Do you like living in Germany?

361 posts in this topic

47 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

I feel a bit out of place when I go visit in the U.S. When I meet new people there, they will inevitably ask me which church I attend and ask me if I'm Clemson or Carolina - the 2  college sport rivals. They literally say, "Are you Clemson or Carolina?"

 

I do love eating prime rib, King crab legs, good nachos, etc. when there but have no problem with all of the good food I get here in Germany and I eat much healthier here.

 

My favorite thing about living here is the feeling of security which includes many things - no guns, affordable good health insurance and feeling secure in retirement. I also appreciate all of the different international cultures here compared to my redneck state of South Carolina. Oh, and I don't need to drive anywhere unless I choose to do so - 3 cheers for public transportation, bike paths and sidewalks everywhere!

 

And last but not least, we don't have President Trump!

 

I feel a bit out of place myself sometimes, even though I don't do church and clearly say so. I just don't get some of the American hangups (nudity, race, service entitlement), I can't identify poison ivy/oak/sumac right away, the hypocritical flipflop of super morals (during the day) and party craziness (after sundown) is weird to me.

 

But we always could eat healthy in the US. Mr Metall was dieting (very successfully), and I was impressed how any diner/fast food place/hot dog stand readily exchanged ingredients, such as pretty decent salads for fries etc.

 

Health insurance and street security in Germany are a great thing. If this is Socialism (aka Republican rhetoric), I'm all for it. :)

 

As for right wing populist politicians, I'm afraid Germany/Europe is growing a nice crop of those as we speak...

 

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28 minutes ago, programdirector said:

But I would say the biggest thing for me is the people.

You're right. Sometimes the people are just too 'German' in their attitude, but many times when I've despaired someone has come from nowhere, bucking the trend, and has shown me an act of empathy or kindness that has made me feel that all is well in the world again.

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I've been here 17 years now and feel almost half German. I miss some stuff from home, mostly the ocean and Mexican food but I have no desire to go back. I have no living family or anything else that would draw me back and I could not imagine working in the US ever again. I guess I would be happy to live in most places in Europe though.
If I were to leave there are a lot of things I would miss from here too. I don"t get the whole Germans are unfriendly... I have made great friends here, friends I can actually count on. 

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it's been almost 2 years living here. I have still not completely warmed up to this place. security, money everything is great but i am still struggling making friends specially Germans. I have friends and majority of them are not Germans that i met in my language school.I miss having lots of friends like i used to have in my home country and doing all crazy things together. I feel like i matured here in these 2 years , i got quite and i mind my own business and can easily spend time alone. It's still a struggle to integrate and off course language is always one thing i still crib about. 

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Been here 34 years (commuted from UK for a couple of years before that).

Living here full time (& being on my own) was suprisingly much harder than for visits (even long ones).

However, we had a bridge group at the lab (DESY) once a week & I got involved (= sort of dragged into)

a Luftsportverein where I learnt to fly gliders/sailplanes.  After a couple of years met future wife & things

went downhill from there.  Left University employment for industry.

 

The flying club has given a number of long-term friends (incl. a witness at our wedding & I at his) but I

guess I have none outside.  I kept picking up jobs (=tasks) within the Verein & the organisation both

at federal state & national level but recently I get the feeling I would like to get rid of some of the work

at least - some hope though. 

 

I still feel I'm British - whether the current Brits would feel same way about me I dunno!

 

 

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Germans have so much to be happy for. A lot of outdoor activities, good public transit, good quality of life in relation to the cost, a fair government. 

Why the F* are they so stuck up and unfriendly? So much to be happy for!!!!! 

This country would be 10/10 if it wasn't for a big chunk of its people.

 

Been living here 4.5 years, and am overall happy with my life. The one bit that gets to me and sometimes makes me want to move is the lack of human warmth, laughter, courtesy, big personalities. I miss gay people as well. I met 3 openly gay people in Germany in almost 5 years living here. 

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3 minutes ago, vmelchers said:

Germans have so much to be happy for. A lot of outdoor activities, good public transit, good quality of life in relation to the cost, a fair government. 

Why the F* are they so stuck up and unfriendly? So much to be happy for!!!!! 

This country would be 10/10 if it wasn't for a big chunk of its people.

 

Been living here 4.5 years, and am overall happy with my life. The one bit that gets to me and sometimes makes me want to move is the lack of human warmth, laughter, courtesy, big personalities. I miss gay people as well. I met 3 openly gay people in Germany in almost 5 years living here. 

 

What outdoor activities do they have here that they don't have in other countries? 

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I've been here since 2003 and I do like it here. The things that annoy me about people here also annoyed me back in the UK as well.

I am the quiet type when I am going about my stuff in town and I do not like being bothered by people who work in shops, so I guess Germany fits with me that way.

In the bakery at 06:00 in the morning I just want to buy the stuff I came in for, not to chat. 

I like not having to make small talk with people I do not know, I don't dislike it but can live without it.

I guess I have been lucky in that I have always met nice people, German and otherwise, with a few exceptions. 

I have met m share of strange people and racists and bigots but they are spread across two countries and have had my share of not so nice incidents. 

Do I consider myself British, yes, but not as much as I did. That was the case before Brexit and I guess it will stay that way.
When I visit home I get the usual amount of 'you have changed' - well, yes I have. I notice that certain friendships are not the same or that we have little to talk about. With one group we only chat about our families and then... Nothing. They have not worked for a long time (some never) and I live and work in a different country. All we have in common is an area and the fact that we know each other's families.

