Do you like living in Germany?

584 posts in this topic

5 hours ago, jeremy said:

 

That's what crushed me, the loneliness. Absolutely noone to help or chew their ear off for a coffee.

 

The grandparents did nothing. At. All. Once I had to have a MRI scan. Lets say I live in town B. I had to drive the kids to A where they live, then back through B to get to C, all half an hour apart. Then get the scan then drive back from C to A through my town B. I know if I'd lived in my Welsh village my Mum would have been at the doorstep if I'd needed her in seconds. So the last ten years although I love my kids have been bittersweet for me. I'm pretty open but found all the mothers cold to me.

Grandparents are people too. Some are good with children and some are just not that interested. My parents-in-law would have helped if they don't live so far away (four hours drive!). To win the grandparents-lottery with having kind grandparents who are good with kids, eager to help and living nearby, is really pretty rare, I think. 

Friends too. In the various Krabbelgruppen I joined, some mothers are friendly to me and some are just not interested. And they don't have to be. In any societies you'll find people who want to be friends with you and the rest who don't. Germany is no different. I stopped caring so much about making friends with fellow moms. I just be the way I am and if they like it, great, if not, tschüss.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Jonny said:

There's mollycoddling and there's common sense. 40 years ago I was taught about stranger danger. Would you rather your kid got into a stranger's car when they offered them sweets or to see some puppies ?? Come on, there's a lot of sick people out there and it's our duty to instill some common sense into our kids.

That reminds me of when I was a kid and a stranger offered me some sweets. As told by my parents I declined as I was afraid they might be poisoned. I still remember how I felt like kicking myself when he ate them himself.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I am missing is a video where kids are told, how to survive their parents.

To my knowledge about 10 children are killed by strangers each year, but 150 to 200 by their parents.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't the old saying "You can choose your friends, but not your family". If your family kill you there's not a lot of teaching can prevent that.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find the country backward, especially from a technological point of view...there is no way that IT startups will leave London (if they'll leave at all) to move to Berlin, the technological and legal infrastructure here is 10 (if not more) years behind.

Just the daily example...I want to port my mobile phone number from Lebara (horrible coverage, and they use the Telekom network...but the mobile TLC industry in this country is a joke). To do this I need to print and fill by hand 2 pieces of paper, scan and send one by e-mail, and send the other by snail mail...in 2017. And of course I have to pay Lebara 25 EUR for the privilege, while I'm sure in many other European countries this can be done online and for free...

 

Everything is paper-based here, slow, bureaucratic...

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's got a point though, technology wise Germany is far behind the UK. I still need to pay with coins to get the tram in Cologne. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also the number of CCTV's shows, how advanced the UK is compared to Germany.

" A Londoner is caught on a close circuit surveillance camera over 300 times a day, thanks to the 51,600 CCTV cameras installed across Britain controlled by local authorities, almost 20 per cent of the world's CCTV population. "

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

Also the number of CCTV's shows, how advanced the UK is compared to Germany.

" A Londoner is caught on a close circuit surveillance camera over 300 times a day, thanks to the 51,600 CCTV cameras installed across Britain controlled by local authorities, almost 20 per cent of the world's CCTV population. "

that's "advanced"?

 

 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ smaug on 14.2.17, 9.52 am:

 

Absolutely right about the geographical origins of High and Low German. Now we know why the Niederrhein is actually the geographical northern Rhine and the Oberrhein is actually the geographical southern Rhine.

It also explains why "Oberbayern" is geographical southern Bavaria and Niederbayern is geographical northern Bavaria.

You get the idea.

 

Pedantry on:

 

However, Letzebürgisch is not a Low German dialect. in fact it is a Central German dialect ("Mitteldeutsch", like "Kölsch"), specifically a Mosel-Fanconian dialect of the aforesaid Central German dialect family.

 

Interestingly, Mitteldeutsch is a subcategory of High German with a few Low German admixtures. See: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxemburgische_Sprache .

(in German).

 

Historically, Central German is also the "seed language" (my term) of Dutch, not Low German.

 

Pedantry off.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13.2.2017, 19:55:47, jeba said:

Then you´re talking about a Kindergarten. They start as of 3 years. Kitas are for kids up to 3 years.

KITAs is the general term for all sorts of Kindergarten. In my area at least the Kitas for the very small are called Kinderhort. Most of the time Kitas here take care of both the very small and children 3 years old and older.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Namu said:

KITAs is the general term for all sorts of Kindergarten. In my area at least the Kitas for the very small are called Kinderhort. Most of the time Kitas here take care of both the very small and children 3 years old and older.

Sorry to disagree. Kita is short for Kindertagesstätte which is for kids below Kindergarten-age (i. e. 3 years - at least I´m not aware of it being used differently). A Kinderhort is for kids of schoolgoing age.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, jeba said:

Sorry to disagree. Kita is short for Kindertagesstätte which is for kids below Kindergarten-age (i. e. 3 years - at least I´m not aware of it being used differently). A Kinderhort is for kids of schoolgoing age.

 

I think it depends on the opening hours of the Kita. If they cater for kiddies from morning (7:00 / 8:00 hrs) till late afternoon (15:00 /16:30 hrs) then they are a Kindertagesstätte (Kita) regardless of age. I've got a list of all the Kiindergartens in my town and they are all calling themselves Kitas even the ones that only take in kiddies starting with 3 years of age but are open till at least 15:00 hrs. The staying times are staggered. Parents can choose how long their children stay. Say from morning till noon etc or all day.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

all my plans to move back to germany have failed,

 

i'm getting too old for this sh1t

 

i'll try my luck in the west of ireland for a while

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, rasperktos said:

all my plans to move back to germany have failed,

 

i'm getting too old for this sh1t

 

i'll try my luck in the west of ireland for a while

 

Yeah, sometimes you just have to go where fate will take you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎14‎.‎02‎.‎2017‎ ‎09‎:‎52‎:‎26, Smaug said:

 

Good explanation. There's a lot of confusion around about what "High German" means.

 

I've found that some people assume that "high German" is called that because it was historically the language of the cultured and the aristocracy, whereas low German would be the vernacular of the peasants. The truth is that the low/high German classification is based on that (roughly) high German dialects originate in mountainous areas, such as Bavaria and Austria, whereas low German dialects are native to the flatter (lower) northern areas.

Technically, Dutch, Flemish, Afrikaans and Luxembourgian are low German dialects.

 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

That is precisely what my German tutor said.  Bayerisch is technically High German.

 

After 12 years here, my experience is that "High German" is German you can understand because it contains little or no dialect, even if the "accent" is almost impregnable. 

 

On the radio you hear "High German". 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎15‎.‎02‎.‎2017‎ ‎10‎:‎27‎:‎59, AnswerToLife42 said:

Also the number of CCTV's shows, how advanced the UK is compared to Germany.

" A Londoner is caught on a close circuit surveillance camera over 300 times a day, thanks to the 51,600 CCTV cameras installed across Britain controlled by local authorities, almost 20 per cent of the world's CCTV population. "

 

 

You think Germans lack this technology?  Ha!

 

There's something called a Right to Privacy here, which is why CCTV is a hot potato.  I know people whowon't even get a gmail address or purchase over Amazon, for fear of Big Brother.

 

Suspected murderers are referred to in the papers as "Thomas M."

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now