people who travel to Germany for medical treatments - which won't help them in an emergency situation so i don't know... Now that I've got medical issues I didn't have before I am certainly questioning my motives - and I am only 3 grand in so far. 

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5 hours ago, fraufruit said:

 It is normal for Americans to include an extra mil or so in retirement planning for unforeseen health costs. Not so much here.

 

Wow! A million? That's new to me. Of course, I don't go around asking people how much they have for retirement, but I know my parents and my mom's parents never had even a million to retire on, let alone extra for medical problems.

 

Anyway to try to stay on topic, I really loved living in Germany. I even started to like Berlin after a couple of years and I didn't use to be a fan of big cities. I hope to get back to Germany, but we'll see how that works.

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11 hours ago, fraufruit said:

so many Germans go retire in Florida 

 

Many Germans retire in Florida...??😲🤔

I don't think this is true...

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1 minute ago, Gambatte said:

 

Many Germans retire in Florida...??😲🤔

I don't think this is true...

At least no longer since Germany stopped paying Hartz IV benefits to people like Florida-Rolf

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Hartz IV has nothing to do with Rente.

The Rentenversicherung says:

Rente im Ausland: Genießen Sie Ihren Ruhestand am Wunschort

Ob Mallorca, Paris oder Florida – jeder erhält seine deutsche Rente auch im Ausland. Hier erfahren Sie, was Sie beachten müssen.

 

The problem is that you will only get a visa for 180 days.

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11 hours ago, LostBetweenCountries said:

 

I agree. I was more commenting on the fact that someone liked Miami and then someone said something about being shot. Since the murder rate had just come across my Facebook feed literally moments earlier, I relayed that. I feel a little attacked right now and/or misunderstood for what I said. I've only been back online like 2 days :blink:. Again, I DID NOT say anywhere that it's the same, that guns are awesome, that being shot is wonderful, or anything like it. Jesus. 

Welcome to TT.

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Yes. Florida has many retired Germans. Florida in general hosts many „snowbirds“, that is people from colder climates who come for 3 months of winter. Snowbirds from colder US climates, like NY or the Midwest, come too.  The rental market is appropriately adapted to this.  It’s actually difficult, per my Midwestern snowbird friends, to rent something for less than 3 months during that season. She has arthritis and they often go for all of Jan-Feb-March. 

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7 hours ago, JN53 said:

 

Wow! A million? That's new to me.

 

The actual recommendation from financial advisers is a minimum $250k per person for medical/care home needs. The other $500k is for supplementing pensions.

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I like living in Germany because I live in a nice rural area. This is the first time in my life I've been a 'country' person and I enjoy my quiet life surrounded by nature. The countryside is a nice place to come home to after a stressful day at work too!

 

 

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8 hours ago, fraufruit said:

 

The actual recommendation from financial advisers is a minimum $250k per person for medical/care home needs. The other $500k is for supplementing pensions.

Maybe Americans start saving younger and with more " risk " ( though that is controversial..what does it mean?). Based on my experience, Americans start also for  their children at a young age investing with Fidelity, Templeton etc in mutual funds rather than the traditionally risk-averse Germans with their Sparbuch and Bausparen for kids etc.

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2 minutes ago, john g. said:

Maybe Americans start saving younger and with more " risk " ( though that is controversial..what does it mean?). Based on my experience, Americans start also for  their children at a young age investing with Fidelity, Templeton etc in mutual funds rather than the traditionally risk-averse Germans with their Sparbuch and Bausparen for kids etc.

 

Only wealthy Americans start investments for their children at a young age. Middle class may do the same just to pay for an education. What I have been reading lately across the board is that 40% of Americans don't even have $400 dollars saved for an emergency.

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2 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

Only wealthy Americans start investments for their children at a young age. Middle class may do the same just to pay for an education. What I have been reading lately across the board is that 40% of Americans don't even have $400 dollars saved for an emergency

from CNBC on 1/23/19:

Just 40 percent of Americans are able to cover an unexpected $1,000 expense, such as an emergency room visit or car repair, with their savings, according to a survey from personal finance website Bankrate.

 

You will find other studies with slightly different numbers but making the same general point. I would say it’s not „wealthy Americans“ who start saving early with investments, but rather the upper middle class (i.e. the professional class).  Those same folks start with savings for college.  Middle class kids generally need to take take out loans to afford college and the debt loads are staggering.  The truly wealthy, such as Sergey Bringen, Bill Gates, and Warren Buffett, are in another world.  

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When I say wealthy, I'm referring to the upper middle class. Not the 1%.

 

Back before the insane health care situation, etc. my middle class parents saved for our educations, all 4 of us. Of course tuition was much cheaper then but so was the cost of living. Two of us didn't choose to go to university so more retirement money for them.

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Just semantics then. When I hear wealthy I think rich.  But these terms also have different meanings in different areas of the country.  

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