My older friends, those from way back, they area little different. That tends to be the way of that. I slot back in during the visit and we revert back to how it was. Not just to before I came over here, but before I went to Uni, so we revert to our pre-work pre-kids days. It is ok for a visit, but I doubt we would do that so often if I still lived there.

On the whole I would say I like living here more than I would back in my home town. I love the place but it is not home anymore. It is a kind of half home but that is how I am. If I move I retain a fondness for the old place, but I never get any longings to go back.
I lived there, now I live here. If I were to move back, then the situation reverses itself.

Having said that, I know when I do not want to live in a city/town etc.

 

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I've lived her for more than 30 years and I can't really imagine living anywhere else. I have a nice house with very friendly neighbours, several of them I regard as close friends. I tend to mix with ex pats more than the locals these days, but I do have a social life with the locals as well. I think living in a small village like I do, makes it easier to get to know the locals. I'm probably about to start the process of getting German citizenship after the madness of Brexit, but I don't feel German, but I do like them and I love living here.

 

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13 minutes ago, vmelchers said:

I miss gay people as well. I met 3 openly gay people in Germany in almost 5 years living here. 

 

Go to Sendlinger Tor in the centre of Munich. You'll meet a lot of them there. At Christmas they have an over the top, pink Christmas market. It's worth a visit even if you're not that way inclined.

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9 minutes ago, Adem137 said:

 

What outdoor activities do they have here that they don't have in other countries? 

 

Many more bike paths and trails than in Canada where I am from. Hiking in the alps, bathing in lakes, or in the sea up north, skiing, lots more horse-back riding possibilities. 

From where I live now I can go work a corporate job in a big city (Munich) I can go run along the Isar river or kayak in it, I can bike 4km to a lake and jump in it or walk 2km and go horseback riding. In my life in Canada this was never possible. If you live in a metropolitan area, you need to drive at least 2 hours to do some outdoor stuff away from the street.

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14 minutes ago, Adem137 said:

 

What outdoor activities do they have here that they don't have in other countries? 

Via ferrata-s. Originally an Italian invention, Germany has 262 of them, third after Italy (513) and Austria (661). About half of them are not in the Alps and that is more than in Switzerland which is an Alpine country, and more than in France which co-owns Mont Blanc.

 

This is the greatest invention ever.

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Yes. I am originally from the US, my wife is German and I moved here from New York City about 2 years ago. I have also lived in Italy, the UK, and Switzerland. My only real complaint is living far away from my dearest family and friends, and that has nothing to do with the country itself. Although I've met some really good friends here consisting of people from Berlin, Germans from elsewhere in the country, and foreigners like myself, I miss not being able to see my parents, siblings, and the friends I grew up with whenever I want. All told, I think the decision was worth it, and in my experience it's much easier to lead a fulfilling middle class life in Germany than it is in the US.

Yes, some things are annoying, like German 'customer service' and bureaucracy, but I think overall, the positives outweigh the negatives and I'm willing to put up with those things to not have to deal with the annoying things I would have to deal with in the US, especially: complicated / expensive healthcare system, lack of job security, 15 days of vacation which you are discouraged to take in full, high cost of living (I'm from NY), and mind-boggling child care costs.

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1 hour ago, vmelchers said:

The one bit that gets to me and sometimes makes me want to move is the lack of human warmth, laughter, courtesy, big personalities. I miss gay people as well. I met 3 openly gay people in Germany in almost 5 years living here. 

 

You need to spend more time in the Munich gay area (Müllerstrasse near Sendlinger Tor) !

There even is a Toytown Munich meetup of LGBT and friends, the next one is this Friday:

https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/357991-lgbt-meetup-march-queerbeer-muc-11mar2016/?do=findComment&comment=3530293

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I've been in Germany for 7 years now. Had good days and bad, but overall way more good days than bad ones. So I'd say yes, I do like living here.

 

There are some things that annoy the hell out of me about Germany and Germans, but I can say that about Canada and Canadians as well.

 

If I compare living in Canada to living in Germany, Germany wins hands down.

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5 hours ago, yourkeau said:

his has multiple advantages but in particular no separatist movements like in Spain or UK;

Really? When was it that Bavaria signed the Federation document? Remind me please...

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50 minutes ago, klubbnika said:

Really? When was it that Bavaria signed the Federation document? Remind me please...

Really. I know the history of Bavaria, thank you. I speak of present time,  not about 1940s. Separatism back then was very logical: a lot of people remembered good old days of prince regent Luitpold and the general times of Königsreich Bayern. In contrast, united Germany offered economical crisis in Weimar Republic times and Nazis after that. I think many people back then were thinking positive of returning to Kaiser times.

 

This non signatory was a symbolical gesture that not all German states could sign back then. And when was actually GG signed? At Schloss Herrenchiemsee, Bavaria.

 

The Bayernpartei was initially in the Landtag, but not anymore. This is now a very, very unpopular movement. You don't seriously consider that Bayernpartei (2% at the last elections) has the same influence as SNP in the UK.

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Originally lived in Berlin 1992-2006, returned in 2015 and planning to stay. Yes the winter is dank and grey and Berliner Schnauze is as tiresome as ever, but overall it's the quality of life, the culture and many good friends that brought us back. In the 18 months since returning we occasionally wondered whether we were being blinded by a nostalgic memory of how it used to be back in the early 90's, but have managed to resettle very happily. Also in our 9 year absence the overall quality of restaurants in Berlin improved significantly.

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